One of the cool things about working with NetBase on a series of webinars is that they are a market research tool and send me cool things like the chart below. Scanning the web for conversations around the various advertisers on last night’s Super Bowl, the NetBase Passion Index churned out some surprising results.

According to their research that earmarks sentiment (like vs. dislike) and passion (love vs. hate) then plots them on a grid to show correlations, very few ads got the overall thumbs-down. Even Groupon, which anecdotally seemed to be the worst offender of audience tastes was plotted less passionate, but more likable.

NetBase Passion Index - Super Bowl AdsGoDaddy’s high like and high passion response is inevitably overshadowed by the ignorant men talking about boobs rather than whether or not they like the company, but that is what the research measures — reactions to the commercials rather than the companies.

Perhaps most surprising is that Chrysler’s emotional championing of Detroit is kinda middle of the road. People didn’t like or dislike, love or hate it. Obviously, the results would be different if you plotted only Michigan-area responses.

More people talked about the Doritos ads than any other. Theirs scored high in my opinion. I just like the humor. I know not everyone does which is probably why their plotted in the middle of the chart. BudLight is surprisingly higher on the like-dislike vertical scale in my opinion. For Budweiser, I thought their ads were a bust last night.

So what surpises you about the plotting here? Should Groupon be way down near the bottom? Why do you suppose it’s not? And if you want to question the methodology and searches, I’m certain Netbase is watching. They’ll be happy to fill you in.

The comments are yours.

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About Jason Falls

Jason Falls

Jason Falls is the founder and chief instigator for Social Media Explorer's blog. He is a leading thinker, speaker and strategist in the world of digital marketing and is co-author of two books, No Bullshit Social Media: The All-Business, No-Hype Guide To Social Media Marketing and The Rebel's Guide To Email Marketing. By day, he leads digital strategy for CafePress, one of the world's largest online retailers. His opinions are his, not necessarily theirs. Follow him on Twitter (@JasonFalls).

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Comments on Social Media Explorer are open to anyone. However, I will remove any comment that is disrespectful and not in the spirit of intelligent discourse. You are welcome to leave links to content relevant to the conversation, but I reserve the right to remove it if I don't see the relevancy. Be nice, have fun. Fair?

  • http://pop-pr.blogspot.com Jeremy Pepper

    A little surprised on a few things, but overall I don't think people “hate” things enough to actually say they hate it in a survey. Yes, flippantly on Twitter (eg, I hate Pizza Hut) but not in a more scientific way.

    I think Twitter, though, gives us a skewed microcosm. I noted last night that a few of the college students didn't like the “Imported from Detroit” commercial, so that commercial just being middle of the road isn't too surprising. And while most of the country was meh on Groupon, I think it's interesting to note that a good portion of their customers are probably Twitter users so that skewing might affect the company. But as a blip.

    And see – this is why I don't blog more often. Others, like you, say it well enough for me. ;)

  • http://pop-pr.blogspot.com Jeremy Pepper

    A little surprised on a few things, but overall I don't think people “hate” things enough to actually say they hate it in a survey. Yes, flippantly on Twitter (eg, I hate Pizza Hut) but not in a more scientific way.

    I think Twitter, though, gives us a skewed microcosm. I noted last night that a few of the college students didn't like the “Imported from Detroit” commercial, so that commercial just being middle of the road isn't too surprising. And while most of the country was meh on Groupon, I think it's interesting to note that a good portion of their customers are probably Twitter users so that skewing might affect the company. But as a blip.

    And see – this is why I don't blog more often. Others, like you, say it well enough for me. ;)

  • http://www.twitter.com/maartenvleeuwen Maarten van Leeuwen

    I like these kind of graphs. Find it hard to believe however that “we care” about these kind of ads that much that it's worth measuring :)

  • http://www.twitter.com/maartenvleeuwen Maarten van Leeuwen

    I like these kind of graphs. Find it hard to believe however that “we care” about these kind of ads that much that it's worth measuring :)

  • http://www.experiate.net Paul Flanigan

    I think a big influence on this is the number of ads each brand ran during the Super Bowl. I was busy wrangling my kids to catch too much, but my friends said that Budweiser (and BL) had at least four or five ads on. Did Doritos have as much? That frequency will certainly support the size of the metric above. It makes me wonder if GoDaddy or Groupon would be where they are on that chart had they run several ads during the game.

  • digitalvision

    Interesting. I look at my stream last night, and I can't tell you how many people were completely turned off by Groupon AND GoDaddy. I saw at least 10 “I'm closing my Groupon Account” tweets.

    Automated sentiment analysis I've found to be really fuzzy, no matter the vendor. Obviously, one needs to take additional data into account. For instance, the Chrysler ad is steaming (if not already past) 1.2 million views; and the Groupon ad is at 103k, obviously not getting as much additional repeat buzz. Not to mention the likes/dislikes on Youtube are overwhelmingly positive for Chrysler whereas negative for Groupon.

    I'm from Detroit, so I could be called biased. But let's bring out the Doritos ad. It has less than half the Youtube views as Chrysler and nowhere near the number of likes, although positive (576 vs. 10,500 likes for Chrysler). So this doesn't seem, from a snapshot, that this is on point. Obviously, Chrysler seems to have resonated a lot more and connected with an audience.

    This just doesn't feel right. It could be, sure, but rarely have I found automated sentiment analysis of any kind from anyone on point.

  • http://www.kherize5.com Suzanne Vara

    Jason

    What is interesting about this research is you look around and hear terrible things about the Groupon ad but yet it did not come near to hate. The Doritos commercials were very funny but yet are not ranking higher in the like. This research is certainly not what would have been predicted but the numbers do not lie.

    The Bud commercials I agree were a bust. Actually most of the ads were nothing special and unaided recall is almost non existent for many. So many of the advertisers are advertising daily and did not come to the plate with anything different to make us pay attention. The game was good at least to keep our interest as we know that the majority of the commercials did not.

  • http://DonnyGamble.com Donny Gamble

    The Internet can definitely measure the viral buzz that an offline marketing campaign might have

  • http://www.faqsoftwareagent.com Spencer from Faq Agent

    In my opinion Groupon is at the bottom because not a lot of people are interested with their ads, yes they like what they offer but they have to create interesting and more appealing ads. Doritos use humor but it works, why don't they try it some time.