Category archives for

– Digital Marketing –

How To Spot The Wrong Customer Perspective

by · May 12, 2014

In the checkout line at a national arts and crafts chain last week, I noticed a large red sign encouraging customers to sign up for the store’s email marketing program. Point-of-sale executions to encourage a deeper connection with the brand online are smart and help you reach the customer at multiple touch points, driving repeat business and loyalty.

But as I read the sign, my delight turned to despair for the brand. It was immediately clear to me the brand had the wrong customer perspective.

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How To Be An Instigator

by · May 5, 2014

It was ninth grade English class, first period, Layne Tackett, Pikeville High School, 1987. We were beginning a section on Shakespeare and Mr. Tackett, in his calculated and intimidating way said, pointing to a word he’d scribbled on the board, “This is doth. You will pronounce it ‘doth’ like moth. It is actually pronounced ‘duth’ like stuff. But you will mispronounce it. So let’s just get it over with and agree to say ‘doth’ so I don’t get aggravated that half of you are saying it correctly while the other half are not.”

I raised my hand.

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Defining What You Are, And Are Not

by · February 17, 2014

The Achille’s Heel of agencies is they often don’t know how to say, “no.” Clients ask them if they can launch a website. Yes! Can they write a speech? Yes! Can they manage a text campaign? Yes! Can they wrap a tour bus? Yes!

The problem is that more often than not, the correct answer an agency should give is, “no.” While there’s nothing wrong with finding a suitable vendor or third party to help the client, most agencies fear appearing incapable of anything, so they say, “yes!” and figure out how later.

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The Bitter Pill of Digital and Social Marketing Success

by · February 10, 2014

Think of the most important professional project you’ve ever been a part of. It doesn’t matter what business or industry, or for that matter what silo the work happened in. Just think of the big project that you look back on and say, “I’m proud to have been a part of that.”

Now ask yourself this question: Was it easy to pull off?

Most likely, the answer is, of course, “No.” Nothing worth doing is effortless.

Why then, do marketers and business owners alike come to conferences, read blog posts, attend webinars, read books and such, looking for an easy button? If it’s worth doing, it’s worth doing right. If it’s worth remembering, it wasn’t easy.

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Where Is Marketing And Where Is It Headed?

by · January 8, 2014

Exact Target released new research this morning that looks at the State of Marketing in 2014. The research, pulled from over 2,500 marketing professionals, has some interesting trends and developments that tell us a bit about where our own heads are and where many are moving.

As expected, the priority for marketers in 2014 is to drive increased conversion rates and improve brand awareness. Collecting and measuring behavioral data comes in third with the other two neck and neck, but those two are what marketers are typically charged with. What surprised me at first glance was that 61 percent of the respondents said the planned to increase spending for data and analytics, which was the highest among other areas. Certainly, quantifying and qualifying success is important, but this category in the lead may indicate that marketers are not satisfied in understanding of what they get in return.

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Before You Answer, Ask

by · December 31, 2013

When people are aggravated or even upset, the natural reaction is to verbalize what they would do differently or what they think should be done to fix whatever the problem is. “Why can’t you just deliver my package?!” “I would have thought about the holiday rush ahead of time and hired more people!”

Not that these particular quotes have come up in conversation recently or anything. Heh.

What I find fascinating about these moments when people interject their solution to whatever problem you face is that knee jerks are always uninformed. But it works for us as well as customers. When we say, “Well, I would do X,” or “Why didn’t you do Y,” we’re just as uniformed as the frustrated customer.

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The Secret To Not Caring What’s Next

by · December 16, 2013

Social media emerged because consumers wanted to control their media environment. The confluence of dot-com developers, freshly out of work, realizing they needed to get more people on the web if they wanted to rebuild their jobs, and a growing consumer distaste for greedy corporations barking at them, produced the perfect temperature for social media platforms to take hold and grow.

Blogs trumped news sites because there were no pop-ups, paywalls or flashing ad-scapes. Social networks trumped television or radio for consumer time spent because there was more than one-way communication and it was mostly void of “buy this” or “click here!”

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Ultimate Guide to Blog Comments [Infographic]

by · December 11, 2013

When done properly, leaving comments on other people’s blogs can be an effective way for bloggers to build relationships, increase brand awareness and grow readership.

The infographic below was inspired by The Ultimate Guide to Leaving Comments on Blogs, a great post written by Darren Rowse of Problogger.

This visualization highlights the benefits of leaving blog comments, describes the four different personality types of blog commenters, and lists the DOs and DON’Ts of effective blog commenting.

I’d love to get your thoughts. Are there any other points you would add? What are some of your positive or negative experiences with blog commenting?

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Are Our Choices Making Us Miserable?

by · December 2, 2013

Our recent discussion of Less or More — an essay on consumer research that says customers want multiple choices when making purchases — lead us to think that simplifying user experiences online may be counterintuitive to a fault. Making our websites and applications more direct paths to common successes and less about giving the customer the opportunity to navigate their own path, could be the sword we digital marketers fall upon.

However, as I’ve continued to ponder this notion of choice or simplicity for customers, I’ve begun to come a realization about my own media habits: Less is better.

5 comments