Category archives for

– Social Media Measurement –

Don’t Let Goals Get In The Way Of Your Success

by · May 3, 2013

I was at a party the other week talking to an old friend that had recently launched a startup. He was sharing some interesting statistics on the growth of the startup, that they have increased sales by X and clients by Y.  In all, it was very positive news. After a few minutes of conversation, I asked him whether or not the business was successful. I was expecting a short and simple, “Yes!”  Instead what I received was a rehashing of the metrics he had already shared. Having known him for a while, I felt comfortable stopping him mid-sentence asking, “It’s great that you’re meeting all these goals and objectives, but does that mean your startup is successful?

His response, “I don’t know.”

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The Most Bogus Metric

by · April 26, 2013

I love Twitter. I really do. Even when I have a beef with it, I recognize that it is an amazing tool connecting people and businesses and cultures and organizations and thoughts and ideas and revolutionaries. And it was built by a small conclave of guys who had no idea what it would grow up to be.

But there is a gap in our measurements, and it’s one that Twitter might make some real money while fixing the most bogus metric of all.

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In Praise of Vanity Metrics

by · April 4, 2013

In a recent Velocity Content Marketing Hangout, Joe Chernov said something interesting. In fact, he said very little that wasn’t interesting. But this one made me raise an eyebrow that took a while to come back down.

Joe said, “Don’t knock vanity metrics. Sometimes they’re all you’ve got.” (or something like that).

I had just been writing a spoof post that put all vanity metrics into one big infographic hierarchy (provisional title: ‘Ego Candy’). But Joe’s little side remark made me press pause on that one and write this one instead.

Because, of course, he’s right (it’s annoying how right Joe tends to be).

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Good Digital Marketing = Good Math

by · February 25, 2013

Ask good e-commerce or search marketing professionals how they build successful programs and you’ll hear them discuss things like conversion rates. Conversion rates are the percentage of a total audience that takes an action. I’ll take that a step further toward clarity and say that “conversion rate” is reserved for a monetary transaction. For other activities you try to motivate and measure (filling out forms, social sharing, answering questions and etc.), I prefer to use the term “action rate.” 

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Tools, Process and Culture…Oh My!

by · December 26, 2012

Everywhere I go and speak, I ask the same two questions before I start my presentation.  The first question I ask is, “How many of you trust social media as a data source to make business decision?  Please raise your hand if you do.”  You know how many people’s hands go up after I ask this question?  About 5-10% of the room.  And when I ask this question, the room is filled with at a minimum 100 people all the way to 500 people.  After asking this question, I follow it with a second one.  I ask, “Ok, so when you are thinking of buying a new electronic device or appliance or picking a restaurant to make a decision, how many of you go to the web first to collect information to make your decision?”  Now everyone’s hand goes up.  Well at least 98% of them…the other 2% are sleeping.

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Autodesk Scores a Home Run with Gamification

by · November 8, 2012

When most people think about social media they immediately jump to Facebook or Twitter. However, some of the best companies are looking at social media in a different way. They are spending time figuring out how they can leverage social behaviors with their audience to meet their goals. Autodesk is doing just that. Rather than only focusing on social networks, they are taking social integration to a new level. They are building it into core decision points in their prospect lifecycle. Figuring out how to deeply integrate social elements into a company’s products, services, and business processes is where the most innovative companies are moving and Autodesk is certainly leading the charge in their industry.

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The ROI of Infographics

by · August 1, 2012

Defining the best way to measure the value of your infographic content can be an adventure in semantics. Your objectives, the organizational culture you operate in, and your definition of return on investment (ROI) all contribute to how, or even if, you measure the business performance of infographics.

ROI is calculated as follows: (Gain from an investment – Cost of the investment) / Cost of the investment

The formula is simple enough. So why do ROI discussions always seem to have the potential to become acrimonious? Like a good political debate, how you approach the measurement of your content marketing and communication initiatives can depend on your perspective.

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Is Facebook Anti-ROI for Brands?

by · July 26, 2012

Does anyone else feel like Facebook is making it really difficult for brands to be successful? Or do you feel like Facebook is on your side? Personally, I feel like Facebook has become disconnected from what brands are trying to achieve and they keep making it more difficult to be able to prove the ROI of having a Facebook presence. Why would brands invest big dollars into a platform that seems to constantly turn its nose up at their efforts? Further, how can we ever get the budgets we need to make additional investments if Facebook has an anti-ROI policy for brands?

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Metavana Mix: Social Complexity, SparkScore Simplicity

by · July 20, 2012

Metavana is a new-on-the-scene semantic-analysis vendor whose core science invokes a supposed universal descriptive pattern, the Maximum Information Principle. MIP, Metavana explains, describes the distribution of galaxy sizes and, as exploited by Metavana’s software, the distribution of multi-term, natural-language “n-plets.”

Interesting, but there’s plenty of computational-linguistics and semantic-science mojo in a host of established, competing text and sentiment analysis offerings, developed by smart people. The real question is this one: Does MIP make for great “solutions that measure customer satisfaction,” capable of “taming the chaos of the social Web”?

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