So I’ve started working a bit with the folks at Keepio, a new social commerce offering that allows you to inventory items you own (think collectors) and share them with a trusted network of friends. But it also allows you to sell them, trade them or even have a platform to let your friends see what you might have they can borrow (think lawn equipment). Because it’s not just an eBay (all about selling) and the premise is to connect and do this with your trusted network of friend (not with anyone like Craig’s List), I think Keepio might be the first pure social commerce play in the space.

I spent some time last weekend using their handy “email a photo” feature to snap pictures of some sports collectibles I have. It was super easy to load items into your collections. You can set up different collections to organize your DVDs separately from your baseball cards or romance novels or gadgets. I’ve even sold my old iPhone 3G using Keepio because you can place an item on the “Marketplace” and make it public for anyone to see.

Perhaps the coolest thing about Keepio is they don’t take a transaction fee if you buy through their site. They think of themselves as just the meeting place, not the store. Their plan is to generate revenue with relevant, targeted offers to users. So, if you buy a big screen TV and put that in your collection, they might deliver an advertisement to you for a service plan or warranty. They also offer white-label versions so insurance companies, churches, etc., can build inventory and trusted community ecosystems for their customers or members.

You can read more of my exploration of Keepio on a guest post I wrote for InsiderLouisville.com here.

Instead of pounding out more description, I thought it might be useful to just show you what it looks like.

Keepio is a Louisville-based startup run by my friend Dave Durand, Jesse Lucas, Jon Shaw and my business partner in Exploring Social Media, Nick Huhn. I’m not hiding the fact I’m biased here, but would love your take on Keepio. The reason I’ve signed on to work with them on some marketing and public relations is because I believe it is pure social commerce – that with your trusted networks. It’s not just adding a store to a Facebook page.

But hold me to task on this, gang. What do you think of Keepio? Is it a niche site for collectors or something bigger than can bring social commerce to life for average folks. The comments are yours.

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About Jason Falls

Jason Falls

Jason Falls is a leading thinker, speaker and strategist in the world of digital marketing and is co-author of two books, No Bullshit Social Media: The All-Business, No-Hype Guide To Social Media Marketing and The Rebel's Guide To Email Marketing. By day, he leads digital strategy for Elasticity, one of the world's most innovative digital marketing and public relations firms. Follow him on Twitter (@JasonFalls).

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Comments & Reactions

Comments Policy

Comments on Social Media Explorer are open to anyone. However, I will remove any comment that is disrespectful and not in the spirit of intelligent discourse. You are welcome to leave links to content relevant to the conversation, but I reserve the right to remove it if I don't see the relevancy. Be nice, have fun. Fair?

  • http://www.all-themeparks.com Jenny Esponda

    that's really cool Jason… I mean you r getting a platform to chat and interact with friends as well as to show them what you have recently bought or liked ans similarly allow them to buy that product too… and also its good news that they are not charging any transaction fee.. which is a bonus I must say…!!!! it's really a cool stuff and surely gonna rock!!!

    • http://socialmediaexplorer.com JasonFalls

      Thanks, Jenny. I think it offers something cool that's not out there at

      present. We'll see if the market agrees.

  • http://twitter.com/tooncreative Justin Toon

    My only concern about this service is personal security. I assume it's very secure and difficult for potential thieves to get personal information about users such as street address.

    • http://nickhuhn.com nickhuhn

      This is a valid concern, Justin, and one we're addressing head-on. While we don't ask for or store sensitive information like your home address, we also want to ensure that the environment can be accommodating of those that might want to share that with other members via our Messaging system. Our aim is to connect friends with friends in the same vicinity in the hopes that transactions can be settled up off-line over a cup of coffee, for example, and less like traditional marketplaces in which Shipping can cause headaches.

      Nevertheless, the entire site will be SSL-enabled in the next few weeks so that all communications, items, and profile information from members are more secure and encrypted. We take privacy very and security seriously on Keepio, and we want to be accommodating of any issues like the one you mentioned.

      Please let me know if you have any additional questions or feedback. Thanks, Justin!

  • http://www.cygnismedia.com/ Facebook Applications

    one of the kool video i ever seen thanks for sharing social media rocks the world …

  • http://www.govirtualmarketing.com/ourprocess.html Search Engine Company

    Restricting opportunities for followers to comment on posts and provide feedback defeats one of the key uses of Social Media – gathering real-time wants, needs & expectations of consumers.

  • http://www.socialigration.com Social Commerce

    Really wild approach with Keepio, but will it really gain traction such that people perceive value from it?  I think that’s debatable.