Did you enjoy this blog post? If so, then why not:Leave Comment Below | Subscribe To This Blog | Sign Up For Our Newsletter |

About Eric Brown

Eric Brown

Eric Brown's background is rooted in the rental and real estate industries. He founded metro Detroit’s Urbane Apartments in 2003, after serving as senior vice president for a major Midwest apartment developer. He established a proven track record of effectively repositioning existing rental properties in a way that added value for investors while enhancing the resident experience. He also established The Urbane Way, a social media marketing and PR laboratory, where innovative marketing ideas are tested.

Other posts by

Comments & Reactions

Comments Policy

Comments on Social Media Explorer are open to anyone. However, I will remove any comment that is disrespectful and not in the spirit of intelligent discourse. You are welcome to leave links to content relevant to the conversation, but I reserve the right to remove it if I don't see the relevancy. Be nice, have fun. Fair?

  • http://paramountessays.com/ buy essay

    Great!

  • Pingback: Weekly Link Round Up – 01-13-12 | Social Media Marketing

  • http://occamsrazr.com Ike Pigott

    Eric, I agree with your entire line of thinking, but I’m growing dark on the conclusion. I can only speak from my anecdotal experience, but the myriad of accounts that keep adding me to circles on Google Plus are not people I know, and in my humble role as a BS-account sniffer, I fear most of them are created to poison the SEO pool.

    The fight order whether Google was going to require “real person names” for accounts was about the authenticity of the sharing. However, the Violet Blues and others who operate under pen names rightfully fought back for their right to exist and thrive with privacy intact. That, in my opinion, was a big blow to Google’s plans to accelerate the Sharing emphasis in G+.

    It’s a pickle.

    • http://urbanemedia.co/ Urbane Media

      Good Morning Ike, Thank you for weighing in. I have heard before that marketers tend to screw up the pie, or something like that. That said, irrespective of how business may already be gaming Google +, in your opinion, is it a viable marketing option for small business?

      • http://occamsrazr.com Ike Pigott

        It *could* be viable, but not as a primary driver. Getting on Google Plus isn’t going to do a thing for a company that doesn’t have an established web presence already. Beyond that, it’s a function of how much business you’re getting from organic search.
        Look at your revenues.

        Segment out your business from “new leads.”

        Factor in your typical loyalty rate for new leads.

        Also take into account how much you spend on new lead generation (if indeed you do.)
        Now, if you’re in the kind of business where you are reliant on people finding you, this could be a big deal. I’m thinking mechanics or heating and air companies.
        I’m just saying the ROI is pretty easy to calculate, but the X factor is how much time you’re going to have to invest, and will there be enough fresh content to generate/share? A heating/air company might have a monthly newsletter about tips and reminders for cleaning and air quality, but generating the kind of “sharing churn” that will out-duel the coming wave of PlusSpamSEO might be more trouble than it’s worth. (which means the ROI of doing it yourself is LESS than the cost of hiring a black hat PlusSpamSEO weasel to game it for you.)

  • http://occamsrazr.com Ike Pigott

    Eric, I agree with your entire line of thinking, but I’m growing dark on the conclusion. I can only speak from my anecdotal experience, but the myriad of accounts that keep adding me to circles on Google Plus are not people I know, and in my humble role as a BS-account sniffer, I fear most of them are created to poison the SEO pool.

    The fight order whether Google was going to require “real person names” for accounts was about the authenticity of the sharing. However, the Violet Blues and others who operate under pen names rightfully fought back for their right to exist and thrive with privacy intact. That, in my opinion, was a big blow to Google’s plans to accelerate the Sharing emphasis in G+.

    It’s a pickle.

  • Anonymous

    There’s one solution… provide great content.

  • Anonymous

    There’s one solution… provide great content.

    • http://occamsrazr.com Ike Pigott

      That’s a solution. So is buying a Learjet, and running a banner behind it. The question becomes “What’s the ROI?”

      Let’s say you’re a plumber, and you happen to get a few leads per month off your website. Google suddenly changes the landscape, and now your site is beginning to slip.

      Do you:

      A) spend several hours every month trying to write engaging and thought-provoking content about plumbing and fixtures?

      B) hire someone to write several compelling posts per month about plumbing and fixtures?

      or C) hire some company that will create Google+ accounts and do enough sharing of viral stuff that it will point back to your site?

      Honestly — the upshot of all of this is the death of the small-business blog. Why bother? Create a Google+ account, use IT as your blog, post about whatever, and share it.

      Same ROI as a company blog, less hosting hassles, and more juice.

      • Anonymous

        At first glance, they all seem like viable options depending on the type of company you have. If you’re one with a really small budget and “get your hands dirty” mentality, like many plumbers are, then option A is going to seem more valid. If, like me, you think the system of economy works best when everyone is playing their specific role, B might work best. But I think that in the long run, Google will be able to (similar to giving less credit to those that duplicate posts) weed out those accounts made only to prop up search results for others.
        I have no idea how… Yelp’s got a pretty good system going with trolls creating accounts simply to bash on the boards. Maybe it’s a community policed system like that. I mean, Google is doing this only to help Google +, right? And does the system of allowing organizations to manipulate G+ help G+ in any way? If anything, it completely bastardizes the entire community… something for which I’m certain those much-smarter-at-the-intertubes-than-me people have already considered and created a solution.

        You are right about company blogs, though. Buh bye.

        • http://occamsrazr.com Ike Pigott

          To clarify:  Company blogs that were started to enhance SEO are toast.

          Those that actually engage and build communities, trust and loyalty?  Spot on.

  • http://www.communicationartistry.ca/ Marnie Hughes

    I agree with Matthew. Provide great content. In my opinion, sometimes that’s something I’ve written and sometimes it’s a post like this. Balance it out and put out information you think people will truly appreciate reading (even if it is a link to someone else’s words). Is that a naive philosophy?

    • http://urbanemedia.co/ Urbane Media

      Hi Marnie, Thank you for stopping by. Your comment, and Matt’s aren’t a naive philosophy, and as with all marketing, do something remarkable and you get the prize. That said, there is so much noise in the space that great content alone may not be enough. 

       

  • Anonymous

    I know so many bloggers who produce great content but it doesn’t get shared in large volumes. Big branded blogs receive so much attention through social media channels that it is very easy to miss the smaller publishers with equally big ideas.

  • http://twitter.com/RCONNOR111 ROBERT CONNOR III

    Glad you could help detroit with the urbane apartments…..Have a great day on purpose! Go Tigers.

  • http://www.callbox.com.my/ Christine Steffensen

    Hi Eric,

    I agree with your thoughts. I will find simply those are rare individuals who possess that willingness in molding an helping other folks. They devote amount of time in sharing their skills unselfishly. They have that essentials desire for service.