If you are a regular reader here at Social Media Explorer, you know that I’m a strategic advisor to Compendium Blogware and have been involved in a corporate blogging research project with Compendium CEO Chris Baggott, corporate blogging expert Debbie Weil and fellow social media marketing practitioner Jay Baer. Our research to date has shown that as many as 80 percent of corporate blogs report that the vast majority of their traffic comes from first-time visitors, erasing the myth that we blog for some loyal community.

Image representing Compendium Blogware as depi...

This means your corporate blog is better off if you focus on blogging to win search results since the majority of visitors are either coming from referring sites or search results. As a result of this research, I’ve focused some energy discussing search engine optimization and your blog here. But I haven’t done you a full service by telling you more about Compendium, which by the way, is a pretty darn good corporate blogging solution.

Admittedly, I’ve been hesitant to do so because I’m working with them. They’re paying me for my role in the research, a recent webinar I did with them on the Myth of the Repeat Visitor, some strategic counsel for their social media activities and more. I can’t talk about Compendium without telling you I’m biased. But if you are a frequent reader (which even my analytics tells me the majority of you are not, so you’ll have to trust me on this), you probably know that I don’t endorse or recommend anything I wouldn’t use myself.

A couple of weeks ago, I told you about a keyword targeting exercise I performed on this blog using Scribe SEO (affiliate link). I use Scribe SEO because my blog platform is WordPress and it is pretty simple to use and relatively inexpensive (currently $27 per month, I believe). While I do not use Compendium for Social Media Explorer, I have recommended it to more than one client, and even before I had a relationship with the company. I’ve also recommended it to several companies who have simply asked my opinion on blogging platforms.

The main differences in the two lie in simplicity and price. Scribe SEO is clunky in that you write your post, analyze (using one of your allotment for the month), then improve. If you then re-analyze to make sure you’ve improved it well, you use another of your monthly allotment for analysis. If you are optimizing a blog post per day or more, your price goes up. Granted, you can still get a healthy amount of analysis for less than a few hundred dollars per year, but the way Scribe works, you can’t tell if you’ve done a good job, or improved on the first set of recommendations without burning another turn.

Compendium, on the other hand, works in real time, moving a red-to-green bar as you type your post, telling you if your post has good (green) or bad (red) keyword density. If you paste pre-written copy into the tool, it gives you the read out so you can adjust accordingly. (Click the screen cast below to see a larger version.)

Compendium Blogware screen capture

Compendium also lists keywords you are targeting in your post entry area, so you don’t have to reference charts and graphs or spreadsheets. It’s right there while you type or edit.

Certainly, the differences are more vast. Scribe SEO is a plugin you use with an existing blog platform. Compendium is a full blog platform. It’s better suited for corporate blogs and larger-scale search engine optimization efforts. Their system turns typically author-centric methods of blogging into keyword topic-centric, multiple blogs that go after search engine results with more efficiency … and success. A couple of examples of that success have been covered here and here.

The bottom line here is that I think Scribe SEO is great for individual bloggers trying to win some keyword searches or for corporate blogs using WordPress or one of the platforms Scribe supports. But if your company’s primary (or even secondary) purpose is to win search results for a number of keywords (Compendium charges by the keyword targeted – expect an entry-level price around $1,000 per month), you’re not going to find a blog platform better suited to accomplish that.

For more insights on corporate blogging, Compendium’s next webinar features Debbie Weil and is focused on the top misconceptions of corporate blogging. I highly recommend you attend. Debbie is brilliant and wrote the book (literally) on corporate blogging long before many corporations would consider it.

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About Jason Falls

Jason Falls

Jason Falls is the founder and chief instigator for Social Media Explorer's blog. He is a leading thinker, speaker and strategist in the world of digital marketing and is co-author of two books, No Bullshit Social Media: The All-Business, No-Hype Guide To Social Media Marketing and The Rebel's Guide To Email Marketing. By day, he leads digital strategy for CafePress, one of the world's largest online retailers. His opinions are his, not necessarily theirs. Follow him on Twitter (@JasonFalls).

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Comments & Reactions

Comments Policy

Comments on Social Media Explorer are open to anyone. However, I will remove any comment that is disrespectful and not in the spirit of intelligent discourse. You are welcome to leave links to content relevant to the conversation, but I reserve the right to remove it if I don't see the relevancy. Be nice, have fun. Fair?

  • jeffespo

    This needed a re-read on my part. An earlier tweet that I put out was blogging for search instead of content. The real beauty of both these tools is that they can help make your content more effective.

    While I did the quick read in my email, I would argue that the post could help some advertising partners within an organization to show value in optimization over content.

  • Craig Jones

    Not sure if I'd want to be associated with (or use the products of) a company that only pays $5 per blog post to content writers for them…

    http://compendiumblogware.myexacthire.com/ViewJ

    • http://socialmediaexplorer.com JasonFalls

      If they can get the writers for that, what's the issue?

      • Craig Jones

        How about taking advantage? They charge $1,000 per month for their product (starting price) yet they can't pay a decent wage to the guys that fill their content page? Typical corporate greed.

        If you look at the two example links on their job posting, the blog posts range in length. Say you do get 2-3 posts per hour, going by their job description. That's only $15 per hour, and I'm guessing that doesn't take into account any research the blogger has to do on their topic?

        Then there's the longer post, so that might mean you only get one or two in an hour, so you then drop down to $5 to $10 per hour for the content?

        Come on, Jason, you're saying this is acceptable? I'm disappointed.

        • http://socialmediaexplorer.com JasonFalls

          At that rate, they'll get what they pay for. I wouldn't work for that
          but if someone else wants to and Compendium or their clients think the
          work is acceptable, I have a hard time having a problem with it.

        • http://blogging.compendiumblog.com/blog/blogging-best-practices chrisbaggott

          Sorry to be late to this conversation. A couple of things to consider about the $5 post. First of all a lot of people like this kind of work. Most of this is actually in Content editing. Our clients get a lot of user generated stories that come in. To those stories they may want to include links for example to the products or services mentioned…perhaps a product picture etc…

          This isn't Hemingway, this is a post about a refrigerator or something. This discussion gets back to understanding your audience and what they want and expect. As Jason has mentioned before, the reality is that for most blogs the vast majority of 'readers' are first time visitors.

          What do these visitors want and expect? They want content that matches their search query and helps solve their problem. If they are looking for refrigerators and you are in the refrigerator business then the best content you can create for this audience is about the refrigerators you carry, the use cases for various refrigerators, people who have previously purchased refrigerators, prices and sales, locations etc…. (ok Jason, if you suddenly start winning appliance searches I'm sorry!)

          The point is that there are lots of smart people who know a lot about these appliances (think stay at home mom's) and can do the research and write great content. Who's the judge? The Audience! The audience will tell you if they like your posts….they tell you by clicking through.

  • http://budurl.com/ynfr Megan Zuniga

    I like the green to red content bar. A program telling you if your post is good enough. It's cute and handy. @Craig Jones, it's called business. Yes, it sounds bad and you don't have to like it. But if their products do you great service, what's wrong with it?

  • lucdesaulniers

    As a corporate Marketing and Communication Director, I question a few things regarding 1/ Social Media experts and 2/ SM Content providers. First, I see, read and hear a lot of individuals calling themselves experts in social media. On what basis? What are their credentials other then self claimed status? They blog? They follow others or retweet others comments without any further analysis? For what one can observed, it's pretty much based on perception. 2/ You tell me how someone who doesn't know my company, my product, my market can provide insightful information to my clients? I seriously think that if social media is to be considered meaningful, it should regulates the self-proclaimed experts by setting guidelines before calling themselves “experts”, for their own credibility and for confirming the value of their marketing input (read ROI).

    • http://socialmediaexplorer.com JasonFalls

      I don't disagree with you. Not sure what that has to do with this topic, but
      I agree that no one has the right to call themselves an expert. I've been
      called that, but never asked for or gave myself that title. I help companies
      move their business. Social media is part of that.

      • lucdesaulniers

        I understand I was a little bit out of topic. But, I was referring to comments and answers by or to Craig Jones.

  • http://blogging.compendiumblog.com/blog/blogging-best-practices chrisbaggott

    Sorry to be late to this conversation. A couple of things to consider about the $5 post. First of all a lot of people like this kind of work. Most of this is actually in Content editing. Our clients get a lot of user generated stories that come in. To those stories they may want to include links for example to the products or services mentioned…perhaps a product picture etc…

    This isn't Hemingway, this is a post about a refrigerator or something. This discussion gets back to understanding your audience and what they want and expect. As Jason has mentioned before, the reality is that for most blogs the vast majority of 'readers' are first time visitors.

    What do these visitors want and expect? They want content that matches their search query and helps solve their problem. If they are looking for refrigerators and you are in the refrigerator business then the best content you can create for this audience is about the refrigerators you carry, the use cases for various refrigerators, people who have previously purchased refrigerators, prices and sales, locations etc…. (ok Jason, if you suddenly start winning appliance searches I'm sorry!)

    The point is that there are lots of smart people who know a lot about these appliances (think stay at home mom's) and can do the research and write great content. Who's the judge? The Audience! The audience will tell you if they like your posts….they tell you by clicking through.

  • Pingback: A Corporate Blogging Platform Worth Blogging AboutCorporate Digital Marketing | Corporate Digital Marketing

  • jp jp

    I would choose Colleags.com (http://www.colleags.com) as it creates corporate blog automatically once any corporate email account is verified. It’s like Facebook’s signup process. One thing I like about this site is its forum style main page.