Posts tagged as:

content strategy

Content is King: How to Land a Royal Flush with your Content Strategy

by · May 18, 2015

Can you hear that? That’s the buzz of the Internet swarming around content marketing. The field is increasing so quickly that Google search results for ‘content marketing’ outnumber those of ‘Barack Obama’ by more than a third. Given its track record for business success, more and more companies are boosting their online content efforts hoping they’ll win big. However not all content is created equal. You can’t expect to win on the big pots with low pairs or an ace-high alone. Content curation is an art of its own and only the right amount of training—paired with real life experience—will increase your chances for a big win.

2 comments

This Post Is For You

by · April 30, 2015

Spoiler: This post is right up your alley. How do I know? Let’s just say I have done my research.

As marketers, we often think we understand our target audience. We think we know what kind of content they want, and we also think we know what topics they find interesting. No one creates content assuming it’s off the mark; instead, we assume that our effort is worth something (interest, buzz, value, connection, etc.).

Turns out, we assume a lot, primarily that we’re hitting the mark. And maybe our assumptions are correct…but wouldn’t it be great if we could prove it? We can. Here’s how.

3 comments

Treasure Maps and Shovels

by · March 11, 2015

It’s throwback week here at Social Media Explorer. Here’s another treasure from 2014 that we think you’ll enjoy:

Treasure maps get all the glory. After all, without a treasure map, how else is the young adventurer  supposed to find where that chest of doubloons is buried.  X marks the spots, you know the drill. But what about the lowly shovel. Though never taking center stage in any story, the shovel is still a necessary part of the treasure gaining process. Without a shovel, how are you supposed to dig up the buried treasure? Without a shovel, a treasure map is essentially worthless.

Sure you know where the gold is buried, but without a shovel you have no way of getting to it.

Coincidentally, your content strategy is a lot like a treasure map. Obviously you aren’t going to find your content strategy stuffed inside an empty rum bottle; but like a treasure map, your content strategy does outline the steps you need to take to find true content success.

However, a content strategy will only take you so far. I’ve seen too many people create a content strategy and then assume that success is already theirs, “We’ve got our content strategy right here! The gold is ours!” A strategy is only part of the success equation, at some point you’re going to need to put down the map and start digging. 

0 comments

My Inner Crybaby Is Crying Uncle

by · February 17, 2015

Awards season is ad season, as well. What began with #Downerbowl will end with the Oscars, and we will all be able to see that this year, the theme in agency land was creating emotion. Much like a few years back, it was trying to convince brands to be human. Both of these themes are really close to being successful, yet they miss the mark in my mind. A brand cannot be human. It should instead try to be useful. It is more attainable and reasonable. A brand is not human; it is a business. And if it is a good business, it offers products and services that are useful to people. Therefore, useful should be the place from which the brand communicates. As for creating emotion, this one was soooo close I could taste it. The miss was this: creating emotion for the sake of emotion is manipulative and off-putting.

0 comments

Yet Another Case for Curation

by · January 7, 2015

Last year, all I wanted for Christmas was to have the “80/20 rule” become standard. Clearly I was on the “Naughty List” as this did not come true. For those of you who are new to the “80/20 rule”, the idea is that 80% of your social posts should be designed to deliver value to the audience. This content should be curated from other sources and aligned with your brand’s mission, vision and values. The other 20% of your content can be about you and your brand. The idea is that if you spend 80% of your updates on content that is valuable to your audience; you will earn the right to talk about yourself. Problem is, we preach it. Heck everyone preaches it! But far too few brands and companies do it. Go ahead, go and audit your posts right now. I bet the best you did was 50%. I understand why. It is easier to talk about you and it is also easier to do that when leadership is reading because they want you to talk about their company. But, the reality is the more you talk about you, the more your updates become ignorable noise.

7 comments

Focusing to level up

by · September 18, 2014

Fall for me is more of a new year. I have always been mentally on a school calendar. Fall means taking a look at things anew. I don’t make many New Year’s Resolutions because I do most of my assessments in the fall at back-to-school time. And in the spirit of leaves turning, let’s take a look at where we are to start thinking about where we can go next.

How can we graduate from where we are to get closer to where we want to be?

5 comments

Consider the trusted resource

by · August 21, 2014

A few weeks back Nichole Kelly wrote a series about ego and social and it took me a few weeks to really marinate in her words, the thing that I keep coming back to is this: We are overshooting social media. If the idea was to connect people with people with more immediacy than ever realized before, the opportunity for brands was to transition from monolog to dialog. It is simple. Have a conversation with your customer. Answer their questions. Take care of them when they need you. Occasionally introduce them to new products and services, but mostly, offer them an opportunity to dialog. It is something I like to see from my favorite brands. I like to get ideas for my home and get inspiration for dinner from my favorite brands.

13 comments

Is Ego Coming Between the Value You Could Offer Your Audience?

by · July 30, 2014

In the post “Is your ego driving your social presence”, I asked how often you promote yourself or your brand as an indicator of whether or not ego is driving your presence. This is a pretty big topic that really needed its own conversation because we’ve all been self-promotional in social channels. So I thought it was a good time to dive deeper and get to the heart of self-promotion so we could analyze value versus ego, when to share, when not to share, and how to know if it was really about you or about your audience.

First, it’s important to have a discussion about self-promotion and why we do it. The reality for many of us is that we have social presences for our brands and ourselves because we wanted another distribution channel to drive traffic to something. It could be our blog, our products, our website, or some other web property. After all, that was the promise of social from the beginning, right? And the only way we can actually deliver on that promise is to promote things that will drive that traffic.

Is self-promotion all bad? That’s definitely up for debate. The only way we can have a healthy debate on the topic is to take a deep look at how much value we really provide to our audience when we self-promote.

0 comments

Content Lessons From The Real Pros

by · July 21, 2014

Saturday night’s Dwight Yoakam show at the annual Forecastle Festival in Louisville was my fourth or fifth time seeing him. Not many famous people hail from my hometown, and fellow Pikevillians tend to keep track of the ones that do.

One subtlety I noticed about Yoakum’s performance this time around that was different than my previous concerts was the choice of material. Yoakam and band played a wide variety of his hits from as far back as Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc., Etc., his first album from 1986. At previous shows, he played mostly songs from whatever album he was touring to support with a handful of hits from throughout the years. He has always done a medley tribute to Buck Owens, including Streets of Bakersfield, but pretty much sticks to the current LP’s tunes.

0 comments