Posts tagged as:

WOM

The Secret To Not Caring What’s Next

by · December 16, 2013

Social media emerged because consumers wanted to control their media environment. The confluence of dot-com developers, freshly out of work, realizing they needed to get more people on the web if they wanted to rebuild their jobs, and a growing consumer distaste for greedy corporations barking at them, produced the perfect temperature for social media platforms to take hold and grow.

Blogs trumped news sites because there were no pop-ups, paywalls or flashing ad-scapes. Social networks trumped television or radio for consumer time spent because there was more than one-way communication and it was mostly void of “buy this” or “click here!”

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Word of Mouth Marketing

by · May 11, 2011

Word of mouth marketing (WOMM) has the power to quickly build up or tear down the reputations of products, services and organizations.

Although many brand stories are shared offline, word of mouth can also spread very rapidly through social media. In order to leverage the power of WOM brands need to understand the dynamics of this intangible and often elusive form of marketing.

Building Trust

Trust lies at the core of every strong personal relationship – the same goes for relationships stakeholders have with brands. The driving force behind consumers’ desire to share positive stories about organizations is the trust they have in the products, services and people associated with those entities.

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How To Light My Fire: Authentic Word of Mouth Movements

by · January 20, 2011

Last week there was some really good discussion going on over at the Brains On Fire blog.  Seems that UnMarketer (Scott Stratten) made a video recommendation to his tribe.  He suggested they all go out quick and buy the book, “Brains On Fire:  Igniting Powerful, Sustainable Word of Mouth Movements.”  Tom Moradpour accepted the torch and went head down, then later posted a book review of his own.  He rated it pretty highly at 4 out of 5 stars, but had some lingering points he believed warranted more discussion.  How can teams defend Movements to the C-suite so that they are seen as legitimate business pursuits?  And how can you gain the resources and budget to really start the fire, instead of just warming things up? Good questions indeed.

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