If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Fault
If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Fault
by
Jason Falls
Jason Falls

According to an article in AdWeek and a survey conducted by recruiting firm Heidrick & Struggles, chief marketing officers are unhappy with their digital strategies. H&S polled 111 senior marketing executives at firms with $1 billion or more in annual revenues to come up with the “kinda sucks” prerogative. This essentially means they polled people who are used to spending a LOT of money on advertising who think the web space under-serves.

Apples to oranges.

Apples & Oranges - They Don't Compare
Image by TheBusyBrain via Flickr

And it’s not just the fact that digital activation is intrinsically different than traditional advertising. It’s that the entire focus and purpose of it are genetically divergent.

Traditional advertising is about a one-way line of communications. Brands blast messages to the masses in hopes a certain percentage of them buy … or recall … or think happy thoughts of them. Digital communications has now become a world more focused on conversation and engagement rather than the delivery of messaging. These are long-haul propositions.

Consumers will not trust your brand after one week of providing engaging content or compelling online material. They won’t trust your brand after one month, either. But hold down the fort for three, six or nine months, without suddenly shifting behavior or strategy, and you will start to see the growth in your investment online.

CMOs are unhappy because their attention spans are as abbreviated as their consumer’s. They want instant results, quick fixes and here and now solutions. Social media, and, similarly, online communications, is not only not an instant fix for genetic brand problems, but requires an investment of both time and resources to be played out consistently.

Simply put, CMOs should have been investing the time and attention into a long-term relationship with their customers well before the economy sagged and digital became more fiscally responsible. As such, they aren’t getting the residual benefit from creating an ongoing relationship with their most ardent fans. They see digital as a “campaign” or a short-term solution. It is … if the agency just wants to pacify the client. If you’re doing a good job for and with your client, however, you are building a digital behavior, not campaign, that proves over time that your brand can be counted on for compelling content and customer service that adds value to the online time spent by its fans.

My guess is the 111 senior marketing executives surveyed are dissatisfied because they’ve only focused on digital for three or four months. Stay the course, don’t rip and flip just because your quarter-to-quarter numbers don’t show dramatic increases and see how satisfied you are in December 2009 (one year after the original survey).

Of course, that is assuming those brands are doing it right online in the first place.

Am I wrong? Should marketing executives expect faster turnarounds and returns on their digital investments? How and why? And how slow is too slow for marketing managers you know? The comments are yours.

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  • huangqin
  • engage conversation RT @TDefren If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Fault, via @jasonfalls. http://tinyurl.com/d6ktaf

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Fault, via @jasonfalls. http://tinyurl.com/d6ktaf

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Telling the truth builds trust. Certainly in our business ( providing psychology services) trust is integral to a successful outcome! Great post Beth… I love the House analogy.

    Kathy’s last blog post..Teens who chew gum get better grades

    This comment was originally posted on The Harte of Marketing

  • The reason, I think that we don’t tend to tell the truth in business situations is that we aren’t rewarded for doing so. In “House,” the secret leads to the “cure”. I’d like to think IRL if was that simple, but I’m not so sure. I’ve seen meetings where someone was singled out by upper management who said, “So and so made a mistake, but how great it was that they fixed it and let’s all learn from this.” But I have to tell you, it always feels condescending and awkward, and I never feel as that person is going to get a raise or a promotion * because * of that mistake.

    That said, I am still a big advocate of truth-telling. I’m just fascinated to see the implications of the proliferation of public conversations, and along with it the growing realization you will always be “found out”. Will be interesting to see if this will create a new level of tolerance for mistakes, forgiveness, openness and truth-telling, and how that will affect business and interactions in general.

    Lisa Hickey’s last blog post..Brand Predictions in Advertising & Marketing Technologies for Our Lives

    This comment was originally posted on The Harte of Marketing

  • I have long been a huge fan of telling it like it is and sharing the long line of failed attempts at doing things the “accepted way” with spewing every new “must have” product promotion at my pidddly little “list” that gets the same crap form everyone.

    It didn’t always help me gain any popularity contests and I’ve made quite a few enemies while simply trying to understand what so-called experts were telling me was effective while they did something else.

    Well, it all paid off.

    Social media is too revealing so get used to coming as you are and not trying to put on a front. There’s much to be learned when people get together and share individual pieces to a puzzle and create a big picture that works.

    @Web20Empire

    Sheree Motiska’s last blog post..The Only Must Have Social Media Element, A Blog.

    This comment was originally posted on The Harte of Marketing

  • Love the analogy. How true it is? We have a saying that refers to situations where our clients and prospects only tell us parts of the story, “Garbage in, garbage out”

    Stan Phelps’s last blog post..‘System Failure’ . . . Is Advertising Dead?

    This comment was originally posted on The Harte of Marketing

  • Beth,

    Great post. I think the analogy of wading through symptoms to find the source of the issue is a good one. It is my experience that open and honest communication only leads to better relationships in social media, marketing, and in personal relationships, as well.

    Being honest can only benefit everyone involved.

    SaraKate’s last blog post..006. The Question of Attention: To Multitask or Not To Multitask

    This comment was originally posted on The Harte of Marketing

  • Carl

    Yea, you know, social media. Whatever. You do what you like to do I do what I like to do. I'm gonna go play the commodore 64. Mine still works.

  • Carl

    Yea, you know, social media. Whatever. You do what you like to do I do what I like to do. I'm gonna go play the commodore 64. Mine still works.

  • Carl

    Yea, you know, social media. Whatever. You do what you like to do I do what I like to do. I'm gonna go play the commodore 64. Mine still works.

  • Carl

    Yea, you know, social media. Whatever. You do what you like to do I do what I like to do. I'm gonna go play the commodore 64. Mine still works.

  • Carl

    Yea, you know, social media. Whatever. You do what you like to do I do what I like to do. I'm gonna go play the commodore 64. Mine still works.

  • Carl

    Yea, you know, social media. Whatever. You do what you like to do I do what I like to do. I'm gonna go play the commodore 64. Mine still works.

  • Carl

    Wasting time. Wasting time. This site kinda sucks but here I am, wasting time.

    Carl, from Aqua Teen Hunger Force

  • Carl

    Wasting time. Wasting time. This site kinda sucks but here I am, wasting time.

    Carl, from Aqua Teen Hunger Force

  • Carl

    Wasting time. Wasting time. This site kinda sucks but here I am, wasting time.

    Carl, from Aqua Teen Hunger Force

  • Carl

    Wasting time. Wasting time. This site kinda sucks but here I am, wasting time.

    Carl, from Aqua Teen Hunger Force

  • Carl

    Wasting time. Wasting time. This site kinda sucks but here I am, wasting time.

    Carl, from Aqua Teen Hunger Force

  • Carl

    Wasting time. Wasting time. This site kinda sucks but here I am, wasting time.

    Carl, from Aqua Teen Hunger Force

  • Bulls-eye Beth. Talk + Trust = Transaction.

    If trust is jeopardized by un-truths, or outright deception (or what is commonly called in black hat agencies the “they didn’t ask, so we didn’t tell” policy), the want ads are in their immediate future. These are called scammers, not true consultants. True consultants are like attorneys, full disclosure to the client, always looking out for their best interest by being totally honest with them and giving them all their options.

    @TimMoore

    This comment was originally posted on The Harte of Marketing

  • I think your point is spot-on here, Beth, as are the above comments. I think that’s one of my worst nightmares as a PR practitioner – spending time and effort on something designed to benefit my client, and having it fail because I’m operating on incomplete/incorrect information.

    If a company can’t admit that problems exist, how can they ever hope to find solutions?

    @Lex_D

    Alexis’s last blog post..The Changing Front Page

    This comment was originally posted on The Harte of Marketing

  • Great post, Beth! As a PR consultant, I see the same thing. Years ago I was hired on by a client that wasn’t honest with me about what the company’s REAL challenges were.

    After spending quite a bit of time researching and hearing responses from media and customers, I had to create a new plan of action. Would have bee much easier [and less expensive] or the client if I’d known it in the beginning.

    When I reported my findings, the response was, “yeah, we know, but those people don’t know what they’re talking about.” Aaiiii.

    This comment was originally posted on The Harte of Marketing

  • If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Faultposted by Jason Falls in April 21st, 2009

    http://tinyurl.com/d6ktaf

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Beth,

    I was excited to see this post, I also have to admit that I am a House M.D. fanatic. You draw some great parallels here. One thing I would like to add is that I think, as marketers, especially when we are brought in as an agency/consultant, we overlook the fact that our client already has the answer (even if they don’t know it yet). Granted that honesty and openness is key in any partnership, I think the best agencies/consultants are the ones that can ask the questions that invoke thought. Even further, if we are truly good at what we do, we have an ability to listen like no other. Listening, I believe it is the real secret. Listening means taking a step back, holding back when we feel it is the ultimate time to jump in an advise them and giving them a real opportunity to lay it all out.

    I think as marketers, we will be surprised how much our client is willing to share. The best part about all of this – you can’t put a dollar value on empowering your client to think for themselves. I am sure they will agree.

    Thanks for a great post!

    Nicole Hamilton’s last blog post..There’s No Such Thing as Private Practice

    This comment was originally posted on The Harte of Marketing

  • The one big thing about secrets in communications (pretty much life, too) is that they eventually get uncovered. We saw this with situations like Enron and the Madoff scandal. These folks got found out.

    NOW I’M NOT SAYING that if they had worked with a good communications professional, these crises would have been avoided. However, I do believe that if all of their cards were on the table, the right kind of communications professional/team would have
    * advised them accordingly to help them see the light before they got too out of control;
    * attempted to help steer them in the ‘right’ direction;
    * help them understand the REAL CRISIS and DILEMMA that their actions would have surely brought on; OR
    * walked out of the relationship.

    Any way you slice it, the game of ‘communications’ has changed with the growing usage of social media…and for the better, I think. Businesses are so much more available and/or vulnerable to the customer – how truthful, ethical and customer-service oriented you are will determine how your audience(s) will hear you out when things go bad.

    Great post, Beth. Any other time you want to use HOUSE as a reference, ROCK ON with it!

    Narciso Tovar, Big Noise Communications’s last blog post..If 6 Was 9: Channeling Jimi Hendrix in Social Media

    This comment was originally posted on The Harte of Marketing

  • Jake, I think you have created a new concept for agencies. Who would visit the confessional booth most often, clients, AE’s or creative directors?

    Jay Ehret’s last blog post..Hit the Ground Running: Jason Jennings’ Rules for New Entrepreneurs

    This comment was originally posted on The Harte of Marketing

  • The truth shall set you free, indeed.

    Thanks for raising these points, Beth. There is a certain game that is being played in any business situation that filters productivity and effectiveness.

    As an agency/consultant type it is always interesting to try to guess the secret that isn’t being discussed when you are interviewing with a new client (or even working with a new product team). There is a delicate dance that both parties are performing and until the relationship is deep and trusting, it takes some coaxing to bring it out. Marketers are proud and even the most capable professional is hesitant to admit to past problems. It’s human nature.

    I’ve wondered recently whether or not an agency should set up a confession booth in the conference room with the promise to absolve sins so everyone can start with a clean slate. (Perhaps the agency team could trade places with the marketers for a 360-degree absolution).

    However, Jay is right. Social media has become the confessional. The great equalizer. And if a marketer’s communication partner is surprised by the truth, it puts everyone on shaky ground.

    P.S. I’m sorry I’m not going to be in town for your PRSA presentation May 13th. I really wanted an opportunity to meet offline. I’ll be sure my colleagues say hello.

    Jake Yarbrough (jakeybro)’s last blog post..Slo-Mo Jello: Breathtaking

    This comment was originally posted on The Harte of Marketing

  • Nicely put. Two things: (1) I would argue allegiance to truth is applicable to not just only social media but to every facet of marketing and also to building and maintaining an efficient and optimized business. And (2) To paraphrase Jack Nicholson, sometimes companies and their employees can’t handle the truth because they’re not honest and self-aware with themselves, their departments, or their companies. Without this self-awareness, these secrets either aren’t admitted or even known.

    Gerard Babitts’s last blog post..KEEP THE TWEETS PURE

    This comment was originally posted on The Harte of Marketing

  • Love the House metaphor, Beth. You’re spot on about truth in social media, because social media is about engagement.

    In the olden days of marketing, traditional advertising was about presenting the best possible truth. That meant keeping secrets and hiding things. That’s a model that’s not sustainable in social media. If you engage people long enough they will discover your truth. Eventually there are no secrets.

    Jay Ehret’s last blog post..Hit the Ground Running: Jason Jennings’ Rules for New Entrepreneurs

    This comment was originally posted on The Harte of Marketing

  • If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Fault http://tinyurl.com/d6ktaf

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Pingback: The social network conversations are getting louder « BuildIntel()

  • If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Fault http://bit.ly/Gr4ol #feedly

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  • Mark Van Baale

    Jason, I definitely agree with your thoughts on how easy it is for CMO's or anyone for that matter in advertising or marketing to easily dismiss social media if they don't see immediate results. I am a marketer myself and I work on direct mail campaigns, but what is interesting and odd about me is that I would much rather connect and interact with customers through ongoing relationships and then if they are ready to hear about the products my company sells, then I would be willing to hear their needs and help them out. Unfortuately, most everyone else in my department feels we need to push one-way communications, but I am trying to encourage two-way interaction with our customers. It has been a tough battle, but I keep pressing on. Maybe someday, I will break through that wall. :)

  • Mark Van Baale

    Jason, I definitely agree with your thoughts on how easy it is for CMO's or anyone for that matter in advertising or marketing to easily dismiss social media if they don't see immediate results. I am a marketer myself and I work on direct mail campaigns, but what is interesting and odd about me is that I would much rather connect and interact with customers through ongoing relationships and then if they are ready to hear about the products my company sells, then I would be willing to hear their needs and help them out. Unfortuately, most everyone else in my department feels we need to push one-way communications, but I am trying to encourage two-way interaction with our customers. It has been a tough battle, but I keep pressing on. Maybe someday, I will break through that wall. :)

  • Mark Van Baale

    Jason, I definitely agree with your thoughts on how easy it is for CMO's or anyone for that matter in advertising or marketing to easily dismiss social media if they don't see immediate results. I am a marketer myself and I work on direct mail campaigns, but what is interesting and odd about me is that I would much rather connect and interact with customers through ongoing relationships and then if they are ready to hear about the products my company sells, then I would be willing to hear their needs and help them out. Unfortuately, most everyone else in my department feels we need to push one-way communications, but I am trying to encourage two-way interaction with our customers. It has been a tough battle, but I keep pressing on. Maybe someday, I will break through that wall. :)

  • Mark Van Baale

    Jason, I definitely agree with your thoughts on how easy it is for CMO's or anyone for that matter in advertising or marketing to easily dismiss social media if they don't see immediate results. I am a marketer myself and I work on direct mail campaigns, but what is interesting and odd about me is that I would much rather connect and interact with customers through ongoing relationships and then if they are ready to hear about the products my company sells, then I would be willing to hear their needs and help them out. Unfortuately, most everyone else in my department feels we need to push one-way communications, but I am trying to encourage two-way interaction with our customers. It has been a tough battle, but I keep pressing on. Maybe someday, I will break through that wall. :)

  • Mark Van Baale

    Jason, I definitely agree with your thoughts on how easy it is for CMO's or anyone for that matter in advertising or marketing to easily dismiss social media if they don't see immediate results. I am a marketer myself and I work on direct mail campaigns, but what is interesting and odd about me is that I would much rather connect and interact with customers through ongoing relationships and then if they are ready to hear about the products my company sells, then I would be willing to hear their needs and help them out. Unfortuately, most everyone else in my department feels we need to push one-way communications, but I am trying to encourage two-way interaction with our customers. It has been a tough battle, but I keep pressing on. Maybe someday, I will break through that wall. :)

  • Mark Van Baale

    Jason, I definitely agree with your thoughts on how easy it is for CMO's or anyone for that matter in advertising or marketing to easily dismiss social media if they don't see immediate results. I am a marketer myself and I work on direct mail campaigns, but what is interesting and odd about me is that I would much rather connect and interact with customers through ongoing relationships and then if they are ready to hear about the products my company sells, then I would be willing to hear their needs and help them out. Unfortuately, most everyone else in my department feels we need to push one-way communications, but I am trying to encourage two-way interaction with our customers. It has been a tough battle, but I keep pressing on. Maybe someday, I will break through that wall. :)

  • I hear what you're saying, but the fact still exists that while you can measure the numbers quickly in the digital space, the point here is that you can't move them overnight. It takes a long term commitment to engaging your customers to make 1,000 visitors 10,000. But you're right. The metrics are holding us to a higher standard and making management nervous. Media metrics have probably been as brutal all these years. There just weren't effective ways to measure them like digital provides.

    Thanks for chiming in, RW.

  • I hear what you're saying, but the fact still exists that while you can measure the numbers quickly in the digital space, the point here is that you can't move them overnight. It takes a long term commitment to engaging your customers to make 1,000 visitors 10,000. But you're right. The metrics are holding us to a higher standard and making management nervous. Media metrics have probably been as brutal all these years. There just weren't effective ways to measure them like digital provides.

    Thanks for chiming in, RW.

  • I hear what you're saying, but the fact still exists that while you can measure the numbers quickly in the digital space, the point here is that you can't move them overnight. It takes a long term commitment to engaging your customers to make 1,000 visitors 10,000. But you're right. The metrics are holding us to a higher standard and making management nervous. Media metrics have probably been as brutal all these years. There just weren't effective ways to measure them like digital provides.

    Thanks for chiming in, RW.

  • I hear what you're saying, but the fact still exists that while you can measure the numbers quickly in the digital space, the point here is that you can't move them overnight. It takes a long term commitment to engaging your customers to make 1,000 visitors 10,000. But you're right. The metrics are holding us to a higher standard and making management nervous. Media metrics have probably been as brutal all these years. There just weren't effective ways to measure them like digital provides.

    Thanks for chiming in, RW.

  • I hear what you're saying, but the fact still exists that while you can measure the numbers quickly in the digital space, the point here is that you can't move them overnight. It takes a long term commitment to engaging your customers to make 1,000 visitors 10,000. But you're right. The metrics are holding us to a higher standard and making management nervous. Media metrics have probably been as brutal all these years. There just weren't effective ways to measure them like digital provides.

    Thanks for chiming in, RW.

  • Thanks Chris. Unfortunately, when a choir is in the room, I normally keep my mouth shut. Afraid of lightning. Heh.

    Thanks for saying so, though.

  • Thanks Chris. Unfortunately, when a choir is in the room, I normally keep my mouth shut. Afraid of lightning. Heh.

    Thanks for saying so, though.

  • Thanks Chris. Unfortunately, when a choir is in the room, I normally keep my mouth shut. Afraid of lightning. Heh.

    Thanks for saying so, though.

  • Thanks Chris. Unfortunately, when a choir is in the room, I normally keep my mouth shut. Afraid of lightning. Heh.

    Thanks for saying so, though.

  • Thanks Chris. Unfortunately, when a choir is in the room, I normally keep my mouth shut. Afraid of lightning. Heh.

    Thanks for saying so, though.

  • Yep. Tis true.

    Thanks Barbara.

  • Yep. Tis true.

    Thanks Barbara.

  • Yep. Tis true.

    Thanks Barbara.

  • Yep. Tis true.

    Thanks Barbara.

  • Yep. Tis true.

    Thanks Barbara.

  • Great points Gerard. I agree that the digital space now is not a campaign-oriented effort. It's a relationship with your consumers. And you don't build relationships in a quarter.

    Great points. Thanks for chiming in.

  • Great points Gerard. I agree that the digital space now is not a campaign-oriented effort. It's a relationship with your consumers. And you don't build relationships in a quarter.

    Great points. Thanks for chiming in.

  • Great points Gerard. I agree that the digital space now is not a campaign-oriented effort. It's a relationship with your consumers. And you don't build relationships in a quarter.

    Great points. Thanks for chiming in.

  • Great points Gerard. I agree that the digital space now is not a campaign-oriented effort. It's a relationship with your consumers. And you don't build relationships in a quarter.

    Great points. Thanks for chiming in.

  • Great points Gerard. I agree that the digital space now is not a campaign-oriented effort. It's a relationship with your consumers. And you don't build relationships in a quarter.

    Great points. Thanks for chiming in.

  • If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Fault http://bit.ly/iJsZB

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Good @JasonFalls post & comments: If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Fault http://bit.ly/uWm9v

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  • If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Fault | Social … http://bit.ly/b26NO

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  • If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Fault http://tinyurl.com/d6ktaf from: @JasonFalls

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  • Good digital marketing takes a time investment to see desired results. Check out this post on the topic by @JasonFalls. http://bit.ly/iJsZB

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  • Get with the (digital) programme CMOs by @JasonFalls http://tinyurl.com/d6ktaf

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  • Digital is much more about truely measurable ( instant) accountability and there is the crux of the problem. Digital is revealing about managment and demands more management. Its no wonder most managers are not pleased as maost have gone their entire careers without a light being shined on their efforts.

    Welcome to the real world.

  • Digital is much more about truely measurable ( instant) accountability and there is the crux of the problem. Digital is revealing about managment and demands more management. Its no wonder most managers are not pleased as maost have gone their entire careers without a light being shined on their efforts.

    Welcome to the real world.

  • Digital is much more about truely measurable ( instant) accountability and there is the crux of the problem. Digital is revealing about managment and demands more management. Its no wonder most managers are not pleased as maost have gone their entire careers without a light being shined on their efforts.

    Welcome to the real world.

  • Digital is much more about truely measurable ( instant) accountability and there is the crux of the problem. Digital is revealing about managment and demands more management. Its no wonder most managers are not pleased as maost have gone their entire careers without a light being shined on their efforts.

    Welcome to the real world.

  • Digital is much more about truely measurable ( instant) accountability and there is the crux of the problem. Digital is revealing about managment and demands more management. Its no wonder most managers are not pleased as maost have gone their entire careers without a light being shined on their efforts.

    Welcome to the real world.

  • Digital is much more about truely measurable ( instant) accountability and there is the crux of the problem. Digital is revealing about managment and demands more management. Its no wonder most managers are not pleased as maost have gone their entire careers without a light being shined on their efforts.

    Welcome to the real world.

    • I hear what you're saying, but the fact still exists that while you can measure the numbers quickly in the digital space, the point here is that you can't move them overnight. It takes a long term commitment to engaging your customers to make 1,000 visitors 10,000. But you're right. The metrics are holding us to a higher standard and making management nervous. Media metrics have probably been as brutal all these years. There just weren't effective ways to measure them like digital provides.

      Thanks for chiming in, RW.

  • Hey Jason – I loved this post. I read it twice and think you should have a gospel choir singing along behind you while you read it aloud. Thanks for the passion.

  • Hey Jason – I loved this post. I read it twice and think you should have a gospel choir singing along behind you while you read it aloud. Thanks for the passion.

  • Hey Jason – I loved this post. I read it twice and think you should have a gospel choir singing along behind you while you read it aloud. Thanks for the passion.

  • Hey Jason – I loved this post. I read it twice and think you should have a gospel choir singing along behind you while you read it aloud. Thanks for the passion.

  • Hey Jason – I loved this post. I read it twice and think you should have a gospel choir singing along behind you while you read it aloud. Thanks for the passion.

  • Hey Jason – I loved this post. I read it twice and think you should have a gospel choir singing along behind you while you read it aloud. Thanks for the passion.

    • Thanks Chris. Unfortunately, when a choir is in the room, I normally keep my mouth shut. Afraid of lightning. Heh.

      Thanks for saying so, though.

  • If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Fault | Social … http://bit.ly/ngyBW

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  • from @JasonFalls If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Fault http://bit.ly/Gr4ol

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  • Reading “If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Fault” from @JasonFalls. http://snurl.com/gdfmo

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  • Nice on from @jasonfalls If CMOs Are Unhappy With Digital, It’s Their Own Fault http://tinyurl.com/d6ktaf

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  • @JasonFalls another excellent post, sir. http://tinyurl.com/d6ktaf

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  • Management wants everything yesterday?

    The more things change, the more they remain the same….. :/

  • Management wants everything yesterday?

    The more things change, the more they remain the same….. :/

  • Management wants everything yesterday?

    The more things change, the more they remain the same….. :/

  • Management wants everything yesterday?

    The more things change, the more they remain the same….. :/

  • Management wants everything yesterday?

    The more things change, the more they remain the same….. :/

  • Management wants everything yesterday?

    The more things change, the more they remain the same….. :/

  • Spot on. Much of this impatience is also a result of CMO's excessive focus on an elusive social media ROI and a lack of faith. Either you believe in the power of talking and engaging with your consumers or you don't. It is more about experience, intuition, and faith than it is about metrics, research, and quantitative metrics.

    Paraphrasing something I heard recently, digital (and social media) is not a campaign it is a commitment. So while CMOs and large companies dither over digital campaigns or how digital ROI isn't as strong as their traditional and tried advertising and marketing strategies and tactics, companies who “believe” (like Zappos and Comcast) get the upper hand.

  • Spot on. Much of this impatience is also a result of CMO's excessive focus on an elusive social media ROI and a lack of faith. Either you believe in the power of talking and engaging with your consumers or you don't. It is more about experience, intuition, and faith than it is about metrics, research, and quantitative metrics.

    Paraphrasing something I heard recently, digital (and social media) is not a campaign it is a commitment. So while CMOs and large companies dither over digital campaigns or how digital ROI isn't as strong as their traditional and tried advertising and marketing strategies and tactics, companies who “believe” (like Zappos and Comcast) get the upper hand.

  • Spot on. Much of this impatience is also a result of CMO's excessive focus on an elusive social media ROI and a lack of faith. Either you believe in the power of talking and engaging with your consumers or you don't. It is more about experience, intuition, and faith than it is about metrics, research, and quantitative metrics.

    Paraphrasing something I heard recently, digital (and social media) is not a campaign it is a commitment. So while CMOs and large companies dither over digital campaigns or how digital ROI isn't as strong as their traditional and tried advertising and marketing strategies and tactics, companies who “believe” (like Zappos and Comcast) get the upper hand.

  • Spot on. Much of this impatience is also a result of CMO's excessive focus on an elusive social media ROI and a lack of faith. Either you believe in the power of talking and engaging with your consumers or you don't. It is more about experience, intuition, and faith than it is about metrics, research, and quantitative metrics.

    Paraphrasing something I heard recently, digital (and social media) is not a campaign it is a commitment. So while CMOs and large companies dither over digital campaigns or how digital ROI isn't as strong as their traditional and tried advertising and marketing strategies and tactics, companies who “believe” (like Zappos and Comcast) get the upper hand.

  • Spot on. Much of this impatience is also a result of CMO's excessive focus on an elusive social media ROI and a lack of faith. Either you believe in the power of talking and engaging with your consumers or you don't. It is more about experience, intuition, and faith than it is about metrics, research, and quantitative metrics.

    Paraphrasing something I heard recently, digital (and social media) is not a campaign it is a commitment. So while CMOs and large companies dither over digital campaigns or how digital ROI isn't as strong as their traditional and tried advertising and marketing strategies and tactics, companies who “believe” (like Zappos and Comcast) get the upper hand.

  • Spot on. Much of this impatience is also a result of CMO's excessive focus on an elusive social media ROI and a lack of faith. Either you believe in the power of talking and engaging with your consumers or you don't. It is more about experience, intuition, and faith than it is about metrics, research, and quantitative metrics.

    Paraphrasing something I heard recently, digital (and social media) is not a campaign it is a commitment. So while CMOs and large companies dither over digital campaigns or how digital ROI isn't as strong as their traditional and tried advertising and marketing strategies and tactics, companies who “believe” (like Zappos and Comcast) get the upper hand.

    • Great points Gerard. I agree that the digital space now is not a campaign-oriented effort. It's a relationship with your consumers. And you don't build relationships in a quarter.

      Great points. Thanks for chiming in.

  • Bravo James. Excellent points and wonderful addition to the conversation. Thank you for that. I'll be interested to see what the other commentors say as well. Much appreciated.

  • Bravo James. Excellent points and wonderful addition to the conversation. Thank you for that. I'll be interested to see what the other commentors say as well. Much appreciated.

  • Bravo James. Excellent points and wonderful addition to the conversation. Thank you for that. I'll be interested to see what the other commentors say as well. Much appreciated.

  • Bravo James. Excellent points and wonderful addition to the conversation. Thank you for that. I'll be interested to see what the other commentors say as well. Much appreciated.

  • Bravo James. Excellent points and wonderful addition to the conversation. Thank you for that. I'll be interested to see what the other commentors say as well. Much appreciated.

  • Jason,

    You have a point but CMO impatience is not unique to digital. The same characteristics can be seen in customer communication programs using direct mail. The results curve looks like a hockey stick; not much change for a period of time and then wham, positive results start to compound and up shoots the curve. In my experience these programs often fall victim to CMO impatience before they have had time to be successful. When they can run their course I've seen 20% ROI and better, but it takes time.

    The other issue that CMOs must deal with is metrics that are out of sync with objectives. They launch a campaign designed to create demand (awareness and intent to purchase) using digital channels (display, social media) and then use demand fulfillment metrics (CTR, CPC, CPL) to assess the effort. When the results don't compare favorably to Search, a demand fulfillment channel, the effort is judged a failure.

    James

  • Jason,

    You have a point but CMO impatience is not unique to digital. The same characteristics can be seen in customer communication programs using direct mail. The results curve looks like a hockey stick; not much change for a period of time and then wham, positive results start to compound and up shoots the curve. In my experience these programs often fall victim to CMO impatience before they have had time to be successful. When they can run their course I've seen 20% ROI and better, but it takes time.

    The other issue that CMOs must deal with is metrics that are out of sync with objectives. They launch a campaign designed to create demand (awareness and intent to purchase) using digital channels (display, social media) and then use demand fulfillment metrics (CTR, CPC, CPL) to assess the effort. When the results don't compare favorably to Search, a demand fulfillment channel, the effort is judged a failure.

    James

  • Jason,

    You have a point but CMO impatience is not unique to digital. The same characteristics can be seen in customer communication programs using direct mail. The results curve looks like a hockey stick; not much change for a period of time and then wham, positive results start to compound and up shoots the curve. In my experience these programs often fall victim to CMO impatience before they have had time to be successful. When they can run their course I've seen 20% ROI and better, but it takes time.

    The other issue that CMOs must deal with is metrics that are out of sync with objectives. They launch a campaign designed to create demand (awareness and intent to purchase) using digital channels (display, social media) and then use demand fulfillment metrics (CTR, CPC, CPL) to assess the effort. When the results don't compare favorably to Search, a demand fulfillment channel, the effort is judged a failure.

    James

  • Jason,

    You have a point but CMO impatience is not unique to digital. The same characteristics can be seen in customer communication programs using direct mail. The results curve looks like a hockey stick; not much change for a period of time and then wham, positive results start to compound and up shoots the curve. In my experience these programs often fall victim to CMO impatience before they have had time to be successful. When they can run their course I've seen 20% ROI and better, but it takes time.

    The other issue that CMOs must deal with is metrics that are out of sync with objectives. They launch a campaign designed to create demand (awareness and intent to purchase) using digital channels (display, social media) and then use demand fulfillment metrics (CTR, CPC, CPL) to assess the effort. When the results don't compare favorably to Search, a demand fulfillment channel, the effort is judged a failure.

    James

  • Jason,

    You have a point but CMO impatience is not unique to digital. The same characteristics can be seen in customer communication programs using direct mail. The results curve looks like a hockey stick; not much change for a period of time and then wham, positive results start to compound and up shoots the curve. In my experience these programs often fall victim to CMO impatience before they have had time to be successful. When they can run their course I've seen 20% ROI and better, but it takes time.

    The other issue that CMOs must deal with is metrics that are out of sync with objectives. They launch a campaign designed to create demand (awareness and intent to purchase) using digital channels (display, social media) and then use demand fulfillment metrics (CTR, CPC, CPL) to assess the effort. When the results don't compare favorably to Search, a demand fulfillment channel, the effort is judged a failure.

    James

  • Jason,

    You have a point but CMO impatience is not unique to digital. The same characteristics can be seen in customer communication programs using direct mail. The results curve looks like a hockey stick; not much change for a period of time and then wham, positive results start to compound and up shoots the curve. In my experience these programs often fall victim to CMO impatience before they have had time to be successful. When they can run their course I've seen 20% ROI and better, but it takes time.

    The other issue that CMOs must deal with is metrics that are out of sync with objectives. They launch a campaign designed to create demand (awareness and intent to purchase) using digital channels (display, social media) and then use demand fulfillment metrics (CTR, CPC, CPL) to assess the effort. When the results don't compare favorably to Search, a demand fulfillment channel, the effort is judged a failure.

    James

    • Bravo James. Excellent points and wonderful addition to the conversation. Thank you for that. I'll be interested to see what the other commentors say as well. Much appreciated.