Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good?
Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good?
by
Jason Falls
Jason Falls

There’s an interesting article in the April 27 issue of Time Magazine about how the current worldwide economic woes are effecting Americans. The report, which is a combination of essays and survey statistics of U.S. spending habits and attitudes toward the economy, is not, however, just a, “woe is us,” statement of how the recession is causing a collective tightening of our purse strings. The piece seems to indicate the recession may just change the way we spend for years to come — a cultural shift if you will — that will prevail beyond the current world money problems.

Should this be the case, and I think it might be, then marketers had better take note.

Take into consideration the following citations from the report:

  • “Talk to people not just about how they feel about how they’re living now, and you hear more resolve than regret.”
  • “Even when prosperity returns, 61 percent predict, they’ll continue to spend less than they did before.”

And from the introductory prose’s conclusion:

  • “So we pass the time by ending our gardens and patching our safety nets and debating whether, years from now, this season will be remembered for what we last, or all that we found.”
day in the life: lunch money
Image by emdot via Flickr

What this piece, and a lot of the accompanying statistics, might indicate is that our society is waking up from the self-indulgent bender of the last 50 years and shifting to a more sensible way of living. What that might mean to marketers is that premium is no longer chic. To put it more bluntly, why buy Nike when Wilson will do? Spending that much on a Volvo seems too indulgent. How about we just get a Honda Civic? An $80 bottle of wine? Nah. Beringer White Zinfandel will work fine.

This potential trend certainly hits pretty close to home for those of us in Kentucky working around the spirits business, which has seen declines in many premium categories, though several are up. For the better part of the last 20 years or so, spirits brands have trumped one another with premium brands. They’ve done it so much that, if you can believe it, there are premium spirits, super premium spirits and even ultra premium spirits. And it’s not just my home category of bourbon, but other whiskeys, vodkas, gins, rums and more.

Premium brands extend beyond the spirits category, though. There are premium dog foods, coffees, cleaning supplies, bathroom tissues, soups, soaps, clothing, cars and furniture. You pay a little more, you get a better product or experience (allegedly).

Most categories of anything are taking a hit right now thanks to the economy, so it’s hard to tell if the intimations in the Time article are indicative of a trend to be. BMW and Mercedes are both reporting double-digit losses over the same months last year. The Time piece shows 56 percent of Americans are dining out less at non-fast-food restaurants (also consider an upgrade or premium). More people are shopping at discount stores, using coupons and buying in bulk than in previous years.

All of that is expected with our country’s financial woes the way they are. But will this time of economic uncertainty mean we will re-learn what it means to spend? If so, what does this mean for brands that are consider a “step-up” experience? And, selfishly, what does it mean for their marketers?

Please answer those questions and share your thoughts in the comments. Let us now begin to decipher if our overall spending habits are changing and if so, how. And how will brands effected by that change adjust to survive and thrive in what could be a new world order?

What say you? The comments are yours.

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About the Author

Jason Falls
Jason Falls is the founder of Social Media Explorer and one of the most notable and outspoken voices in the social media marketing industry. He is a noted marketing keynote speaker, author of two books and unapologetic bourbon aficionado. He can also be found at JasonFalls.com.
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  • I think we have to go back to basics. One step at a time. Recession is really scary. What I am doing right now is saving every penny, spend every dime to basic necessities, exert effort to save time, energy.Be practical.

  • I think we have to go back to basics. One step at a time. Recession is really scary. What I am doing right now is saving every penny, spend every dime to basic necessities, exert effort to save time, energy.Be practical.

  • I think we have to go back to basics. One step at a time. Recession is really scary. What I am doing right now is saving every penny, spend every dime to basic necessities, exert effort to save time, energy.Be practical.

  • I think we have to go back to basics. One step at a time. Recession is really scary. What I am doing right now is saving every penny, spend every dime to basic necessities, exert effort to save time, energy.Be practical.

  • I think we have to go back to basics. One step at a time. Recession is really scary. What I am doing right now is saving every penny, spend every dime to basic necessities, exert effort to save time, energy.Be practical.

  • I think we have to go back to basics. One step at a time. Recession is really scary. What I am doing right now is saving every penny, spend every dime to basic necessities, exert effort to save time, energy.Be practical.

  • You're right, Atul. Changes only truly happen when a long form economic shift settles in. However, the Time magazine article seemed to indicate that Americans may be learning their lessons from overconsumption in the past. I wonder if that's true or if we need a longer term of economic down turn to determine that. Thanks for the non-U.S. perspective, though. We certainly need it more than we get it over here.

  • You're right, Atul. Changes only truly happen when a long form economic shift settles in. However, the Time magazine article seemed to indicate that Americans may be learning their lessons from overconsumption in the past. I wonder if that's true or if we need a longer term of economic down turn to determine that. Thanks for the non-U.S. perspective, though. We certainly need it more than we get it over here.

  • You're right, Atul. Changes only truly happen when a long form economic shift settles in. However, the Time magazine article seemed to indicate that Americans may be learning their lessons from overconsumption in the past. I wonder if that's true or if we need a longer term of economic down turn to determine that. Thanks for the non-U.S. perspective, though. We certainly need it more than we get it over here.

  • You're right, Atul. Changes only truly happen when a long form economic shift settles in. However, the Time magazine article seemed to indicate that Americans may be learning their lessons from overconsumption in the past. I wonder if that's true or if we need a longer term of economic down turn to determine that. Thanks for the non-U.S. perspective, though. We certainly need it more than we get it over here.

  • You're right, Atul. Changes only truly happen when a long form economic shift settles in. However, the Time magazine article seemed to indicate that Americans may be learning their lessons from overconsumption in the past. I wonder if that's true or if we need a longer term of economic down turn to determine that. Thanks for the non-U.S. perspective, though. We certainly need it more than we get it over here.

  • You're right, Atul. Changes only truly happen when a long form economic shift settles in. However, the Time magazine article seemed to indicate that Americans may be learning their lessons from overconsumption in the past. I wonder if that's true or if we need a longer term of economic down turn to determine that. Thanks for the non-U.S. perspective, though. We certainly need it more than we get it over here.

  • You're right, Atul. Changes only truly happen when a long form economic shift settles in. However, the Time magazine article seemed to indicate that Americans may be learning their lessons from overconsumption in the past. I wonder if that's true or if we need a longer term of economic down turn to determine that. Thanks for the non-U.S. perspective, though. We certainly need it more than we get it over here.

  • You're right, Atul. Changes only truly happen when a long form economic shift settles in. However, the Time magazine article seemed to indicate that Americans may be learning their lessons from overconsumption in the past. I wonder if that's true or if we need a longer term of economic down turn to determine that. Thanks for the non-U.S. perspective, though. We certainly need it more than we get it over here.

  • You're right, Atul. Changes only truly happen when a long form economic shift settles in. However, the Time magazine article seemed to indicate that Americans may be learning their lessons from overconsumption in the past. I wonder if that's true or if we need a longer term of economic down turn to determine that. Thanks for the non-U.S. perspective, though. We certainly need it more than we get it over here.

  • You're right, Atul. Changes only truly happen when a long form economic shift settles in. However, the Time magazine article seemed to indicate that Americans may be learning their lessons from overconsumption in the past. I wonder if that's true or if we need a longer term of economic down turn to determine that. Thanks for the non-U.S. perspective, though. We certainly need it more than we get it over here.

  • Sitting in India it appears the woes of Americans are far away. But Jason what you have to realize is that the duration of the recession is a determining factor in changing spending habits. Another factor is the nature of the cut in income. Or has the person been unable to pay off a mortgage?
    This sort of gross analysis seems immature. One way of studying it is by examining past cases of some of the factors listed above. Then using the behavior of these small samples extrapolate a picture of the future.

  • Sitting in India it appears the woes of Americans are far away. But Jason what you have to realize is that the duration of the recession is a determining factor in changing spending habits. Another factor is the nature of the cut in income. Or has the person been unable to pay off a mortgage?
    This sort of gross analysis seems immature. One way of studying it is by examining past cases of some of the factors listed above. Then using the behavior of these small samples extrapolate a picture of the future.

  • Sitting in India it appears the woes of Americans are far away. But Jason what you have to realize is that the duration of the recession is a determining factor in changing spending habits. Another factor is the nature of the cut in income. Or has the person been unable to pay off a mortgage?
    This sort of gross analysis seems immature. One way of studying it is by examining past cases of some of the factors listed above. Then using the behavior of these small samples extrapolate a picture of the future.

  • Sitting in India it appears the woes of Americans are far away. But Jason what you have to realize is that the duration of the recession is a determining factor in changing spending habits. Another factor is the nature of the cut in income. Or has the person been unable to pay off a mortgage?
    This sort of gross analysis seems immature. One way of studying it is by examining past cases of some of the factors listed above. Then using the behavior of these small samples extrapolate a picture of the future.

  • Sitting in India it appears the woes of Americans are far away. But Jason what you have to realize is that the duration of the recession is a determining factor in changing spending habits. Another factor is the nature of the cut in income. Or has the person been unable to pay off a mortgage?
    This sort of gross analysis seems immature. One way of studying it is by examining past cases of some of the factors listed above. Then using the behavior of these small samples extrapolate a picture of the future.

  • Sitting in India it appears the woes of Americans are far away. But Jason what you have to realize is that the duration of the recession is a determining factor in changing spending habits. Another factor is the nature of the cut in income. Or has the person been unable to pay off a mortgage?
    This sort of gross analysis seems immature. One way of studying it is by examining past cases of some of the factors listed above. Then using the behavior of these small samples extrapolate a picture of the future.

  • Sitting in India it appears the woes of Americans are far away. But Jason what you have to realize is that the duration of the recession is a determining factor in changing spending habits. Another factor is the nature of the cut in income. Or has the person been unable to pay off a mortgage?
    This sort of gross analysis seems immature. One way of studying it is by examining past cases of some of the factors listed above. Then using the behavior of these small samples extrapolate a picture of the future.

  • Sitting in India it appears the woes of Americans are far away. But Jason what you have to realize is that the duration of the recession is a determining factor in changing spending habits. Another factor is the nature of the cut in income. Or has the person been unable to pay off a mortgage?
    This sort of gross analysis seems immature. One way of studying it is by examining past cases of some of the factors listed above. Then using the behavior of these small samples extrapolate a picture of the future.

  • Sitting in India it appears the woes of Americans are far away. But Jason what you have to realize is that the duration of the recession is a determining factor in changing spending habits. Another factor is the nature of the cut in income. Or has the person been unable to pay off a mortgage?
    This sort of gross analysis seems immature. One way of studying it is by examining past cases of some of the factors listed above. Then using the behavior of these small samples extrapolate a picture of the future.

  • Sitting in India it appears the woes of Americans are far away. But Jason what you have to realize is that the duration of the recession is a determining factor in changing spending habits. Another factor is the nature of the cut in income. Or has the person been unable to pay off a mortgage?
    This sort of gross analysis seems immature. One way of studying it is by examining past cases of some of the factors listed above. Then using the behavior of these small samples extrapolate a picture of the future.

  • Sitting in India it appears the woes of Americans are far away. But Jason what you have to realize is that the duration of the recession is a determining factor in changing spending habits. Another factor is the nature of the cut in income. Or has the person been unable to pay off a mortgage?
    This sort of gross analysis seems immature. One way of studying it is by examining past cases of some of the factors listed above. Then using the behavior of these small samples extrapolate a picture of the future.

    • You're right, Atul. Changes only truly happen when a long form economic shift settles in. However, the Time magazine article seemed to indicate that Americans may be learning their lessons from overconsumption in the past. I wonder if that's true or if we need a longer term of economic down turn to determine that. Thanks for the non-U.S. perspective, though. We certainly need it more than we get it over here.

  • Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? http://tinyurl.com/czgw2r

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  • RT @JeffHurt: Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? by @jasonfalls http://ow.ly/4slh

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? by @jasonfalls http://ow.ly/4slh

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • I tend to agree with you Brett, but still think the notion Time's article purports might have some merit. We've run through a few decades of over-indulgence. Maybe this recession and understanding the world isn't always going to be fruitful and prosperous might teach us to rethink our spending and consumption. It's an interesting notion nonetheless. Thanks for the perspective.

  • I tend to agree with you Brett, but still think the notion Time's article purports might have some merit. We've run through a few decades of over-indulgence. Maybe this recession and understanding the world isn't always going to be fruitful and prosperous might teach us to rethink our spending and consumption. It's an interesting notion nonetheless. Thanks for the perspective.

  • I tend to agree with you Brett, but still think the notion Time's article purports might have some merit. We've run through a few decades of over-indulgence. Maybe this recession and understanding the world isn't always going to be fruitful and prosperous might teach us to rethink our spending and consumption. It's an interesting notion nonetheless. Thanks for the perspective.

  • I tend to agree with you Brett, but still think the notion Time's article purports might have some merit. We've run through a few decades of over-indulgence. Maybe this recession and understanding the world isn't always going to be fruitful and prosperous might teach us to rethink our spending and consumption. It's an interesting notion nonetheless. Thanks for the perspective.

  • I tend to agree with you Brett, but still think the notion Time's article purports might have some merit. We've run through a few decades of over-indulgence. Maybe this recession and understanding the world isn't always going to be fruitful and prosperous might teach us to rethink our spending and consumption. It's an interesting notion nonetheless. Thanks for the perspective.

  • I tend to agree with you Brett, but still think the notion Time's article purports might have some merit. We've run through a few decades of over-indulgence. Maybe this recession and understanding the world isn't always going to be fruitful and prosperous might teach us to rethink our spending and consumption. It's an interesting notion nonetheless. Thanks for the perspective.

  • I tend to agree with you Brett, but still think the notion Time's article purports might have some merit. We've run through a few decades of over-indulgence. Maybe this recession and understanding the world isn't always going to be fruitful and prosperous might teach us to rethink our spending and consumption. It's an interesting notion nonetheless. Thanks for the perspective.

  • I tend to agree with you Brett, but still think the notion Time's article purports might have some merit. We've run through a few decades of over-indulgence. Maybe this recession and understanding the world isn't always going to be fruitful and prosperous might teach us to rethink our spending and consumption. It's an interesting notion nonetheless. Thanks for the perspective.

  • I tend to agree with you Brett, but still think the notion Time's article purports might have some merit. We've run through a few decades of over-indulgence. Maybe this recession and understanding the world isn't always going to be fruitful and prosperous might teach us to rethink our spending and consumption. It's an interesting notion nonetheless. Thanks for the perspective.

  • I tend to agree with you Brett, but still think the notion Time's article purports might have some merit. We've run through a few decades of over-indulgence. Maybe this recession and understanding the world isn't always going to be fruitful and prosperous might teach us to rethink our spending and consumption. It's an interesting notion nonetheless. Thanks for the perspective.

  • I tend to agree with you Brett, but still think the notion Time's article purports might have some merit. We've run through a few decades of over-indulgence. Maybe this recession and understanding the world isn't always going to be fruitful and prosperous might teach us to rethink our spending and consumption. It's an interesting notion nonetheless. Thanks for the perspective.

  • I tend to agree with you Brett, but still think the notion Time's article purports might have some merit. We've run through a few decades of over-indulgence. Maybe this recession and understanding the world isn't always going to be fruitful and prosperous might teach us to rethink our spending and consumption. It's an interesting notion nonetheless. Thanks for the perspective.

  • Excellent points, Mr. Breed. Thank you for this. I'm right there with you, too. I'd love to see more of a discussion about how brands can live in-network with customers and build that affinity. For those who have made it this far in the comments, please … your thoughts?

  • Excellent points, Mr. Breed. Thank you for this. I'm right there with you, too. I'd love to see more of a discussion about how brands can live in-network with customers and build that affinity. For those who have made it this far in the comments, please … your thoughts?

  • Excellent points, Mr. Breed. Thank you for this. I'm right there with you, too. I'd love to see more of a discussion about how brands can live in-network with customers and build that affinity. For those who have made it this far in the comments, please … your thoughts?

  • Excellent points, Mr. Breed. Thank you for this. I'm right there with you, too. I'd love to see more of a discussion about how brands can live in-network with customers and build that affinity. For those who have made it this far in the comments, please … your thoughts?

  • Excellent points, Mr. Breed. Thank you for this. I'm right there with you, too. I'd love to see more of a discussion about how brands can live in-network with customers and build that affinity. For those who have made it this far in the comments, please … your thoughts?

  • Excellent points, Mr. Breed. Thank you for this. I'm right there with you, too. I'd love to see more of a discussion about how brands can live in-network with customers and build that affinity. For those who have made it this far in the comments, please … your thoughts?

  • Excellent points, Mr. Breed. Thank you for this. I'm right there with you, too. I'd love to see more of a discussion about how brands can live in-network with customers and build that affinity. For those who have made it this far in the comments, please … your thoughts?

  • Excellent points, Mr. Breed. Thank you for this. I'm right there with you, too. I'd love to see more of a discussion about how brands can live in-network with customers and build that affinity. For those who have made it this far in the comments, please … your thoughts?

  • Excellent points, Mr. Breed. Thank you for this. I'm right there with you, too. I'd love to see more of a discussion about how brands can live in-network with customers and build that affinity. For those who have made it this far in the comments, please … your thoughts?

  • Excellent points, Mr. Breed. Thank you for this. I'm right there with you, too. I'd love to see more of a discussion about how brands can live in-network with customers and build that affinity. For those who have made it this far in the comments, please … your thoughts?

  • Excellent points, Mr. Breed. Thank you for this. I'm right there with you, too. I'd love to see more of a discussion about how brands can live in-network with customers and build that affinity. For those who have made it this far in the comments, please … your thoughts?

  • Excellent points, Mr. Breed. Thank you for this. I'm right there with you, too. I'd love to see more of a discussion about how brands can live in-network with customers and build that affinity. For those who have made it this far in the comments, please … your thoughts?

  • I think the current economic climate is just part of an eternal cycle.. fueled by fear and greed… and that prosperity (and the luxury brands that go with it) will always come through. I don't think people will change their spending habits for the long term – it's more of a temporary thing that will bounce back when people's bank statements do.

  • I think the current economic climate is just part of an eternal cycle.. fueled by fear and greed… and that prosperity (and the luxury brands that go with it) will always come through. I don't think people will change their spending habits for the long term – it's more of a temporary thing that will bounce back when people's bank statements do.

  • I think the current economic climate is just part of an eternal cycle.. fueled by fear and greed… and that prosperity (and the luxury brands that go with it) will always come through. I don't think people will change their spending habits for the long term – it's more of a temporary thing that will bounce back when people's bank statements do.

  • I think the current economic climate is just part of an eternal cycle.. fueled by fear and greed… and that prosperity (and the luxury brands that go with it) will always come through. I don't think people will change their spending habits for the long term – it's more of a temporary thing that will bounce back when people's bank statements do.

  • I think the current economic climate is just part of an eternal cycle.. fueled by fear and greed… and that prosperity (and the luxury brands that go with it) will always come through. I don't think people will change their spending habits for the long term – it's more of a temporary thing that will bounce back when people's bank statements do.

  • I think the current economic climate is just part of an eternal cycle.. fueled by fear and greed… and that prosperity (and the luxury brands that go with it) will always come through. I don't think people will change their spending habits for the long term – it's more of a temporary thing that will bounce back when people's bank statements do.

  • I think the current economic climate is just part of an eternal cycle.. fueled by fear and greed… and that prosperity (and the luxury brands that go with it) will always come through. I don't think people will change their spending habits for the long term – it's more of a temporary thing that will bounce back when people's bank statements do.

  • I think the current economic climate is just part of an eternal cycle.. fueled by fear and greed… and that prosperity (and the luxury brands that go with it) will always come through. I don't think people will change their spending habits for the long term – it's more of a temporary thing that will bounce back when people's bank statements do.

  • I think the current economic climate is just part of an eternal cycle.. fueled by fear and greed… and that prosperity (and the luxury brands that go with it) will always come through. I don't think people will change their spending habits for the long term – it's more of a temporary thing that will bounce back when people's bank statements do.

  • I think the current economic climate is just part of an eternal cycle.. fueled by fear and greed… and that prosperity (and the luxury brands that go with it) will always come through. I don't think people will change their spending habits for the long term – it's more of a temporary thing that will bounce back when people's bank statements do.

  • I think the current economic climate is just part of an eternal cycle.. fueled by fear and greed… and that prosperity (and the luxury brands that go with it) will always come through. I don't think people will change their spending habits for the long term – it's more of a temporary thing that will bounce back when people's bank statements do.

  • I think the current economic climate is just part of an eternal cycle.. fueled by fear and greed… and that prosperity (and the luxury brands that go with it) will always come through. I don't think people will change their spending habits for the long term – it's more of a temporary thing that will bounce back when people's bank statements do.

  • I think the current economic climate is just part of an eternal cycle.. fueled by fear and greed… and that prosperity (and the luxury brands that go with it) will always come through. I don't think people will change their spending habits for the long term – it's more of a temporary thing that will bounce back when people's bank statements do.

    • I tend to agree with you Brett, but still think the notion Time's article purports might have some merit. We've run through a few decades of over-indulgence. Maybe this recession and understanding the world isn't always going to be fruitful and prosperous might teach us to rethink our spending and consumption. It's an interesting notion nonetheless. Thanks for the perspective.

  • Companies are/were simply selling what people in their focus groups wanted. Look at the “new” jeans that looked old (holes, faded), they could not keep them on the shelves. Also, business attire is now jeans, t-shirts, sports coats. All those happened in boom times but it was what the consumer wanted. Companies adapted product lines, shifted price points, etc. Now it's more important than ever for Brands to get inside the “lives” or their consumers. The old boardroom style focus groups that get inside the minds of 10 “representative” people needs to be long gone.

    What this means is that Brands need to re-think their go-to-market perspectives. What social media can do is to help brands get inside their consumers “lives” like never before. Can only do that by “living amongst them”. If humans can learn to speak Ape by living with Apes, then Brands should be able to do the same :-)

    I don't think that Premium anything is gone forever. People will splurge on certain products or services that have more meaning to them than Brands that don't. Would love to see some thought/discussion around how Brands can use new world marketing and interactions ie: social media to begin participating from what I would refer to as “in-network” by living amongst them. People are still going to buy stuff, so the Brands that people feel a stronger affinity with will win while the Brands that are pushing un-passioned product from the HQ at un-compromising consumers will (and need to) lose out.

  • Companies are/were simply selling what people in their focus groups wanted. Look at the “new” jeans that looked old (holes, faded), they could not keep them on the shelves. Also, business attire is now jeans, t-shirts, sports coats. All those happened in boom times but it was what the consumer wanted. Companies adapted product lines, shifted price points, etc. Now it's more important than ever for Brands to get inside the “lives” or their consumers. The old boardroom style focus groups that get inside the minds of 10 “representative” people needs to be long gone.

    What this means is that Brands need to re-think their go-to-market perspectives. What social media can do is to help brands get inside their consumers “lives” like never before. Can only do that by “living amongst them”. If humans can learn to speak Ape by living with Apes, then Brands should be able to do the same :-)

    I don't think that Premium anything is gone forever. People will splurge on certain products or services that have more meaning to them than Brands that don't. Would love to see some thought/discussion around how Brands can use new world marketing and interactions ie: social media to begin participating from what I would refer to as “in-network” by living amongst them. People are still going to buy stuff, so the Brands that people feel a stronger affinity with will win while the Brands that are pushing un-passioned product from the HQ at un-compromising consumers will (and need to) lose out.

  • Companies are/were simply selling what people in their focus groups wanted. Look at the “new” jeans that looked old (holes, faded), they could not keep them on the shelves. Also, business attire is now jeans, t-shirts, sports coats. All those happened in boom times but it was what the consumer wanted. Companies adapted product lines, shifted price points, etc. Now it's more important than ever for Brands to get inside the “lives” or their consumers. The old boardroom style focus groups that get inside the minds of 10 “representative” people needs to be long gone.

    What this means is that Brands need to re-think their go-to-market perspectives. What social media can do is to help brands get inside their consumers “lives” like never before. Can only do that by “living amongst them”. If humans can learn to speak Ape by living with Apes, then Brands should be able to do the same :-)

    I don't think that Premium anything is gone forever. People will splurge on certain products or services that have more meaning to them than Brands that don't. Would love to see some thought/discussion around how Brands can use new world marketing and interactions ie: social media to begin participating from what I would refer to as “in-network” by living amongst them. People are still going to buy stuff, so the Brands that people feel a stronger affinity with will win while the Brands that are pushing un-passioned product from the HQ at un-compromising consumers will (and need to) lose out.

  • Companies are/were simply selling what people in their focus groups wanted. Look at the “new” jeans that looked old (holes, faded), they could not keep them on the shelves. Also, business attire is now jeans, t-shirts, sports coats. All those happened in boom times but it was what the consumer wanted. Companies adapted product lines, shifted price points, etc. Now it's more important than ever for Brands to get inside the “lives” or their consumers. The old boardroom style focus groups that get inside the minds of 10 “representative” people needs to be long gone.

    What this means is that Brands need to re-think their go-to-market perspectives. What social media can do is to help brands get inside their consumers “lives” like never before. Can only do that by “living amongst them”. If humans can learn to speak Ape by living with Apes, then Brands should be able to do the same :-)

    I don't think that Premium anything is gone forever. People will splurge on certain products or services that have more meaning to them than Brands that don't. Would love to see some thought/discussion around how Brands can use new world marketing and interactions ie: social media to begin participating from what I would refer to as “in-network” by living amongst them. People are still going to buy stuff, so the Brands that people feel a stronger affinity with will win while the Brands that are pushing un-passioned product from the HQ at un-compromising consumers will (and need to) lose out.

  • Companies are/were simply selling what people in their focus groups wanted. Look at the “new” jeans that looked old (holes, faded), they could not keep them on the shelves. Also, business attire is now jeans, t-shirts, sports coats. All those happened in boom times but it was what the consumer wanted. Companies adapted product lines, shifted price points, etc. Now it's more important than ever for Brands to get inside the “lives” or their consumers. The old boardroom style focus groups that get inside the minds of 10 “representative” people needs to be long gone.

    What this means is that Brands need to re-think their go-to-market perspectives. What social media can do is to help brands get inside their consumers “lives” like never before. Can only do that by “living amongst them”. If humans can learn to speak Ape by living with Apes, then Brands should be able to do the same :-)

    I don't think that Premium anything is gone forever. People will splurge on certain products or services that have more meaning to them than Brands that don't. Would love to see some thought/discussion around how Brands can use new world marketing and interactions ie: social media to begin participating from what I would refer to as “in-network” by living amongst them. People are still going to buy stuff, so the Brands that people feel a stronger affinity with will win while the Brands that are pushing un-passioned product from the HQ at un-compromising consumers will (and need to) lose out.

  • Companies are/were simply selling what people in their focus groups wanted. Look at the “new” jeans that looked old (holes, faded), they could not keep them on the shelves. Also, business attire is now jeans, t-shirts, sports coats. All those happened in boom times but it was what the consumer wanted. Companies adapted product lines, shifted price points, etc. Now it's more important than ever for Brands to get inside the “lives” or their consumers. The old boardroom style focus groups that get inside the minds of 10 “representative” people needs to be long gone.

    What this means is that Brands need to re-think their go-to-market perspectives. What social media can do is to help brands get inside their consumers “lives” like never before. Can only do that by “living amongst them”. If humans can learn to speak Ape by living with Apes, then Brands should be able to do the same :-)

    I don't think that Premium anything is gone forever. People will splurge on certain products or services that have more meaning to them than Brands that don't. Would love to see some thought/discussion around how Brands can use new world marketing and interactions ie: social media to begin participating from what I would refer to as “in-network” by living amongst them. People are still going to buy stuff, so the Brands that people feel a stronger affinity with will win while the Brands that are pushing un-passioned product from the HQ at un-compromising consumers will (and need to) lose out.

  • Companies are/were simply selling what people in their focus groups wanted. Look at the “new” jeans that looked old (holes, faded), they could not keep them on the shelves. Also, business attire is now jeans, t-shirts, sports coats. All those happened in boom times but it was what the consumer wanted. Companies adapted product lines, shifted price points, etc. Now it's more important than ever for Brands to get inside the “lives” or their consumers. The old boardroom style focus groups that get inside the minds of 10 “representative” people needs to be long gone.

    What this means is that Brands need to re-think their go-to-market perspectives. What social media can do is to help brands get inside their consumers “lives” like never before. Can only do that by “living amongst them”. If humans can learn to speak Ape by living with Apes, then Brands should be able to do the same :-)

    I don't think that Premium anything is gone forever. People will splurge on certain products or services that have more meaning to them than Brands that don't. Would love to see some thought/discussion around how Brands can use new world marketing and interactions ie: social media to begin participating from what I would refer to as “in-network” by living amongst them. People are still going to buy stuff, so the Brands that people feel a stronger affinity with will win while the Brands that are pushing un-passioned product from the HQ at un-compromising consumers will (and need to) lose out.

  • Companies are/were simply selling what people in their focus groups wanted. Look at the “new” jeans that looked old (holes, faded), they could not keep them on the shelves. Also, business attire is now jeans, t-shirts, sports coats. All those happened in boom times but it was what the consumer wanted. Companies adapted product lines, shifted price points, etc. Now it's more important than ever for Brands to get inside the “lives” or their consumers. The old boardroom style focus groups that get inside the minds of 10 “representative” people needs to be long gone.

    What this means is that Brands need to re-think their go-to-market perspectives. What social media can do is to help brands get inside their consumers “lives” like never before. Can only do that by “living amongst them”. If humans can learn to speak Ape by living with Apes, then Brands should be able to do the same :-)

    I don't think that Premium anything is gone forever. People will splurge on certain products or services that have more meaning to them than Brands that don't. Would love to see some thought/discussion around how Brands can use new world marketing and interactions ie: social media to begin participating from what I would refer to as “in-network” by living amongst them. People are still going to buy stuff, so the Brands that people feel a stronger affinity with will win while the Brands that are pushing un-passioned product from the HQ at un-compromising consumers will (and need to) lose out.

  • Companies are/were simply selling what people in their focus groups wanted. Look at the “new” jeans that looked old (holes, faded), they could not keep them on the shelves. Also, business attire is now jeans, t-shirts, sports coats. All those happened in boom times but it was what the consumer wanted. Companies adapted product lines, shifted price points, etc. Now it's more important than ever for Brands to get inside the “lives” or their consumers. The old boardroom style focus groups that get inside the minds of 10 “representative” people needs to be long gone.

    What this means is that Brands need to re-think their go-to-market perspectives. What social media can do is to help brands get inside their consumers “lives” like never before. Can only do that by “living amongst them”. If humans can learn to speak Ape by living with Apes, then Brands should be able to do the same :-)

    I don't think that Premium anything is gone forever. People will splurge on certain products or services that have more meaning to them than Brands that don't. Would love to see some thought/discussion around how Brands can use new world marketing and interactions ie: social media to begin participating from what I would refer to as “in-network” by living amongst them. People are still going to buy stuff, so the Brands that people feel a stronger affinity with will win while the Brands that are pushing un-passioned product from the HQ at un-compromising consumers will (and need to) lose out.

  • Companies are/were simply selling what people in their focus groups wanted. Look at the “new” jeans that looked old (holes, faded), they could not keep them on the shelves. Also, business attire is now jeans, t-shirts, sports coats. All those happened in boom times but it was what the consumer wanted. Companies adapted product lines, shifted price points, etc. Now it's more important than ever for Brands to get inside the “lives” or their consumers. The old boardroom style focus groups that get inside the minds of 10 “representative” people needs to be long gone.

    What this means is that Brands need to re-think their go-to-market perspectives. What social media can do is to help brands get inside their consumers “lives” like never before. Can only do that by “living amongst them”. If humans can learn to speak Ape by living with Apes, then Brands should be able to do the same :-)

    I don't think that Premium anything is gone forever. People will splurge on certain products or services that have more meaning to them than Brands that don't. Would love to see some thought/discussion around how Brands can use new world marketing and interactions ie: social media to begin participating from what I would refer to as “in-network” by living amongst them. People are still going to buy stuff, so the Brands that people feel a stronger affinity with will win while the Brands that are pushing un-passioned product from the HQ at un-compromising consumers will (and need to) lose out.

  • Companies are/were simply selling what people in their focus groups wanted. Look at the “new” jeans that looked old (holes, faded), they could not keep them on the shelves. Also, business attire is now jeans, t-shirts, sports coats. All those happened in boom times but it was what the consumer wanted. Companies adapted product lines, shifted price points, etc. Now it's more important than ever for Brands to get inside the “lives” or their consumers. The old boardroom style focus groups that get inside the minds of 10 “representative” people needs to be long gone.

    What this means is that Brands need to re-think their go-to-market perspectives. What social media can do is to help brands get inside their consumers “lives” like never before. Can only do that by “living amongst them”. If humans can learn to speak Ape by living with Apes, then Brands should be able to do the same :-)

    I don't think that Premium anything is gone forever. People will splurge on certain products or services that have more meaning to them than Brands that don't. Would love to see some thought/discussion around how Brands can use new world marketing and interactions ie: social media to begin participating from what I would refer to as “in-network” by living amongst them. People are still going to buy stuff, so the Brands that people feel a stronger affinity with will win while the Brands that are pushing un-passioned product from the HQ at un-compromising consumers will (and need to) lose out.

  • Companies are/were simply selling what people in their focus groups wanted. Look at the “new” jeans that looked old (holes, faded), they could not keep them on the shelves. Also, business attire is now jeans, t-shirts, sports coats. All those happened in boom times but it was what the consumer wanted. Companies adapted product lines, shifted price points, etc. Now it's more important than ever for Brands to get inside the “lives” or their consumers. The old boardroom style focus groups that get inside the minds of 10 “representative” people needs to be long gone.

    What this means is that Brands need to re-think their go-to-market perspectives. What social media can do is to help brands get inside their consumers “lives” like never before. Can only do that by “living amongst them”. If humans can learn to speak Ape by living with Apes, then Brands should be able to do the same :-)

    I don't think that Premium anything is gone forever. People will splurge on certain products or services that have more meaning to them than Brands that don't. Would love to see some thought/discussion around how Brands can use new world marketing and interactions ie: social media to begin participating from what I would refer to as “in-network” by living amongst them. People are still going to buy stuff, so the Brands that people feel a stronger affinity with will win while the Brands that are pushing un-passioned product from the HQ at un-compromising consumers will (and need to) lose out.

  • Companies are/were simply selling what people in their focus groups wanted. Look at the “new” jeans that looked old (holes, faded), they could not keep them on the shelves. Also, business attire is now jeans, t-shirts, sports coats. All those happened in boom times but it was what the consumer wanted. Companies adapted product lines, shifted price points, etc. Now it's more important than ever for Brands to get inside the “lives” or their consumers. The old boardroom style focus groups that get inside the minds of 10 “representative” people needs to be long gone.

    What this means is that Brands need to re-think their go-to-market perspectives. What social media can do is to help brands get inside their consumers “lives” like never before. Can only do that by “living amongst them”. If humans can learn to speak Ape by living with Apes, then Brands should be able to do the same :-)

    I don't think that Premium anything is gone forever. People will splurge on certain products or services that have more meaning to them than Brands that don't. Would love to see some thought/discussion around how Brands can use new world marketing and interactions ie: social media to begin participating from what I would refer to as “in-network” by living amongst them. People are still going to buy stuff, so the Brands that people feel a stronger affinity with will win while the Brands that are pushing un-passioned product from the HQ at un-compromising consumers will (and need to) lose out.

    • Excellent points, Mr. Breed. Thank you for this. I'm right there with you, too. I'd love to see more of a discussion about how brands can live in-network with customers and build that affinity. For those who have made it this far in the comments, please … your thoughts?

  • Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? http://bit.ly/127SN7

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • @JasonFalls Enjoyed your article (http://tinyurl.com/czgw2r) ie:recession changing our thinking & spending habits. Time piece was excellent.

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Thanks Celeste. If I get you right, you're perhaps suggesting that while some brands may fall out of favor because of the value, the premium brands that have done something exceptional to build that customer relationship will survive those opportunities for folks to trade “down” as it were. I love the insight. Thank you!

  • Thanks Celeste. If I get you right, you're perhaps suggesting that while some brands may fall out of favor because of the value, the premium brands that have done something exceptional to build that customer relationship will survive those opportunities for folks to trade “down” as it were. I love the insight. Thank you!

  • Thanks Celeste. If I get you right, you're perhaps suggesting that while some brands may fall out of favor because of the value, the premium brands that have done something exceptional to build that customer relationship will survive those opportunities for folks to trade “down” as it were. I love the insight. Thank you!

  • Thanks Celeste. If I get you right, you're perhaps suggesting that while some brands may fall out of favor because of the value, the premium brands that have done something exceptional to build that customer relationship will survive those opportunities for folks to trade “down” as it were. I love the insight. Thank you!

  • Thanks Celeste. If I get you right, you're perhaps suggesting that while some brands may fall out of favor because of the value, the premium brands that have done something exceptional to build that customer relationship will survive those opportunities for folks to trade “down” as it were. I love the insight. Thank you!

  • Thanks Celeste. If I get you right, you're perhaps suggesting that while some brands may fall out of favor because of the value, the premium brands that have done something exceptional to build that customer relationship will survive those opportunities for folks to trade “down” as it were. I love the insight. Thank you!

  • Thanks Celeste. If I get you right, you're perhaps suggesting that while some brands may fall out of favor because of the value, the premium brands that have done something exceptional to build that customer relationship will survive those opportunities for folks to trade “down” as it were. I love the insight. Thank you!

  • Thanks Celeste. If I get you right, you're perhaps suggesting that while some brands may fall out of favor because of the value, the premium brands that have done something exceptional to build that customer relationship will survive those opportunities for folks to trade “down” as it were. I love the insight. Thank you!

  • Thanks Celeste. If I get you right, you're perhaps suggesting that while some brands may fall out of favor because of the value, the premium brands that have done something exceptional to build that customer relationship will survive those opportunities for folks to trade “down” as it were. I love the insight. Thank you!

  • Thanks Celeste. If I get you right, you're perhaps suggesting that while some brands may fall out of favor because of the value, the premium brands that have done something exceptional to build that customer relationship will survive those opportunities for folks to trade “down” as it were. I love the insight. Thank you!

  • Thanks Celeste. If I get you right, you're perhaps suggesting that while some brands may fall out of favor because of the value, the premium brands that have done something exceptional to build that customer relationship will survive those opportunities for folks to trade “down” as it were. I love the insight. Thank you!

  • Thanks Celeste. If I get you right, you're perhaps suggesting that while some brands may fall out of favor because of the value, the premium brands that have done something exceptional to build that customer relationship will survive those opportunities for folks to trade “down” as it were. I love the insight. Thank you!

  • Interesting perspective. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Interesting perspective. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Interesting perspective. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Interesting perspective. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Interesting perspective. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Interesting perspective. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Interesting perspective. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Interesting perspective. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Interesting perspective. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Interesting perspective. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Interesting perspective. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Interesting perspective. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks for hittin' the SME, Reid. I tend to think you're probably right. But I can certainly see a trend away from spend which can hurt a lot of folks. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks for hittin' the SME, Reid. I tend to think you're probably right. But I can certainly see a trend away from spend which can hurt a lot of folks. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks for hittin' the SME, Reid. I tend to think you're probably right. But I can certainly see a trend away from spend which can hurt a lot of folks. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks for hittin' the SME, Reid. I tend to think you're probably right. But I can certainly see a trend away from spend which can hurt a lot of folks. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks for hittin' the SME, Reid. I tend to think you're probably right. But I can certainly see a trend away from spend which can hurt a lot of folks. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks for hittin' the SME, Reid. I tend to think you're probably right. But I can certainly see a trend away from spend which can hurt a lot of folks. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks for hittin' the SME, Reid. I tend to think you're probably right. But I can certainly see a trend away from spend which can hurt a lot of folks. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks for hittin' the SME, Reid. I tend to think you're probably right. But I can certainly see a trend away from spend which can hurt a lot of folks. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks for hittin' the SME, Reid. I tend to think you're probably right. But I can certainly see a trend away from spend which can hurt a lot of folks. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks for hittin' the SME, Reid. I tend to think you're probably right. But I can certainly see a trend away from spend which can hurt a lot of folks. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks for hittin' the SME, Reid. I tend to think you're probably right. But I can certainly see a trend away from spend which can hurt a lot of folks. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks for hittin' the SME, Reid. I tend to think you're probably right. But I can certainly see a trend away from spend which can hurt a lot of folks. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? http://bit.ly/127SN7

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? | Social Media Explorer – http://sn.im/gwkak

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  • Will The Economy Change Our Spending Habits? | Social Media Explorer http://ow.ly/499t

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  • Celeste Verderosa

    Its changing things for sure, but I don't feel like its going to change the consumer's relationship to a brand if its a relationship that holds particular significance for the consumer. In the case of my husband, he'd rather survive on pasta and spiced up tomato sauce than ever give up on Diet Coke. You will never see him buy Diet Pepsi or Diet BigK. It just won't happen.

    That said I feel like there has been an adjustment at our house in terms of the brands and overall products that we've kept in the household. And by that I mean, I feel like if we are going to spend money on something 'premium' it really needs to be something that we see as having an intrinsic value for the whole household. So I've started cutting little things: the Rebecca Grace milk that costs close to $6 for half gallon including the deposit unfortunately competes with more modest staples – so its out. Kroger – for as cheap as you can get things – always sells total f'n crap for produce and meat, so we've switched over completely to a CSA for spring, summer and fall to save us some cash and force us to plan and eat meals at home. I guess this is an example of us finding a better brand with better value (the CSA) even though it runs slightly more expensive (you have to pay the whole thing upfront). The upside is we aren't chucking as much because what we get isn't complete crap. We've cut things like the gym membership and the buying of a car has been put on hold. LOL – Despite the car literally falling apart (seriously – the windows won't stay put once the car moves).

    I'm not sure if this is what you were looking for in terms of a response. I feel like in this household at least we are readjusting our spending habits to keep purchasing the brands we feel like we can't live without. As for the ones that we can live without, well maybe we'll try them again next decade.

  • Celeste Verderosa

    Its changing things for sure, but I don't feel like its going to change the consumer's relationship to a brand if its a relationship that holds particular significance for the consumer. In the case of my husband, he'd rather survive on pasta and spiced up tomato sauce than ever give up on Diet Coke. You will never see him buy Diet Pepsi or Diet BigK. It just won't happen.

    That said I feel like there has been an adjustment at our house in terms of the brands and overall products that we've kept in the household. And by that I mean, I feel like if we are going to spend money on something 'premium' it really needs to be something that we see as having an intrinsic value for the whole household. So I've started cutting little things: the Rebecca Grace milk that costs close to $6 for half gallon including the deposit unfortunately competes with more modest staples – so its out. Kroger – for as cheap as you can get things – always sells total f'n crap for produce and meat, so we've switched over completely to a CSA for spring, summer and fall to save us some cash and force us to plan and eat meals at home. I guess this is an example of us finding a better brand with better value (the CSA) even though it runs slightly more expensive (you have to pay the whole thing upfront). The upside is we aren't chucking as much because what we get isn't complete crap. We've cut things like the gym membership and the buying of a car has been put on hold. LOL – Despite the car literally falling apart (seriously – the windows won't stay put once the car moves).

    I'm not sure if this is what you were looking for in terms of a response. I feel like in this household at least we are readjusting our spending habits to keep purchasing the brands we feel like we can't live without. As for the ones that we can live without, well maybe we'll try them again next decade.

  • Celeste Verderosa

    Its changing things for sure, but I don't feel like its going to change the consumer's relationship to a brand if its a relationship that holds particular significance for the consumer. In the case of my husband, he'd rather survive on pasta and spiced up tomato sauce than ever give up on Diet Coke. You will never see him buy Diet Pepsi or Diet BigK. It just won't happen.

    That said I feel like there has been an adjustment at our house in terms of the brands and overall products that we've kept in the household. And by that I mean, I feel like if we are going to spend money on something 'premium' it really needs to be something that we see as having an intrinsic value for the whole household. So I've started cutting little things: the Rebecca Grace milk that costs close to $6 for half gallon including the deposit unfortunately competes with more modest staples – so its out. Kroger – for as cheap as you can get things – always sells total f'n crap for produce and meat, so we've switched over completely to a CSA for spring, summer and fall to save us some cash and force us to plan and eat meals at home. I guess this is an example of us finding a better brand with better value (the CSA) even though it runs slightly more expensive (you have to pay the whole thing upfront). The upside is we aren't chucking as much because what we get isn't complete crap. We've cut things like the gym membership and the buying of a car has been put on hold. LOL – Despite the car literally falling apart (seriously – the windows won't stay put once the car moves).

    I'm not sure if this is what you were looking for in terms of a response. I feel like in this household at least we are readjusting our spending habits to keep purchasing the brands we feel like we can't live without. As for the ones that we can live without, well maybe we'll try them again next decade.

  • Celeste Verderosa

    Its changing things for sure, but I don't feel like its going to change the consumer's relationship to a brand if its a relationship that holds particular significance for the consumer. In the case of my husband, he'd rather survive on pasta and spiced up tomato sauce than ever give up on Diet Coke. You will never see him buy Diet Pepsi or Diet BigK. It just won't happen.

    That said I feel like there has been an adjustment at our house in terms of the brands and overall products that we've kept in the household. And by that I mean, I feel like if we are going to spend money on something 'premium' it really needs to be something that we see as having an intrinsic value for the whole household. So I've started cutting little things: the Rebecca Grace milk that costs close to $6 for half gallon including the deposit unfortunately competes with more modest staples – so its out. Kroger – for as cheap as you can get things – always sells total f'n crap for produce and meat, so we've switched over completely to a CSA for spring, summer and fall to save us some cash and force us to plan and eat meals at home. I guess this is an example of us finding a better brand with better value (the CSA) even though it runs slightly more expensive (you have to pay the whole thing upfront). The upside is we aren't chucking as much because what we get isn't complete crap. We've cut things like the gym membership and the buying of a car has been put on hold. LOL – Despite the car literally falling apart (seriously – the windows won't stay put once the car moves).

    I'm not sure if this is what you were looking for in terms of a response. I feel like in this household at least we are readjusting our spending habits to keep purchasing the brands we feel like we can't live without. As for the ones that we can live without, well maybe we'll try them again next decade.

  • Celeste Verderosa

    Its changing things for sure, but I don't feel like its going to change the consumer's relationship to a brand if its a relationship that holds particular significance for the consumer. In the case of my husband, he'd rather survive on pasta and spiced up tomato sauce than ever give up on Diet Coke. You will never see him buy Diet Pepsi or Diet BigK. It just won't happen.

    That said I feel like there has been an adjustment at our house in terms of the brands and overall products that we've kept in the household. And by that I mean, I feel like if we are going to spend money on something 'premium' it really needs to be something that we see as having an intrinsic value for the whole household. So I've started cutting little things: the Rebecca Grace milk that costs close to $6 for half gallon including the deposit unfortunately competes with more modest staples – so its out. Kroger – for as cheap as you can get things – always sells total f'n crap for produce and meat, so we've switched over completely to a CSA for spring, summer and fall to save us some cash and force us to plan and eat meals at home. I guess this is an example of us finding a better brand with better value (the CSA) even though it runs slightly more expensive (you have to pay the whole thing upfront). The upside is we aren't chucking as much because what we get isn't complete crap. We've cut things like the gym membership and the buying of a car has been put on hold. LOL – Despite the car literally falling apart (seriously – the windows won't stay put once the car moves).

    I'm not sure if this is what you were looking for in terms of a response. I feel like in this household at least we are readjusting our spending habits to keep purchasing the brands we feel like we can't live without. As for the ones that we can live without, well maybe we'll try them again next decade.

  • Celeste Verderosa

    Its changing things for sure, but I don't feel like its going to change the consumer's relationship to a brand if its a relationship that holds particular significance for the consumer. In the case of my husband, he'd rather survive on pasta and spiced up tomato sauce than ever give up on Diet Coke. You will never see him buy Diet Pepsi or Diet BigK. It just won't happen.

    That said I feel like there has been an adjustment at our house in terms of the brands and overall products that we've kept in the household. And by that I mean, I feel like if we are going to spend money on something 'premium' it really needs to be something that we see as having an intrinsic value for the whole household. So I've started cutting little things: the Rebecca Grace milk that costs close to $6 for half gallon including the deposit unfortunately competes with more modest staples – so its out. Kroger – for as cheap as you can get things – always sells total f'n crap for produce and meat, so we've switched over completely to a CSA for spring, summer and fall to save us some cash and force us to plan and eat meals at home. I guess this is an example of us finding a better brand with better value (the CSA) even though it runs slightly more expensive (you have to pay the whole thing upfront). The upside is we aren't chucking as much because what we get isn't complete crap. We've cut things like the gym membership and the buying of a car has been put on hold. LOL – Despite the car literally falling apart (seriously – the windows won't stay put once the car moves).

    I'm not sure if this is what you were looking for in terms of a response. I feel like in this household at least we are readjusting our spending habits to keep purchasing the brands we feel like we can't live without. As for the ones that we can live without, well maybe we'll try them again next decade.

  • Celeste Verderosa

    Its changing things for sure, but I don't feel like its going to change the consumer's relationship to a brand if its a relationship that holds particular significance for the consumer. In the case of my husband, he'd rather survive on pasta and spiced up tomato sauce than ever give up on Diet Coke. You will never see him buy Diet Pepsi or Diet BigK. It just won't happen.

    That said I feel like there has been an adjustment at our house in terms of the brands and overall products that we've kept in the household. And by that I mean, I feel like if we are going to spend money on something 'premium' it really needs to be something that we see as having an intrinsic value for the whole household. So I've started cutting little things: the Rebecca Grace milk that costs close to $6 for half gallon including the deposit unfortunately competes with more modest staples – so its out. Kroger – for as cheap as you can get things – always sells total f'n crap for produce and meat, so we've switched over completely to a CSA for spring, summer and fall to save us some cash and force us to plan and eat meals at home. I guess this is an example of us finding a better brand with better value (the CSA) even though it runs slightly more expensive (you have to pay the whole thing upfront). The upside is we aren't chucking as much because what we get isn't complete crap. We've cut things like the gym membership and the buying of a car has been put on hold. LOL – Despite the car literally falling apart (seriously – the windows won't stay put once the car moves).

    I'm not sure if this is what you were looking for in terms of a response. I feel like in this household at least we are readjusting our spending habits to keep purchasing the brands we feel like we can't live without. As for the ones that we can live without, well maybe we'll try them again next decade.

  • Celeste Verderosa

    Its changing things for sure, but I don't feel like its going to change the consumer's relationship to a brand if its a relationship that holds particular significance for the consumer. In the case of my husband, he'd rather survive on pasta and spiced up tomato sauce than ever give up on Diet Coke. You will never see him buy Diet Pepsi or Diet BigK. It just won't happen.

    That said I feel like there has been an adjustment at our house in terms of the brands and overall products that we've kept in the household. And by that I mean, I feel like if we are going to spend money on something 'premium' it really needs to be something that we see as having an intrinsic value for the whole household. So I've started cutting little things: the Rebecca Grace milk that costs close to $6 for half gallon including the deposit unfortunately competes with more modest staples – so its out. Kroger – for as cheap as you can get things – always sells total f'n crap for produce and meat, so we've switched over completely to a CSA for spring, summer and fall to save us some cash and force us to plan and eat meals at home. I guess this is an example of us finding a better brand with better value (the CSA) even though it runs slightly more expensive (you have to pay the whole thing upfront). The upside is we aren't chucking as much because what we get isn't complete crap. We've cut things like the gym membership and the buying of a car has been put on hold. LOL – Despite the car literally falling apart (seriously – the windows won't stay put once the car moves).

    I'm not sure if this is what you were looking for in terms of a response. I feel like in this household at least we are readjusting our spending habits to keep purchasing the brands we feel like we can't live without. As for the ones that we can live without, well maybe we'll try them again next decade.

  • Celeste Verderosa

    Its changing things for sure, but I don't feel like its going to change the consumer's relationship to a brand if its a relationship that holds particular significance for the consumer. In the case of my husband, he'd rather survive on pasta and spiced up tomato sauce than ever give up on Diet Coke. You will never see him buy Diet Pepsi or Diet BigK. It just won't happen.

    That said I feel like there has been an adjustment at our house in terms of the brands and overall products that we've kept in the household. And by that I mean, I feel like if we are going to spend money on something 'premium' it really needs to be something that we see as having an intrinsic value for the whole household. So I've started cutting little things: the Rebecca Grace milk that costs close to $6 for half gallon including the deposit unfortunately competes with more modest staples – so its out. Kroger – for as cheap as you can get things – always sells total f'n crap for produce and meat, so we've switched over completely to a CSA for spring, summer and fall to save us some cash and force us to plan and eat meals at home. I guess this is an example of us finding a better brand with better value (the CSA) even though it runs slightly more expensive (you have to pay the whole thing upfront). The upside is we aren't chucking as much because what we get isn't complete crap. We've cut things like the gym membership and the buying of a car has been put on hold. LOL – Despite the car literally falling apart (seriously – the windows won't stay put once the car moves).

    I'm not sure if this is what you were looking for in terms of a response. I feel like in this household at least we are readjusting our spending habits to keep purchasing the brands we feel like we can't live without. As for the ones that we can live without, well maybe we'll try them again next decade.

  • Celeste Verderosa

    Its changing things for sure, but I don't feel like its going to change the consumer's relationship to a brand if its a relationship that holds particular significance for the consumer. In the case of my husband, he'd rather survive on pasta and spiced up tomato sauce than ever give up on Diet Coke. You will never see him buy Diet Pepsi or Diet BigK. It just won't happen.

    That said I feel like there has been an adjustment at our house in terms of the brands and overall products that we've kept in the household. And by that I mean, I feel like if we are going to spend money on something 'premium' it really needs to be something that we see as having an intrinsic value for the whole household. So I've started cutting little things: the Rebecca Grace milk that costs close to $6 for half gallon including the deposit unfortunately competes with more modest staples – so its out. Kroger – for as cheap as you can get things – always sells total f'n crap for produce and meat, so we've switched over completely to a CSA for spring, summer and fall to save us some cash and force us to plan and eat meals at home. I guess this is an example of us finding a better brand with better value (the CSA) even though it runs slightly more expensive (you have to pay the whole thing upfront). The upside is we aren't chucking as much because what we get isn't complete crap. We've cut things like the gym membership and the buying of a car has been put on hold. LOL – Despite the car literally falling apart (seriously – the windows won't stay put once the car moves).

    I'm not sure if this is what you were looking for in terms of a response. I feel like in this household at least we are readjusting our spending habits to keep purchasing the brands we feel like we can't live without. As for the ones that we can live without, well maybe we'll try them again next decade.

  • Celeste Verderosa

    Its changing things for sure, but I don't feel like its going to change the consumer's relationship to a brand if its a relationship that holds particular significance for the consumer. In the case of my husband, he'd rather survive on pasta and spiced up tomato sauce than ever give up on Diet Coke. You will never see him buy Diet Pepsi or Diet BigK. It just won't happen.

    That said I feel like there has been an adjustment at our house in terms of the brands and overall products that we've kept in the household. And by that I mean, I feel like if we are going to spend money on something 'premium' it really needs to be something that we see as having an intrinsic value for the whole household. So I've started cutting little things: the Rebecca Grace milk that costs close to $6 for half gallon including the deposit unfortunately competes with more modest staples – so its out. Kroger – for as cheap as you can get things – always sells total f'n crap for produce and meat, so we've switched over completely to a CSA for spring, summer and fall to save us some cash and force us to plan and eat meals at home. I guess this is an example of us finding a better brand with better value (the CSA) even though it runs slightly more expensive (you have to pay the whole thing upfront). The upside is we aren't chucking as much because what we get isn't complete crap. We've cut things like the gym membership and the buying of a car has been put on hold. LOL – Despite the car literally falling apart (seriously – the windows won't stay put once the car moves).

    I'm not sure if this is what you were looking for in terms of a response. I feel like in this household at least we are readjusting our spending habits to keep purchasing the brands we feel like we can't live without. As for the ones that we can live without, well maybe we'll try them again next decade.

  • Celeste Verderosa

    Its changing things for sure, but I don't feel like its going to change the consumer's relationship to a brand if its a relationship that holds particular significance for the consumer. In the case of my husband, he'd rather survive on pasta and spiced up tomato sauce than ever give up on Diet Coke. You will never see him buy Diet Pepsi or Diet BigK. It just won't happen.

    That said I feel like there has been an adjustment at our house in terms of the brands and overall products that we've kept in the household. And by that I mean, I feel like if we are going to spend money on something 'premium' it really needs to be something that we see as having an intrinsic value for the whole household. So I've started cutting little things: the Rebecca Grace milk that costs close to $6 for half gallon including the deposit unfortunately competes with more modest staples – so its out. Kroger – for as cheap as you can get things – always sells total f'n crap for produce and meat, so we've switched over completely to a CSA for spring, summer and fall to save us some cash and force us to plan and eat meals at home. I guess this is an example of us finding a better brand with better value (the CSA) even though it runs slightly more expensive (you have to pay the whole thing upfront). The upside is we aren't chucking as much because what we get isn't complete crap. We've cut things like the gym membership and the buying of a car has been put on hold. LOL – Despite the car literally falling apart (seriously – the windows won't stay put once the car moves).

    I'm not sure if this is what you were looking for in terms of a response. I feel like in this household at least we are readjusting our spending habits to keep purchasing the brands we feel like we can't live without. As for the ones that we can live without, well maybe we'll try them again next decade.

  • Celeste Verderosa

    Its changing things for sure, but I don't feel like its going to change the consumer's relationship to a brand if its a relationship that holds particular significance for the consumer. In the case of my husband, he'd rather survive on pasta and spiced up tomato sauce than ever give up on Diet Coke. You will never see him buy Diet Pepsi or Diet BigK. It just won't happen.

    That said I feel like there has been an adjustment at our house in terms of the brands and overall products that we've kept in the household. And by that I mean, I feel like if we are going to spend money on something 'premium' it really needs to be something that we see as having an intrinsic value for the whole household. So I've started cutting little things: the Rebecca Grace milk that costs close to $6 for half gallon including the deposit unfortunately competes with more modest staples – so its out. Kroger – for as cheap as you can get things – always sells total f'n crap for produce and meat, so we've switched over completely to a CSA for spring, summer and fall to save us some cash and force us to plan and eat meals at home. I guess this is an example of us finding a better brand with better value (the CSA) even though it runs slightly more expensive (you have to pay the whole thing upfront). The upside is we aren't chucking as much because what we get isn't complete crap. We've cut things like the gym membership and the buying of a car has been put on hold. LOL – Despite the car literally falling apart (seriously – the windows won't stay put once the car moves).

    I'm not sure if this is what you were looking for in terms of a response. I feel like in this household at least we are readjusting our spending habits to keep purchasing the brands we feel like we can't live without. As for the ones that we can live without, well maybe we'll try them again next decade.

    • Thanks Celeste. If I get you right, you're perhaps suggesting that while some brands may fall out of favor because of the value, the premium brands that have done something exceptional to build that customer relationship will survive those opportunities for folks to trade “down” as it were. I love the insight. Thank you!

  • I'm still committed to certain things. McCormick's will never be Grey Goose (although I'm completely willing to substitute Absolut). I still buy my dogs Science Diet but they get the generic treats now. And Dr. Thunder will never ever take the place of my Dr. Pepper. But other things? Bring on the generics. There will always be a place for premium products because in some cases, they're just a better buy. My car is a little more expensive (although hardly luxury) but it has a significantly lower cost of ownership than others that may have a cheaper payment.

    Convince me that it's worth it to buy the more expensive brand and I'll cut in other areas to do it. But that usually occurs in only certain categories. Most foods are never going to be better in the name brand. Cars and liquor are.

  • I'm still committed to certain things. McCormick's will never be Grey Goose (although I'm completely willing to substitute Absolut). I still buy my dogs Science Diet but they get the generic treats now. And Dr. Thunder will never ever take the place of my Dr. Pepper. But other things? Bring on the generics. There will always be a place for premium products because in some cases, they're just a better buy. My car is a little more expensive (although hardly luxury) but it has a significantly lower cost of ownership than others that may have a cheaper payment.

    Convince me that it's worth it to buy the more expensive brand and I'll cut in other areas to do it. But that usually occurs in only certain categories. Most foods are never going to be better in the name brand. Cars and liquor are.

  • I'm still committed to certain things. McCormick's will never be Grey Goose (although I'm completely willing to substitute Absolut). I still buy my dogs Science Diet but they get the generic treats now. And Dr. Thunder will never ever take the place of my Dr. Pepper. But other things? Bring on the generics. There will always be a place for premium products because in some cases, they're just a better buy. My car is a little more expensive (although hardly luxury) but it has a significantly lower cost of ownership than others that may have a cheaper payment.

    Convince me that it's worth it to buy the more expensive brand and I'll cut in other areas to do it. But that usually occurs in only certain categories. Most foods are never going to be better in the name brand. Cars and liquor are.

  • I'm still committed to certain things. McCormick's will never be Grey Goose (although I'm completely willing to substitute Absolut). I still buy my dogs Science Diet but they get the generic treats now. And Dr. Thunder will never ever take the place of my Dr. Pepper. But other things? Bring on the generics. There will always be a place for premium products because in some cases, they're just a better buy. My car is a little more expensive (although hardly luxury) but it has a significantly lower cost of ownership than others that may have a cheaper payment.

    Convince me that it's worth it to buy the more expensive brand and I'll cut in other areas to do it. But that usually occurs in only certain categories. Most foods are never going to be better in the name brand. Cars and liquor are.

  • I'm still committed to certain things. McCormick's will never be Grey Goose (although I'm completely willing to substitute Absolut). I still buy my dogs Science Diet but they get the generic treats now. And Dr. Thunder will never ever take the place of my Dr. Pepper. But other things? Bring on the generics. There will always be a place for premium products because in some cases, they're just a better buy. My car is a little more expensive (although hardly luxury) but it has a significantly lower cost of ownership than others that may have a cheaper payment.

    Convince me that it's worth it to buy the more expensive brand and I'll cut in other areas to do it. But that usually occurs in only certain categories. Most foods are never going to be better in the name brand. Cars and liquor are.

  • I'm still committed to certain things. McCormick's will never be Grey Goose (although I'm completely willing to substitute Absolut). I still buy my dogs Science Diet but they get the generic treats now. And Dr. Thunder will never ever take the place of my Dr. Pepper. But other things? Bring on the generics. There will always be a place for premium products because in some cases, they're just a better buy. My car is a little more expensive (although hardly luxury) but it has a significantly lower cost of ownership than others that may have a cheaper payment.

    Convince me that it's worth it to buy the more expensive brand and I'll cut in other areas to do it. But that usually occurs in only certain categories. Most foods are never going to be better in the name brand. Cars and liquor are.

  • I'm still committed to certain things. McCormick's will never be Grey Goose (although I'm completely willing to substitute Absolut). I still buy my dogs Science Diet but they get the generic treats now. And Dr. Thunder will never ever take the place of my Dr. Pepper. But other things? Bring on the generics. There will always be a place for premium products because in some cases, they're just a better buy. My car is a little more expensive (although hardly luxury) but it has a significantly lower cost of ownership than others that may have a cheaper payment.

    Convince me that it's worth it to buy the more expensive brand and I'll cut in other areas to do it. But that usually occurs in only certain categories. Most foods are never going to be better in the name brand. Cars and liquor are.

  • I'm still committed to certain things. McCormick's will never be Grey Goose (although I'm completely willing to substitute Absolut). I still buy my dogs Science Diet but they get the generic treats now. And Dr. Thunder will never ever take the place of my Dr. Pepper. But other things? Bring on the generics. There will always be a place for premium products because in some cases, they're just a better buy. My car is a little more expensive (although hardly luxury) but it has a significantly lower cost of ownership than others that may have a cheaper payment.

    Convince me that it's worth it to buy the more expensive brand and I'll cut in other areas to do it. But that usually occurs in only certain categories. Most foods are never going to be better in the name brand. Cars and liquor are.

  • I'm still committed to certain things. McCormick's will never be Grey Goose (although I'm completely willing to substitute Absolut). I still buy my dogs Science Diet but they get the generic treats now. And Dr. Thunder will never ever take the place of my Dr. Pepper. But other things? Bring on the generics. There will always be a place for premium products because in some cases, they're just a better buy. My car is a little more expensive (although hardly luxury) but it has a significantly lower cost of ownership than others that may have a cheaper payment.

    Convince me that it's worth it to buy the more expensive brand and I'll cut in other areas to do it. But that usually occurs in only certain categories. Most foods are never going to be better in the name brand. Cars and liquor are.

  • I'm still committed to certain things. McCormick's will never be Grey Goose (although I'm completely willing to substitute Absolut). I still buy my dogs Science Diet but they get the generic treats now. And Dr. Thunder will never ever take the place of my Dr. Pepper. But other things? Bring on the generics. There will always be a place for premium products because in some cases, they're just a better buy. My car is a little more expensive (although hardly luxury) but it has a significantly lower cost of ownership than others that may have a cheaper payment.

    Convince me that it's worth it to buy the more expensive brand and I'll cut in other areas to do it. But that usually occurs in only certain categories. Most foods are never going to be better in the name brand. Cars and liquor are.

  • I'm still committed to certain things. McCormick's will never be Grey Goose (although I'm completely willing to substitute Absolut). I still buy my dogs Science Diet but they get the generic treats now. And Dr. Thunder will never ever take the place of my Dr. Pepper. But other things? Bring on the generics. There will always be a place for premium products because in some cases, they're just a better buy. My car is a little more expensive (although hardly luxury) but it has a significantly lower cost of ownership than others that may have a cheaper payment.

    Convince me that it's worth it to buy the more expensive brand and I'll cut in other areas to do it. But that usually occurs in only certain categories. Most foods are never going to be better in the name brand. Cars and liquor are.

  • I'm still committed to certain things. McCormick's will never be Grey Goose (although I'm completely willing to substitute Absolut). I still buy my dogs Science Diet but they get the generic treats now. And Dr. Thunder will never ever take the place of my Dr. Pepper. But other things? Bring on the generics. There will always be a place for premium products because in some cases, they're just a better buy. My car is a little more expensive (although hardly luxury) but it has a significantly lower cost of ownership than others that may have a cheaper payment.

    Convince me that it's worth it to buy the more expensive brand and I'll cut in other areas to do it. But that usually occurs in only certain categories. Most foods are never going to be better in the name brand. Cars and liquor are.

  • I'm still committed to certain things. McCormick's will never be Grey Goose (although I'm completely willing to substitute Absolut). I still buy my dogs Science Diet but they get the generic treats now. And Dr. Thunder will never ever take the place of my Dr. Pepper. But other things? Bring on the generics. There will always be a place for premium products because in some cases, they're just a better buy. My car is a little more expensive (although hardly luxury) but it has a significantly lower cost of ownership than others that may have a cheaper payment.

    Convince me that it's worth it to buy the more expensive brand and I'll cut in other areas to do it. But that usually occurs in only certain categories. Most foods are never going to be better in the name brand. Cars and liquor are.

    • Interesting perspective. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Reid Adair

    My first time visiting “Social Media Explorer” after clicking on your Twitter link.

    OK, you can probably guess I know little or nothing about “social media,” but I think the economy has made folks make choices that they didn't make before. Maybe their Starbucks coffee is important to them, so they cut back on something else. Maybe their Coke Zero is important … or their Grey Goose … or their dinners at Ruth's Chris.

    So, as far as the “premium” brands, I think they'll suffer some … but there will be folks who will stay committed to them and made their changes in other areas.

    I've seen that with folks around here. I hate to call it a change in “priorities,” but maybe that's what it is?

  • Reid Adair

    My first time visiting “Social Media Explorer” after clicking on your Twitter link.

    OK, you can probably guess I know little or nothing about “social media,” but I think the economy has made folks make choices that they didn't make before. Maybe their Starbucks coffee is important to them, so they cut back on something else. Maybe their Coke Zero is important … or their Grey Goose … or their dinners at Ruth's Chris.

    So, as far as the “premium” brands, I think they'll suffer some … but there will be folks who will stay committed to them and made their changes in other areas.

    I've seen that with folks around here. I hate to call it a change in “priorities,” but maybe that's what it is?

  • Reid Adair

    My first time visiting “Social Media Explorer” after clicking on your Twitter link.

    OK, you can probably guess I know little or nothing about “social media,” but I think the economy has made folks make choices that they didn't make before. Maybe their Starbucks coffee is important to them, so they cut back on something else. Maybe their Coke Zero is important … or their Grey Goose … or their dinners at Ruth's Chris.

    So, as far as the “premium” brands, I think they'll suffer some … but there will be folks who will stay committed to them and made their changes in other areas.

    I've seen that with folks around here. I hate to call it a change in “priorities,” but maybe that's what it is?

  • Reid Adair

    My first time visiting “Social Media Explorer” after clicking on your Twitter link.

    OK, you can probably guess I know little or nothing about “social media,” but I think the economy has made folks make choices that they didn't make before. Maybe their Starbucks coffee is important to them, so they cut back on something else. Maybe their Coke Zero is important … or their Grey Goose … or their dinners at Ruth's Chris.

    So, as far as the “premium” brands, I think they'll suffer some … but there will be folks who will stay committed to them and made their changes in other areas.

    I've seen that with folks around here. I hate to call it a change in “priorities,” but maybe that's what it is?

  • Reid Adair

    My first time visiting “Social Media Explorer” after clicking on your Twitter link.

    OK, you can probably guess I know little or nothing about “social media,” but I think the economy has made folks make choices that they didn't make before. Maybe their Starbucks coffee is important to them, so they cut back on something else. Maybe their Coke Zero is important … or their Grey Goose … or their dinners at Ruth's Chris.

    So, as far as the “premium” brands, I think they'll suffer some … but there will be folks who will stay committed to them and made their changes in other areas.

    I've seen that with folks around here. I hate to call it a change in “priorities,” but maybe that's what it is?

  • Reid Adair

    My first time visiting “Social Media Explorer” after clicking on your Twitter link.

    OK, you can probably guess I know little or nothing about “social media,” but I think the economy has made folks make choices that they didn't make before. Maybe their Starbucks coffee is important to them, so they cut back on something else. Maybe their Coke Zero is important … or their Grey Goose … or their dinners at Ruth's Chris.

    So, as far as the “premium” brands, I think they'll suffer some … but there will be folks who will stay committed to them and made their changes in other areas.

    I've seen that with folks around here. I hate to call it a change in “priorities,” but maybe that's what it is?

  • Reid Adair

    My first time visiting “Social Media Explorer” after clicking on your Twitter link.

    OK, you can probably guess I know little or nothing about “social media,” but I think the economy has made folks make choices that they didn't make before. Maybe their Starbucks coffee is important to them, so they cut back on something else. Maybe their Coke Zero is important … or their Grey Goose … or their dinners at Ruth's Chris.

    So, as far as the “premium” brands, I think they'll suffer some … but there will be folks who will stay committed to them and made their changes in other areas.

    I've seen that with folks around here. I hate to call it a change in “priorities,” but maybe that's what it is?

  • Reid Adair

    My first time visiting “Social Media Explorer” after clicking on your Twitter link.

    OK, you can probably guess I know little or nothing about “social media,” but I think the economy has made folks make choices that they didn't make before. Maybe their Starbucks coffee is important to them, so they cut back on something else. Maybe their Coke Zero is important … or their Grey Goose … or their dinners at Ruth's Chris.

    So, as far as the “premium” brands, I think they'll suffer some … but there will be folks who will stay committed to them and made their changes in other areas.

    I've seen that with folks around here. I hate to call it a change in “priorities,” but maybe that's what it is?

  • Reid Adair

    My first time visiting “Social Media Explorer” after clicking on your Twitter link.

    OK, you can probably guess I know little or nothing about “social media,” but I think the economy has made folks make choices that they didn't make before. Maybe their Starbucks coffee is important to them, so they cut back on something else. Maybe their Coke Zero is important … or their Grey Goose … or their dinners at Ruth's Chris.

    So, as far as the “premium” brands, I think they'll suffer some … but there will be folks who will stay committed to them and made their changes in other areas.

    I've seen that with folks around here. I hate to call it a change in “priorities,” but maybe that's what it is?

  • Reid Adair

    My first time visiting “Social Media Explorer” after clicking on your Twitter link.

    OK, you can probably guess I know little or nothing about “social media,” but I think the economy has made folks make choices that they didn't make before. Maybe their Starbucks coffee is important to them, so they cut back on something else. Maybe their Coke Zero is important … or their Grey Goose … or their dinners at Ruth's Chris.

    So, as far as the “premium” brands, I think they'll suffer some … but there will be folks who will stay committed to them and made their changes in other areas.

    I've seen that with folks around here. I hate to call it a change in “priorities,” but maybe that's what it is?

  • Reid Adair

    My first time visiting “Social Media Explorer” after clicking on your Twitter link.

    OK, you can probably guess I know little or nothing about “social media,” but I think the economy has made folks make choices that they didn't make before. Maybe their Starbucks coffee is important to them, so they cut back on something else. Maybe their Coke Zero is important … or their Grey Goose … or their dinners at Ruth's Chris.

    So, as far as the “premium” brands, I think they'll suffer some … but there will be folks who will stay committed to them and made their changes in other areas.

    I've seen that with folks around here. I hate to call it a change in “priorities,” but maybe that's what it is?

  • Reid Adair

    My first time visiting “Social Media Explorer” after clicking on your Twitter link.

    OK, you can probably guess I know little or nothing about “social media,” but I think the economy has made folks make choices that they didn't make before. Maybe their Starbucks coffee is important to them, so they cut back on something else. Maybe their Coke Zero is important … or their Grey Goose … or their dinners at Ruth's Chris.

    So, as far as the “premium” brands, I think they'll suffer some … but there will be folks who will stay committed to them and made their changes in other areas.

    I've seen that with folks around here. I hate to call it a change in “priorities,” but maybe that's what it is?

  • Reid Adair

    My first time visiting “Social Media Explorer” after clicking on your Twitter link.

    OK, you can probably guess I know little or nothing about “social media,” but I think the economy has made folks make choices that they didn't make before. Maybe their Starbucks coffee is important to them, so they cut back on something else. Maybe their Coke Zero is important … or their Grey Goose … or their dinners at Ruth's Chris.

    So, as far as the “premium” brands, I think they'll suffer some … but there will be folks who will stay committed to them and made their changes in other areas.

    I've seen that with folks around here. I hate to call it a change in “priorities,” but maybe that's what it is?

    • Thanks for hittin' the SME, Reid. I tend to think you're probably right. But I can certainly see a trend away from spend which can hurt a lot of folks. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Well done, sir. Thank you for the input and honest assessment. I'm sure my spirits industry friends will take fair note of your comment. And, frankly, I love the focus on value rather than flash piece. Very good insight. Thanks for sharing. (And for sharing the link to the MetLife thing.)

  • Well done, sir. Thank you for the input and honest assessment. I'm sure my spirits industry friends will take fair note of your comment. And, frankly, I love the focus on value rather than flash piece. Very good insight. Thanks for sharing. (And for sharing the link to the MetLife thing.)

  • Well done, sir. Thank you for the input and honest assessment. I'm sure my spirits industry friends will take fair note of your comment. And, frankly, I love the focus on value rather than flash piece. Very good insight. Thanks for sharing. (And for sharing the link to the MetLife thing.)

  • Well done, sir. Thank you for the input and honest assessment. I'm sure my spirits industry friends will take fair note of your comment. And, frankly, I love the focus on value rather than flash piece. Very good insight. Thanks for sharing. (And for sharing the link to the MetLife thing.)

  • Well done, sir. Thank you for the input and honest assessment. I'm sure my spirits industry friends will take fair note of your comment. And, frankly, I love the focus on value rather than flash piece. Very good insight. Thanks for sharing. (And for sharing the link to the MetLife thing.)

  • Well done, sir. Thank you for the input and honest assessment. I'm sure my spirits industry friends will take fair note of your comment. And, frankly, I love the focus on value rather than flash piece. Very good insight. Thanks for sharing. (And for sharing the link to the MetLife thing.)

  • Well done, sir. Thank you for the input and honest assessment. I'm sure my spirits industry friends will take fair note of your comment. And, frankly, I love the focus on value rather than flash piece. Very good insight. Thanks for sharing. (And for sharing the link to the MetLife thing.)

  • Well done, sir. Thank you for the input and honest assessment. I'm sure my spirits industry friends will take fair note of your comment. And, frankly, I love the focus on value rather than flash piece. Very good insight. Thanks for sharing. (And for sharing the link to the MetLife thing.)

  • Well done, sir. Thank you for the input and honest assessment. I'm sure my spirits industry friends will take fair note of your comment. And, frankly, I love the focus on value rather than flash piece. Very good insight. Thanks for sharing. (And for sharing the link to the MetLife thing.)

  • Well done, sir. Thank you for the input and honest assessment. I'm sure my spirits industry friends will take fair note of your comment. And, frankly, I love the focus on value rather than flash piece. Very good insight. Thanks for sharing. (And for sharing the link to the MetLife thing.)

  • Well done, sir. Thank you for the input and honest assessment. I'm sure my spirits industry friends will take fair note of your comment. And, frankly, I love the focus on value rather than flash piece. Very good insight. Thanks for sharing. (And for sharing the link to the MetLife thing.)

  • Well done, sir. Thank you for the input and honest assessment. I'm sure my spirits industry friends will take fair note of your comment. And, frankly, I love the focus on value rather than flash piece. Very good insight. Thanks for sharing. (And for sharing the link to the MetLife thing.)

  • RT @JasonFalls: Want your thoughts. Will the economy change our buying habits? (Are premium brands at risk?) http://twurl.nl/aiu6ad

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Great response, Heather. And spot on what I was hoping to hear. What you've said is that yes, some premium brands may suffer. Others won't. It's the “it seems worth it” that marketers need to A) Hope for and B) Create in their consumers. Bravo.

    Hope the dogs don't hold a grudge. Heh.

  • Great response, Heather. And spot on what I was hoping to hear. What you've said is that yes, some premium brands may suffer. Others won't. It's the “it seems worth it” that marketers need to A) Hope for and B) Create in their consumers. Bravo.

    Hope the dogs don't hold a grudge. Heh.

  • Great response, Heather. And spot on what I was hoping to hear. What you've said is that yes, some premium brands may suffer. Others won't. It's the “it seems worth it” that marketers need to A) Hope for and B) Create in their consumers. Bravo.

    Hope the dogs don't hold a grudge. Heh.

  • Great response, Heather. And spot on what I was hoping to hear. What you've said is that yes, some premium brands may suffer. Others won't. It's the “it seems worth it” that marketers need to A) Hope for and B) Create in their consumers. Bravo.

    Hope the dogs don't hold a grudge. Heh.

  • Great response, Heather. And spot on what I was hoping to hear. What you've said is that yes, some premium brands may suffer. Others won't. It's the “it seems worth it” that marketers need to A) Hope for and B) Create in their consumers. Bravo.

    Hope the dogs don't hold a grudge. Heh.

  • Great response, Heather. And spot on what I was hoping to hear. What you've said is that yes, some premium brands may suffer. Others won't. It's the “it seems worth it” that marketers need to A) Hope for and B) Create in their consumers. Bravo.

    Hope the dogs don't hold a grudge. Heh.

  • Great response, Heather. And spot on what I was hoping to hear. What you've said is that yes, some premium brands may suffer. Others won't. It's the “it seems worth it” that marketers need to A) Hope for and B) Create in their consumers. Bravo.

    Hope the dogs don't hold a grudge. Heh.

  • Great response, Heather. And spot on what I was hoping to hear. What you've said is that yes, some premium brands may suffer. Others won't. It's the “it seems worth it” that marketers need to A) Hope for and B) Create in their consumers. Bravo.

    Hope the dogs don't hold a grudge. Heh.

  • Great response, Heather. And spot on what I was hoping to hear. What you've said is that yes, some premium brands may suffer. Others won't. It's the “it seems worth it” that marketers need to A) Hope for and B) Create in their consumers. Bravo.

    Hope the dogs don't hold a grudge. Heh.

  • Great response, Heather. And spot on what I was hoping to hear. What you've said is that yes, some premium brands may suffer. Others won't. It's the “it seems worth it” that marketers need to A) Hope for and B) Create in their consumers. Bravo.

    Hope the dogs don't hold a grudge. Heh.

  • Great response, Heather. And spot on what I was hoping to hear. What you've said is that yes, some premium brands may suffer. Others won't. It's the “it seems worth it” that marketers need to A) Hope for and B) Create in their consumers. Bravo.

    Hope the dogs don't hold a grudge. Heh.

  • Great response, Heather. And spot on what I was hoping to hear. What you've said is that yes, some premium brands may suffer. Others won't. It's the “it seems worth it” that marketers need to A) Hope for and B) Create in their consumers. Bravo.

    Hope the dogs don't hold a grudge. Heh.

  • Amen to that, Brother Nick. And I would say that premium brands are, for the most part, must haves in the minds of their owners. But still, would a long period of economic unrest lead people to rethink even the must haves in their lives? It just might.

  • Amen to that, Brother Nick. And I would say that premium brands are, for the most part, must haves in the minds of their owners. But still, would a long period of economic unrest lead people to rethink even the must haves in their lives? It just might.

  • Amen to that, Brother Nick. And I would say that premium brands are, for the most part, must haves in the minds of their owners. But still, would a long period of economic unrest lead people to rethink even the must haves in their lives? It just might.

  • Amen to that, Brother Nick. And I would say that premium brands are, for the most part, must haves in the minds of their owners. But still, would a long period of economic unrest lead people to rethink even the must haves in their lives? It just might.

  • Amen to that, Brother Nick. And I would say that premium brands are, for the most part, must haves in the minds of their owners. But still, would a long period of economic unrest lead people to rethink even the must haves in their lives? It just might.

  • Amen to that, Brother Nick. And I would say that premium brands are, for the most part, must haves in the minds of their owners. But still, would a long period of economic unrest lead people to rethink even the must haves in their lives? It just might.

  • Amen to that, Brother Nick. And I would say that premium brands are, for the most part, must haves in the minds of their owners. But still, would a long period of economic unrest lead people to rethink even the must haves in their lives? It just might.

  • Amen to that, Brother Nick. And I would say that premium brands are, for the most part, must haves in the minds of their owners. But still, would a long period of economic unrest lead people to rethink even the must haves in their lives? It just might.

  • Amen to that, Brother Nick. And I would say that premium brands are, for the most part, must haves in the minds of their owners. But still, would a long period of economic unrest lead people to rethink even the must haves in their lives? It just might.

  • Amen to that, Brother Nick. And I would say that premium brands are, for the most part, must haves in the minds of their owners. But still, would a long period of economic unrest lead people to rethink even the must haves in their lives? It just might.

  • Amen to that, Brother Nick. And I would say that premium brands are, for the most part, must haves in the minds of their owners. But still, would a long period of economic unrest lead people to rethink even the must haves in their lives? It just might.

  • Amen to that, Brother Nick. And I would say that premium brands are, for the most part, must haves in the minds of their owners. But still, would a long period of economic unrest lead people to rethink even the must haves in their lives? It just might.

  • Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? http://tinyurl.com/czgw2r from: @JasonFalls

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • MetLife just completed a sweeping study of how the “American Dream” has changed in all this, available here: http://www.metlife.com/dream

    Bottom line is people value thrift over luxury, in a way we haven't seen in a couple generations. Conspicuous consumption has become conspicuously un-attractive. Less is the new more. I think it's a change that, if not permanent, is going to define the next business cycle.

    As for what it means for brands… as you say, it depends on the brand. It seems that in general… the high end folks need to focus on value rather than flash (many BMW's end up holding their own on a total cost-of-ownership basis), the low end folks need to make hay while the sun shines (GAP, Betty Crocker and Levi's should increase their ad budgets NOW), and the mid-market folks need to pick a side and stick with it.

    Translating into Kentucky… Jim Beam is good stuff. Maker's is even better, IMHO. It feels a little foolish to serve up all that small batch stuff right now, and THAT is going to be the case for a while.

  • MetLife just completed a sweeping study of how the “American Dream” has changed in all this, available here: http://www.metlife.com/dream

    Bottom line is people value thrift over luxury, in a way we haven't seen in a couple generations. Conspicuous consumption has become conspicuously un-attractive. Less is the new more. I think it's a change that, if not permanent, is going to define the next business cycle.

    As for what it means for brands… as you say, it depends on the brand. It seems that in general… the high end folks need to focus on value rather than flash (many BMW's end up holding their own on a total cost-of-ownership basis), the low end folks need to make hay while the sun shines (GAP, Betty Crocker and Levi's should increase their ad budgets NOW), and the mid-market folks need to pick a side and stick with it.

    Translating into Kentucky… Jim Beam is good stuff. Maker's is even better, IMHO. It feels a little foolish to serve up all that small batch stuff right now, and THAT is going to be the case for a while.

  • MetLife just completed a sweeping study of how the “American Dream” has changed in all this, available here: http://www.metlife.com/dream

    Bottom line is people value thrift over luxury, in a way we haven't seen in a couple generations. Conspicuous consumption has become conspicuously un-attractive. Less is the new more. I think it's a change that, if not permanent, is going to define the next business cycle.

    As for what it means for brands… as you say, it depends on the brand. It seems that in general… the high end folks need to focus on value rather than flash (many BMW's end up holding their own on a total cost-of-ownership basis), the low end folks need to make hay while the sun shines (GAP, Betty Crocker and Levi's should increase their ad budgets NOW), and the mid-market folks need to pick a side and stick with it.

    Translating into Kentucky… Jim Beam is good stuff. Maker's is even better, IMHO. It feels a little foolish to serve up all that small batch stuff right now, and THAT is going to be the case for a while.

  • MetLife just completed a sweeping study of how the “American Dream” has changed in all this, available here: http://www.metlife.com/dream

    Bottom line is people value thrift over luxury, in a way we haven't seen in a couple generations. Conspicuous consumption has become conspicuously un-attractive. Less is the new more. I think it's a change that, if not permanent, is going to define the next business cycle.

    As for what it means for brands… as you say, it depends on the brand. It seems that in general… the high end folks need to focus on value rather than flash (many BMW's end up holding their own on a total cost-of-ownership basis), the low end folks need to make hay while the sun shines (GAP, Betty Crocker and Levi's should increase their ad budgets NOW), and the mid-market folks need to pick a side and stick with it.

    Translating into Kentucky… Jim Beam is good stuff. Maker's is even better, IMHO. It feels a little foolish to serve up all that small batch stuff right now, and THAT is going to be the case for a while.

  • MetLife just completed a sweeping study of how the “American Dream” has changed in all this, available here: http://www.metlife.com/dream

    Bottom line is people value thrift over luxury, in a way we haven't seen in a couple generations. Conspicuous consumption has become conspicuously un-attractive. Less is the new more. I think it's a change that, if not permanent, is going to define the next business cycle.

    As for what it means for brands… as you say, it depends on the brand. It seems that in general… the high end folks need to focus on value rather than flash (many BMW's end up holding their own on a total cost-of-ownership basis), the low end folks need to make hay while the sun shines (GAP, Betty Crocker and Levi's should increase their ad budgets NOW), and the mid-market folks need to pick a side and stick with it.

    Translating into Kentucky… Jim Beam is good stuff. Maker's is even better, IMHO. It feels a little foolish to serve up all that small batch stuff right now, and THAT is going to be the case for a while.

  • MetLife just completed a sweeping study of how the “American Dream” has changed in all this, available here: http://www.metlife.com/dream

    Bottom line is people value thrift over luxury, in a way we haven't seen in a couple generations. Conspicuous consumption has become conspicuously un-attractive. Less is the new more. I think it's a change that, if not permanent, is going to define the next business cycle.

    As for what it means for brands… as you say, it depends on the brand. It seems that in general… the high end folks need to focus on value rather than flash (many BMW's end up holding their own on a total cost-of-ownership basis), the low end folks need to make hay while the sun shines (GAP, Betty Crocker and Levi's should increase their ad budgets NOW), and the mid-market folks need to pick a side and stick with it.

    Translating into Kentucky… Jim Beam is good stuff. Maker's is even better, IMHO. It feels a little foolish to serve up all that small batch stuff right now, and THAT is going to be the case for a while.

  • MetLife just completed a sweeping study of how the “American Dream” has changed in all this, available here: http://www.metlife.com/dream

    Bottom line is people value thrift over luxury, in a way we haven't seen in a couple generations. Conspicuous consumption has become conspicuously un-attractive. Less is the new more. I think it's a change that, if not permanent, is going to define the next business cycle.

    As for what it means for brands… as you say, it depends on the brand. It seems that in general… the high end folks need to focus on value rather than flash (many BMW's end up holding their own on a total cost-of-ownership basis), the low end folks need to make hay while the sun shines (GAP, Betty Crocker and Levi's should increase their ad budgets NOW), and the mid-market folks need to pick a side and stick with it.

    Translating into Kentucky… Jim Beam is good stuff. Maker's is even better, IMHO. It feels a little foolish to serve up all that small batch stuff right now, and THAT is going to be the case for a while.

  • MetLife just completed a sweeping study of how the “American Dream” has changed in all this, available here: http://www.metlife.com/dream

    Bottom line is people value thrift over luxury, in a way we haven't seen in a couple generations. Conspicuous consumption has become conspicuously un-attractive. Less is the new more. I think it's a change that, if not permanent, is going to define the next business cycle.

    As for what it means for brands… as you say, it depends on the brand. It seems that in general… the high end folks need to focus on value rather than flash (many BMW's end up holding their own on a total cost-of-ownership basis), the low end folks need to make hay while the sun shines (GAP, Betty Crocker and Levi's should increase their ad budgets NOW), and the mid-market folks need to pick a side and stick with it.

    Translating into Kentucky… Jim Beam is good stuff. Maker's is even better, IMHO. It feels a little foolish to serve up all that small batch stuff right now, and THAT is going to be the case for a while.

  • MetLife just completed a sweeping study of how the “American Dream” has changed in all this, available here: http://www.metlife.com/dream

    Bottom line is people value thrift over luxury, in a way we haven't seen in a couple generations. Conspicuous consumption has become conspicuously un-attractive. Less is the new more. I think it's a change that, if not permanent, is going to define the next business cycle.

    As for what it means for brands… as you say, it depends on the brand. It seems that in general… the high end folks need to focus on value rather than flash (many BMW's end up holding their own on a total cost-of-ownership basis), the low end folks need to make hay while the sun shines (GAP, Betty Crocker and Levi's should increase their ad budgets NOW), and the mid-market folks need to pick a side and stick with it.

    Translating into Kentucky… Jim Beam is good stuff. Maker's is even better, IMHO. It feels a little foolish to serve up all that small batch stuff right now, and THAT is going to be the case for a while.

  • MetLife just completed a sweeping study of how the “American Dream” has changed in all this, available here: http://www.metlife.com/dream

    Bottom line is people value thrift over luxury, in a way we haven't seen in a couple generations. Conspicuous consumption has become conspicuously un-attractive. Less is the new more. I think it's a change that, if not permanent, is going to define the next business cycle.

    As for what it means for brands… as you say, it depends on the brand. It seems that in general… the high end folks need to focus on value rather than flash (many BMW's end up holding their own on a total cost-of-ownership basis), the low end folks need to make hay while the sun shines (GAP, Betty Crocker and Levi's should increase their ad budgets NOW), and the mid-market folks need to pick a side and stick with it.

    Translating into Kentucky… Jim Beam is good stuff. Maker's is even better, IMHO. It feels a little foolish to serve up all that small batch stuff right now, and THAT is going to be the case for a while.

  • MetLife just completed a sweeping study of how the “American Dream” has changed in all this, available here: http://www.metlife.com/dream

    Bottom line is people value thrift over luxury, in a way we haven't seen in a couple generations. Conspicuous consumption has become conspicuously un-attractive. Less is the new more. I think it's a change that, if not permanent, is going to define the next business cycle.

    As for what it means for brands… as you say, it depends on the brand. It seems that in general… the high end folks need to focus on value rather than flash (many BMW's end up holding their own on a total cost-of-ownership basis), the low end folks need to make hay while the sun shines (GAP, Betty Crocker and Levi's should increase their ad budgets NOW), and the mid-market folks need to pick a side and stick with it.

    Translating into Kentucky… Jim Beam is good stuff. Maker's is even better, IMHO. It feels a little foolish to serve up all that small batch stuff right now, and THAT is going to be the case for a while.

  • MetLife just completed a sweeping study of how the “American Dream” has changed in all this, available here: http://www.metlife.com/dream

    Bottom line is people value thrift over luxury, in a way we haven't seen in a couple generations. Conspicuous consumption has become conspicuously un-attractive. Less is the new more. I think it's a change that, if not permanent, is going to define the next business cycle.

    As for what it means for brands… as you say, it depends on the brand. It seems that in general… the high end folks need to focus on value rather than flash (many BMW's end up holding their own on a total cost-of-ownership basis), the low end folks need to make hay while the sun shines (GAP, Betty Crocker and Levi's should increase their ad budgets NOW), and the mid-market folks need to pick a side and stick with it.

    Translating into Kentucky… Jim Beam is good stuff. Maker's is even better, IMHO. It feels a little foolish to serve up all that small batch stuff right now, and THAT is going to be the case for a while.

  • MetLife just completed a sweeping study of how the “American Dream” has changed in all this, available here: http://www.metlife.com/dream

    Bottom line is people value thrift over luxury, in a way we haven't seen in a couple generations. Conspicuous consumption has become conspicuously un-attractive. Less is the new more. I think it's a change that, if not permanent, is going to define the next business cycle.

    As for what it means for brands… as you say, it depends on the brand. It seems that in general… the high end folks need to focus on value rather than flash (many BMW's end up holding their own on a total cost-of-ownership basis), the low end folks need to make hay while the sun shines (GAP, Betty Crocker and Levi's should increase their ad budgets NOW), and the mid-market folks need to pick a side and stick with it.

    Translating into Kentucky… Jim Beam is good stuff. Maker's is even better, IMHO. It feels a little foolish to serve up all that small batch stuff right now, and THAT is going to be the case for a while.

    • Well done, sir. Thank you for the input and honest assessment. I'm sure my spirits industry friends will take fair note of your comment. And, frankly, I love the focus on value rather than flash piece. Very good insight. Thanks for sharing. (And for sharing the link to the MetLife thing.)

  • Fair points, Cuz. (For the readers, she is my cousin.) I would only push back a bit to say that premiums at a discount are no longer premiums. That's part of the appeal – they are more expensive because they should be. Sure, there are some brands that shouldn't be but are, but in general you pay more to get better quality stuff. Unless the cheap crap is going to also cut their prices, the premiums can't go down, or at least not down much.

    And I wouldn't say premium brands gouge people. That's the lefty, socialist, power to the people streak coming out in you. Heh. If I make a good product that's fairly priced against competitors, it's not gouging. Especially if someone will pay that price. Just ask your Vodka company.

    Thanks for commenting on my blog, yo. It's much more friendly than the last comment you left on a blog of mine. (For the readers – She blistered my butt on an old personal blog once. It was quite amusing in retrospect. Heh.)

  • Fair points, Cuz. (For the readers, she is my cousin.) I would only push back a bit to say that premiums at a discount are no longer premiums. That's part of the appeal – they are more expensive because they should be. Sure, there are some brands that shouldn't be but are, but in general you pay more to get better quality stuff. Unless the cheap crap is going to also cut their prices, the premiums can't go down, or at least not down much.

    And I wouldn't say premium brands gouge people. That's the lefty, socialist, power to the people streak coming out in you. Heh. If I make a good product that's fairly priced against competitors, it's not gouging. Especially if someone will pay that price. Just ask your Vodka company.

    Thanks for commenting on my blog, yo. It's much more friendly than the last comment you left on a blog of mine. (For the readers – She blistered my butt on an old personal blog once. It was quite amusing in retrospect. Heh.)

  • Fair points, Cuz. (For the readers, she is my cousin.) I would only push back a bit to say that premiums at a discount are no longer premiums. That's part of the appeal – they are more expensive because they should be. Sure, there are some brands that shouldn't be but are, but in general you pay more to get better quality stuff. Unless the cheap crap is going to also cut their prices, the premiums can't go down, or at least not down much.

    And I wouldn't say premium brands gouge people. That's the lefty, socialist, power to the people streak coming out in you. Heh. If I make a good product that's fairly priced against competitors, it's not gouging. Especially if someone will pay that price. Just ask your Vodka company.

    Thanks for commenting on my blog, yo. It's much more friendly than the last comment you left on a blog of mine. (For the readers – She blistered my butt on an old personal blog once. It was quite amusing in retrospect. Heh.)

  • Fair points, Cuz. (For the readers, she is my cousin.) I would only push back a bit to say that premiums at a discount are no longer premiums. That's part of the appeal – they are more expensive because they should be. Sure, there are some brands that shouldn't be but are, but in general you pay more to get better quality stuff. Unless the cheap crap is going to also cut their prices, the premiums can't go down, or at least not down much.

    And I wouldn't say premium brands gouge people. That's the lefty, socialist, power to the people streak coming out in you. Heh. If I make a good product that's fairly priced against competitors, it's not gouging. Especially if someone will pay that price. Just ask your Vodka company.

    Thanks for commenting on my blog, yo. It's much more friendly than the last comment you left on a blog of mine. (For the readers – She blistered my butt on an old personal blog once. It was quite amusing in retrospect. Heh.)

  • Fair points, Cuz. (For the readers, she is my cousin.) I would only push back a bit to say that premiums at a discount are no longer premiums. That's part of the appeal – they are more expensive because they should be. Sure, there are some brands that shouldn't be but are, but in general you pay more to get better quality stuff. Unless the cheap crap is going to also cut their prices, the premiums can't go down, or at least not down much.

    And I wouldn't say premium brands gouge people. That's the lefty, socialist, power to the people streak coming out in you. Heh. If I make a good product that's fairly priced against competitors, it's not gouging. Especially if someone will pay that price. Just ask your Vodka company.

    Thanks for commenting on my blog, yo. It's much more friendly than the last comment you left on a blog of mine. (For the readers – She blistered my butt on an old personal blog once. It was quite amusing in retrospect. Heh.)

  • Fair points, Cuz. (For the readers, she is my cousin.) I would only push back a bit to say that premiums at a discount are no longer premiums. That's part of the appeal – they are more expensive because they should be. Sure, there are some brands that shouldn't be but are, but in general you pay more to get better quality stuff. Unless the cheap crap is going to also cut their prices, the premiums can't go down, or at least not down much.

    And I wouldn't say premium brands gouge people. That's the lefty, socialist, power to the people streak coming out in you. Heh. If I make a good product that's fairly priced against competitors, it's not gouging. Especially if someone will pay that price. Just ask your Vodka company.

    Thanks for commenting on my blog, yo. It's much more friendly than the last comment you left on a blog of mine. (For the readers – She blistered my butt on an old personal blog once. It was quite amusing in retrospect. Heh.)

  • Fair points, Cuz. (For the readers, she is my cousin.) I would only push back a bit to say that premiums at a discount are no longer premiums. That's part of the appeal – they are more expensive because they should be. Sure, there are some brands that shouldn't be but are, but in general you pay more to get better quality stuff. Unless the cheap crap is going to also cut their prices, the premiums can't go down, or at least not down much.

    And I wouldn't say premium brands gouge people. That's the lefty, socialist, power to the people streak coming out in you. Heh. If I make a good product that's fairly priced against competitors, it's not gouging. Especially if someone will pay that price. Just ask your Vodka company.

    Thanks for commenting on my blog, yo. It's much more friendly than the last comment you left on a blog of mine. (For the readers – She blistered my butt on an old personal blog once. It was quite amusing in retrospect. Heh.)

  • Fair points, Cuz. (For the readers, she is my cousin.) I would only push back a bit to say that premiums at a discount are no longer premiums. That's part of the appeal – they are more expensive because they should be. Sure, there are some brands that shouldn't be but are, but in general you pay more to get better quality stuff. Unless the cheap crap is going to also cut their prices, the premiums can't go down, or at least not down much.

    And I wouldn't say premium brands gouge people. That's the lefty, socialist, power to the people streak coming out in you. Heh. If I make a good product that's fairly priced against competitors, it's not gouging. Especially if someone will pay that price. Just ask your Vodka company.

    Thanks for commenting on my blog, yo. It's much more friendly than the last comment you left on a blog of mine. (For the readers – She blistered my butt on an old personal blog once. It was quite amusing in retrospect. Heh.)

  • Fair points, Cuz. (For the readers, she is my cousin.) I would only push back a bit to say that premiums at a discount are no longer premiums. That's part of the appeal – they are more expensive because they should be. Sure, there are some brands that shouldn't be but are, but in general you pay more to get better quality stuff. Unless the cheap crap is going to also cut their prices, the premiums can't go down, or at least not down much.

    And I wouldn't say premium brands gouge people. That's the lefty, socialist, power to the people streak coming out in you. Heh. If I make a good product that's fairly priced against competitors, it's not gouging. Especially if someone will pay that price. Just ask your Vodka company.

    Thanks for commenting on my blog, yo. It's much more friendly than the last comment you left on a blog of mine. (For the readers – She blistered my butt on an old personal blog once. It was quite amusing in retrospect. Heh.)

  • Fair points, Cuz. (For the readers, she is my cousin.) I would only push back a bit to say that premiums at a discount are no longer premiums. That's part of the appeal – they are more expensive because they should be. Sure, there are some brands that shouldn't be but are, but in general you pay more to get better quality stuff. Unless the cheap crap is going to also cut their prices, the premiums can't go down, or at least not down much.

    And I wouldn't say premium brands gouge people. That's the lefty, socialist, power to the people streak coming out in you. Heh. If I make a good product that's fairly priced against competitors, it's not gouging. Especially if someone will pay that price. Just ask your Vodka company.

    Thanks for commenting on my blog, yo. It's much more friendly than the last comment you left on a blog of mine. (For the readers – She blistered my butt on an old personal blog once. It was quite amusing in retrospect. Heh.)

  • Fair points, Cuz. (For the readers, she is my cousin.) I would only push back a bit to say that premiums at a discount are no longer premiums. That's part of the appeal – they are more expensive because they should be. Sure, there are some brands that shouldn't be but are, but in general you pay more to get better quality stuff. Unless the cheap crap is going to also cut their prices, the premiums can't go down, or at least not down much.

    And I wouldn't say premium brands gouge people. That's the lefty, socialist, power to the people streak coming out in you. Heh. If I make a good product that's fairly priced against competitors, it's not gouging. Especially if someone will pay that price. Just ask your Vodka company.

    Thanks for commenting on my blog, yo. It's much more friendly than the last comment you left on a blog of mine. (For the readers – She blistered my butt on an old personal blog once. It was quite amusing in retrospect. Heh.)

  • Fair points, Cuz. (For the readers, she is my cousin.) I would only push back a bit to say that premiums at a discount are no longer premiums. That's part of the appeal – they are more expensive because they should be. Sure, there are some brands that shouldn't be but are, but in general you pay more to get better quality stuff. Unless the cheap crap is going to also cut their prices, the premiums can't go down, or at least not down much.

    And I wouldn't say premium brands gouge people. That's the lefty, socialist, power to the people streak coming out in you. Heh. If I make a good product that's fairly priced against competitors, it's not gouging. Especially if someone will pay that price. Just ask your Vodka company.

    Thanks for commenting on my blog, yo. It's much more friendly than the last comment you left on a blog of mine. (For the readers – She blistered my butt on an old personal blog once. It was quite amusing in retrospect. Heh.)

  • Yeah, that might be the best comment of the year.

  • Yeah, that might be the best comment of the year.

  • Yeah, that might be the best comment of the year.

  • Yeah, that might be the best comment of the year.

  • Yeah, that might be the best comment of the year.

  • Yeah, that might be the best comment of the year.

  • Yeah, that might be the best comment of the year.

  • Yeah, that might be the best comment of the year.

  • Yeah, that might be the best comment of the year.

  • Yeah, that might be the best comment of the year.

  • Yeah, that might be the best comment of the year.

  • Yeah, that might be the best comment of the year.

  • Want your thoughts at SME today – Will the economy change our buying habits? (Are premium brands at risk?) http://twurl.nl/aiu6ad

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Heather

    I do think that we will re-learn to spend and marketers will need to adjust accordingly. For example, about a year ago my dogs got the best food, treats, care from the chain pet store. My husband lost his job and we had to cut. I just added dog food to the 'ol Wal Mart list and saved about 60 bucks a month. My husband found a job and we are back on our feet. We have found that the dogs lived and decided to start saving the money we save each month “just in case.” However there were premium products we did not scale back on like liquor, diapers, detergent, soap – only because we felt they were worth the money. Bottom line, if it seems worth it, we will find a way to get it but are more sensible about our spending habits.

  • Heather

    I do think that we will re-learn to spend and marketers will need to adjust accordingly. For example, about a year ago my dogs got the best food, treats, care from the chain pet store. My husband lost his job and we had to cut. I just added dog food to the 'ol Wal Mart list and saved about 60 bucks a month. My husband found a job and we are back on our feet. We have found that the dogs lived and decided to start saving the money we save each month “just in case.” However there were premium products we did not scale back on like liquor, diapers, detergent, soap – only because we felt they were worth the money. Bottom line, if it seems worth it, we will find a way to get it but are more sensible about our spending habits.

  • Heather

    I do think that we will re-learn to spend and marketers will need to adjust accordingly. For example, about a year ago my dogs got the best food, treats, care from the chain pet store. My husband lost his job and we had to cut. I just added dog food to the 'ol Wal Mart list and saved about 60 bucks a month. My husband found a job and we are back on our feet. We have found that the dogs lived and decided to start saving the money we save each month “just in case.” However there were premium products we did not scale back on like liquor, diapers, detergent, soap – only because we felt they were worth the money. Bottom line, if it seems worth it, we will find a way to get it but are more sensible about our spending habits.

  • Heather

    I do think that we will re-learn to spend and marketers will need to adjust accordingly. For example, about a year ago my dogs got the best food, treats, care from the chain pet store. My husband lost his job and we had to cut. I just added dog food to the 'ol Wal Mart list and saved about 60 bucks a month. My husband found a job and we are back on our feet. We have found that the dogs lived and decided to start saving the money we save each month “just in case.” However there were premium products we did not scale back on like liquor, diapers, detergent, soap – only because we felt they were worth the money. Bottom line, if it seems worth it, we will find a way to get it but are more sensible about our spending habits.

  • Heather

    I do think that we will re-learn to spend and marketers will need to adjust accordingly. For example, about a year ago my dogs got the best food, treats, care from the chain pet store. My husband lost his job and we had to cut. I just added dog food to the 'ol Wal Mart list and saved about 60 bucks a month. My husband found a job and we are back on our feet. We have found that the dogs lived and decided to start saving the money we save each month “just in case.” However there were premium products we did not scale back on like liquor, diapers, detergent, soap – only because we felt they were worth the money. Bottom line, if it seems worth it, we will find a way to get it but are more sensible about our spending habits.

  • Heather

    I do think that we will re-learn to spend and marketers will need to adjust accordingly. For example, about a year ago my dogs got the best food, treats, care from the chain pet store. My husband lost his job and we had to cut. I just added dog food to the 'ol Wal Mart list and saved about 60 bucks a month. My husband found a job and we are back on our feet. We have found that the dogs lived and decided to start saving the money we save each month “just in case.” However there were premium products we did not scale back on like liquor, diapers, detergent, soap – only because we felt they were worth the money. Bottom line, if it seems worth it, we will find a way to get it but are more sensible about our spending habits.

  • Heather

    I do think that we will re-learn to spend and marketers will need to adjust accordingly. For example, about a year ago my dogs got the best food, treats, care from the chain pet store. My husband lost his job and we had to cut. I just added dog food to the 'ol Wal Mart list and saved about 60 bucks a month. My husband found a job and we are back on our feet. We have found that the dogs lived and decided to start saving the money we save each month “just in case.” However there were premium products we did not scale back on like liquor, diapers, detergent, soap – only because we felt they were worth the money. Bottom line, if it seems worth it, we will find a way to get it but are more sensible about our spending habits.

  • Heather

    I do think that we will re-learn to spend and marketers will need to adjust accordingly. For example, about a year ago my dogs got the best food, treats, care from the chain pet store. My husband lost his job and we had to cut. I just added dog food to the 'ol Wal Mart list and saved about 60 bucks a month. My husband found a job and we are back on our feet. We have found that the dogs lived and decided to start saving the money we save each month “just in case.” However there were premium products we did not scale back on like liquor, diapers, detergent, soap – only because we felt they were worth the money. Bottom line, if it seems worth it, we will find a way to get it but are more sensible about our spending habits.

  • Heather

    I do think that we will re-learn to spend and marketers will need to adjust accordingly. For example, about a year ago my dogs got the best food, treats, care from the chain pet store. My husband lost his job and we had to cut. I just added dog food to the 'ol Wal Mart list and saved about 60 bucks a month. My husband found a job and we are back on our feet. We have found that the dogs lived and decided to start saving the money we save each month “just in case.” However there were premium products we did not scale back on like liquor, diapers, detergent, soap – only because we felt they were worth the money. Bottom line, if it seems worth it, we will find a way to get it but are more sensible about our spending habits.

  • Heather

    I do think that we will re-learn to spend and marketers will need to adjust accordingly. For example, about a year ago my dogs got the best food, treats, care from the chain pet store. My husband lost his job and we had to cut. I just added dog food to the 'ol Wal Mart list and saved about 60 bucks a month. My husband found a job and we are back on our feet. We have found that the dogs lived and decided to start saving the money we save each month “just in case.” However there were premium products we did not scale back on like liquor, diapers, detergent, soap – only because we felt they were worth the money. Bottom line, if it seems worth it, we will find a way to get it but are more sensible about our spending habits.

  • Heather

    I do think that we will re-learn to spend and marketers will need to adjust accordingly. For example, about a year ago my dogs got the best food, treats, care from the chain pet store. My husband lost his job and we had to cut. I just added dog food to the 'ol Wal Mart list and saved about 60 bucks a month. My husband found a job and we are back on our feet. We have found that the dogs lived and decided to start saving the money we save each month “just in case.” However there were premium products we did not scale back on like liquor, diapers, detergent, soap – only because we felt they were worth the money. Bottom line, if it seems worth it, we will find a way to get it but are more sensible about our spending habits.

  • Heather

    I do think that we will re-learn to spend and marketers will need to adjust accordingly. For example, about a year ago my dogs got the best food, treats, care from the chain pet store. My husband lost his job and we had to cut. I just added dog food to the 'ol Wal Mart list and saved about 60 bucks a month. My husband found a job and we are back on our feet. We have found that the dogs lived and decided to start saving the money we save each month “just in case.” However there were premium products we did not scale back on like liquor, diapers, detergent, soap – only because we felt they were worth the money. Bottom line, if it seems worth it, we will find a way to get it but are more sensible about our spending habits.

  • Heather

    I do think that we will re-learn to spend and marketers will need to adjust accordingly. For example, about a year ago my dogs got the best food, treats, care from the chain pet store. My husband lost his job and we had to cut. I just added dog food to the 'ol Wal Mart list and saved about 60 bucks a month. My husband found a job and we are back on our feet. We have found that the dogs lived and decided to start saving the money we save each month “just in case.” However there were premium products we did not scale back on like liquor, diapers, detergent, soap – only because we felt they were worth the money. Bottom line, if it seems worth it, we will find a way to get it but are more sensible about our spending habits.

    • Great response, Heather. And spot on what I was hoping to hear. What you've said is that yes, some premium brands may suffer. Others won't. It's the “it seems worth it” that marketers need to A) Hope for and B) Create in their consumers. Bravo.

      Hope the dogs don't hold a grudge. Heh.

  • Nice article Jason; and thanks for the link to mine. I think a lot of companies struggle to find a true place in the hearts of their customers. They fail to identify how their products and/or services align with and meet an emotional need.

    When you're working at that level, you transition from “nice to have” to “must have.” You'll weather economic tumults much better as a “must have;” but as you and I intimately know, positioning a company to get there is easier said than done.

  • Nice article Jason; and thanks for the link to mine. I think a lot of companies struggle to find a true place in the hearts of their customers. They fail to identify how their products and/or services align with and meet an emotional need.

    When you're working at that level, you transition from “nice to have” to “must have.” You'll weather economic tumults much better as a “must have;” but as you and I intimately know, positioning a company to get there is easier said than done.

  • Nice article Jason; and thanks for the link to mine. I think a lot of companies struggle to find a true place in the hearts of their customers. They fail to identify how their products and/or services align with and meet an emotional need.

    When you're working at that level, you transition from “nice to have” to “must have.” You'll weather economic tumults much better as a “must have;” but as you and I intimately know, positioning a company to get there is easier said than done.

  • Nice article Jason; and thanks for the link to mine. I think a lot of companies struggle to find a true place in the hearts of their customers. They fail to identify how their products and/or services align with and meet an emotional need.

    When you're working at that level, you transition from “nice to have” to “must have.” You'll weather economic tumults much better as a “must have;” but as you and I intimately know, positioning a company to get there is easier said than done.

  • Nice article Jason; and thanks for the link to mine. I think a lot of companies struggle to find a true place in the hearts of their customers. They fail to identify how their products and/or services align with and meet an emotional need.

    When you're working at that level, you transition from “nice to have” to “must have.” You'll weather economic tumults much better as a “must have;” but as you and I intimately know, positioning a company to get there is easier said than done.

  • Nice article Jason; and thanks for the link to mine. I think a lot of companies struggle to find a true place in the hearts of their customers. They fail to identify how their products and/or services align with and meet an emotional need.

    When you're working at that level, you transition from “nice to have” to “must have.” You'll weather economic tumults much better as a “must have;” but as you and I intimately know, positioning a company to get there is easier said than done.

  • Nice article Jason; and thanks for the link to mine. I think a lot of companies struggle to find a true place in the hearts of their customers. They fail to identify how their products and/or services align with and meet an emotional need.

    When you're working at that level, you transition from “nice to have” to “must have.” You'll weather economic tumults much better as a “must have;” but as you and I intimately know, positioning a company to get there is easier said than done.

  • Nice article Jason; and thanks for the link to mine. I think a lot of companies struggle to find a true place in the hearts of their customers. They fail to identify how their products and/or services align with and meet an emotional need.

    When you're working at that level, you transition from “nice to have” to “must have.” You'll weather economic tumults much better as a “must have;” but as you and I intimately know, positioning a company to get there is easier said than done.

  • Nice article Jason; and thanks for the link to mine. I think a lot of companies struggle to find a true place in the hearts of their customers. They fail to identify how their products and/or services align with and meet an emotional need.

    When you're working at that level, you transition from “nice to have” to “must have.” You'll weather economic tumults much better as a “must have;” but as you and I intimately know, positioning a company to get there is easier said than done.

  • Nice article Jason; and thanks for the link to mine. I think a lot of companies struggle to find a true place in the hearts of their customers. They fail to identify how their products and/or services align with and meet an emotional need.

    When you're working at that level, you transition from “nice to have” to “must have.” You'll weather economic tumults much better as a “must have;” but as you and I intimately know, positioning a company to get there is easier said than done.

  • Nice article Jason; and thanks for the link to mine. I think a lot of companies struggle to find a true place in the hearts of their customers. They fail to identify how their products and/or services align with and meet an emotional need.

    When you're working at that level, you transition from “nice to have” to “must have.” You'll weather economic tumults much better as a “must have;” but as you and I intimately know, positioning a company to get there is easier said than done.

  • Nice article Jason; and thanks for the link to mine. I think a lot of companies struggle to find a true place in the hearts of their customers. They fail to identify how their products and/or services align with and meet an emotional need.

    When you're working at that level, you transition from “nice to have” to “must have.” You'll weather economic tumults much better as a “must have;” but as you and I intimately know, positioning a company to get there is easier said than done.

  • Nice article Jason; and thanks for the link to mine. I think a lot of companies struggle to find a true place in the hearts of their customers. They fail to identify how their products and/or services align with and meet an emotional need.

    When you're working at that level, you transition from “nice to have” to “must have.” You'll weather economic tumults much better as a “must have;” but as you and I intimately know, positioning a company to get there is easier said than done.

    • Amen to that, Brother Nick. And I would say that premium brands are, for the most part, must haves in the minds of their owners. But still, would a long period of economic unrest lead people to rethink even the must haves in their lives? It just might.

  • Well, this may be a duh comment, but premium brands need to cut back their mark- ups. I have never been one to spend for most premiums. One of the few premiums I do insist on, however, is my Vodka. Here I do not plan to scrimp on brands, ever. But, I admit to buying less of it over all right now. I;ll do without all together before buying the cheap crap. I say companies need to find ways to lower prices, offer deals and specials, in short stop gouging people. This is going to be a necessity for the survival of any brand. Plus, I think once people get into the swing of spending less, that trend may indeed hang for a while even after the economy turns around.

  • Well, this may be a duh comment, but premium brands need to cut back their mark- ups. I have never been one to spend for most premiums. One of the few premiums I do insist on, however, is my Vodka. Here I do not plan to scrimp on brands, ever. But, I admit to buying less of it over all right now. I;ll do without all together before buying the cheap crap. I say companies need to find ways to lower prices, offer deals and specials, in short stop gouging people. This is going to be a necessity for the survival of any brand. Plus, I think once people get into the swing of spending less, that trend may indeed hang for a while even after the economy turns around.

  • Well, this may be a duh comment, but premium brands need to cut back their mark- ups. I have never been one to spend for most premiums. One of the few premiums I do insist on, however, is my Vodka. Here I do not plan to scrimp on brands, ever. But, I admit to buying less of it over all right now. I;ll do without all together before buying the cheap crap. I say companies need to find ways to lower prices, offer deals and specials, in short stop gouging people. This is going to be a necessity for the survival of any brand. Plus, I think once people get into the swing of spending less, that trend may indeed hang for a while even after the economy turns around.

  • Well, this may be a duh comment, but premium brands need to cut back their mark- ups. I have never been one to spend for most premiums. One of the few premiums I do insist on, however, is my Vodka. Here I do not plan to scrimp on brands, ever. But, I admit to buying less of it over all right now. I;ll do without all together before buying the cheap crap. I say companies need to find ways to lower prices, offer deals and specials, in short stop gouging people. This is going to be a necessity for the survival of any brand. Plus, I think once people get into the swing of spending less, that trend may indeed hang for a while even after the economy turns around.

  • Well, this may be a duh comment, but premium brands need to cut back their mark- ups. I have never been one to spend for most premiums. One of the few premiums I do insist on, however, is my Vodka. Here I do not plan to scrimp on brands, ever. But, I admit to buying less of it over all right now. I;ll do without all together before buying the cheap crap. I say companies need to find ways to lower prices, offer deals and specials, in short stop gouging people. This is going to be a necessity for the survival of any brand. Plus, I think once people get into the swing of spending less, that trend may indeed hang for a while even after the economy turns around.

  • Well, this may be a duh comment, but premium brands need to cut back their mark- ups. I have never been one to spend for most premiums. One of the few premiums I do insist on, however, is my Vodka. Here I do not plan to scrimp on brands, ever. But, I admit to buying less of it over all right now. I;ll do without all together before buying the cheap crap. I say companies need to find ways to lower prices, offer deals and specials, in short stop gouging people. This is going to be a necessity for the survival of any brand. Plus, I think once people get into the swing of spending less, that trend may indeed hang for a while even after the economy turns around.

  • Well, this may be a duh comment, but premium brands need to cut back their mark- ups. I have never been one to spend for most premiums. One of the few premiums I do insist on, however, is my Vodka. Here I do not plan to scrimp on brands, ever. But, I admit to buying less of it over all right now. I;ll do without all together before buying the cheap crap. I say companies need to find ways to lower prices, offer deals and specials, in short stop gouging people. This is going to be a necessity for the survival of any brand. Plus, I think once people get into the swing of spending less, that trend may indeed hang for a while even after the economy turns around.

  • Well, this may be a duh comment, but premium brands need to cut back their mark- ups. I have never been one to spend for most premiums. One of the few premiums I do insist on, however, is my Vodka. Here I do not plan to scrimp on brands, ever. But, I admit to buying less of it over all right now. I;ll do without all together before buying the cheap crap. I say companies need to find ways to lower prices, offer deals and specials, in short stop gouging people. This is going to be a necessity for the survival of any brand. Plus, I think once people get into the swing of spending less, that trend may indeed hang for a while even after the economy turns around.

  • Well, this may be a duh comment, but premium brands need to cut back their mark- ups. I have never been one to spend for most premiums. One of the few premiums I do insist on, however, is my Vodka. Here I do not plan to scrimp on brands, ever. But, I admit to buying less of it over all right now. I;ll do without all together before buying the cheap crap. I say companies need to find ways to lower prices, offer deals and specials, in short stop gouging people. This is going to be a necessity for the survival of any brand. Plus, I think once people get into the swing of spending less, that trend may indeed hang for a while even after the economy turns around.

  • Well, this may be a duh comment, but premium brands need to cut back their mark- ups. I have never been one to spend for most premiums. One of the few premiums I do insist on, however, is my Vodka. Here I do not plan to scrimp on brands, ever. But, I admit to buying less of it over all right now. I;ll do without all together before buying the cheap crap. I say companies need to find ways to lower prices, offer deals and specials, in short stop gouging people. This is going to be a necessity for the survival of any brand. Plus, I think once people get into the swing of spending less, that trend may indeed hang for a while even after the economy turns around.

  • Well, this may be a duh comment, but premium brands need to cut back their mark- ups. I have never been one to spend for most premiums. One of the few premiums I do insist on, however, is my Vodka. Here I do not plan to scrimp on brands, ever. But, I admit to buying less of it over all right now. I;ll do without all together before buying the cheap crap. I say companies need to find ways to lower prices, offer deals and specials, in short stop gouging people. This is going to be a necessity for the survival of any brand. Plus, I think once people get into the swing of spending less, that trend may indeed hang for a while even after the economy turns around.

  • Well, this may be a duh comment, but premium brands need to cut back their mark- ups. I have never been one to spend for most premiums. One of the few premiums I do insist on, however, is my Vodka. Here I do not plan to scrimp on brands, ever. But, I admit to buying less of it over all right now. I;ll do without all together before buying the cheap crap. I say companies need to find ways to lower prices, offer deals and specials, in short stop gouging people. This is going to be a necessity for the survival of any brand. Plus, I think once people get into the swing of spending less, that trend may indeed hang for a while even after the economy turns around.

  • Well, this may be a duh comment, but premium brands need to cut back their mark- ups. I have never been one to spend for most premiums. One of the few premiums I do insist on, however, is my Vodka. Here I do not plan to scrimp on brands, ever. But, I admit to buying less of it over all right now. I;ll do without all together before buying the cheap crap. I say companies need to find ways to lower prices, offer deals and specials, in short stop gouging people. This is going to be a necessity for the survival of any brand. Plus, I think once people get into the swing of spending less, that trend may indeed hang for a while even after the economy turns around.

    • Fair points, Cuz. (For the readers, she is my cousin.) I would only push back a bit to say that premiums at a discount are no longer premiums. That's part of the appeal – they are more expensive because they should be. Sure, there are some brands that shouldn't be but are, but in general you pay more to get better quality stuff. Unless the cheap crap is going to also cut their prices, the premiums can't go down, or at least not down much.

      And I wouldn't say premium brands gouge people. That's the lefty, socialist, power to the people streak coming out in you. Heh. If I make a good product that's fairly priced against competitors, it's not gouging. Especially if someone will pay that price. Just ask your Vodka company.

      Thanks for commenting on my blog, yo. It's much more friendly than the last comment you left on a blog of mine. (For the readers – She blistered my butt on an old personal blog once. It was quite amusing in retrospect. Heh.)

  • Would love to help, but unfortunately, I drink Busch and drive a 10 year old Jeep, so I'm not familiar with the “step-up” experience.

  • Would love to help, but unfortunately, I drink Busch and drive a 10 year old Jeep, so I'm not familiar with the “step-up” experience.

  • Would love to help, but unfortunately, I drink Busch and drive a 10 year old Jeep, so I'm not familiar with the “step-up” experience.

  • Would love to help, but unfortunately, I drink Busch and drive a 10 year old Jeep, so I'm not familiar with the “step-up” experience.

  • Would love to help, but unfortunately, I drink Busch and drive a 10 year old Jeep, so I'm not familiar with the “step-up” experience.

  • Would love to help, but unfortunately, I drink Busch and drive a 10 year old Jeep, so I'm not familiar with the “step-up” experience.

  • Would love to help, but unfortunately, I drink Busch and drive a 10 year old Jeep, so I'm not familiar with the “step-up” experience.

  • Would love to help, but unfortunately, I drink Busch and drive a 10 year old Jeep, so I'm not familiar with the “step-up” experience.

  • Would love to help, but unfortunately, I drink Busch and drive a 10 year old Jeep, so I'm not familiar with the “step-up” experience.

  • Would love to help, but unfortunately, I drink Busch and drive a 10 year old Jeep, so I'm not familiar with the “step-up” experience.

  • Would love to help, but unfortunately, I drink Busch and drive a 10 year old Jeep, so I'm not familiar with the “step-up” experience.

  • Would love to help, but unfortunately, I drink Busch and drive a 10 year old Jeep, so I'm not familiar with the “step-up” experience.

  • Would love to help, but unfortunately, I drink Busch and drive a 10 year old Jeep, so I'm not familiar with the “step-up” experience.

    • Yeah, that might be the best comment of the year.

  • Thanks Don. If I read your comment right, you believe that premium products won't neccessarily suffer so long as they are durable and the premium is returned in length of use? That makes perfect sense to me and is a very logical argument. I just wonder if the average consumer is going to equate a higher price with longer lasting. Sure, I'll pay a higher price for a durable car that doesn't have as much record of maintenance troubles, but what about a food item? A pair of around-the-house or gym shoes? A haircut?

    You're right, communicating the value is a critical challenge for brands moving forward, but if you can get BigK diet soda for $0.99 and Pepsi and Coke cost $2.99 … is this economy enough to make you switch for good?

    Thanks for the thoughts! Great points for certain.

  • Thanks Don. If I read your comment right, you believe that premium products won't neccessarily suffer so long as they are durable and the premium is returned in length of use? That makes perfect sense to me and is a very logical argument. I just wonder if the average consumer is going to equate a higher price with longer lasting. Sure, I'll pay a higher price for a durable car that doesn't have as much record of maintenance troubles, but what about a food item? A pair of around-the-house or gym shoes? A haircut?

    You're right, communicating the value is a critical challenge for brands moving forward, but if you can get BigK diet soda for $0.99 and Pepsi and Coke cost $2.99 … is this economy enough to make you switch for good?

    Thanks for the thoughts! Great points for certain.

  • Thanks Don. If I read your comment right, you believe that premium products won't neccessarily suffer so long as they are durable and the premium is returned in length of use? That makes perfect sense to me and is a very logical argument. I just wonder if the average consumer is going to equate a higher price with longer lasting. Sure, I'll pay a higher price for a durable car that doesn't have as much record of maintenance troubles, but what about a food item? A pair of around-the-house or gym shoes? A haircut?

    You're right, communicating the value is a critical challenge for brands moving forward, but if you can get BigK diet soda for $0.99 and Pepsi and Coke cost $2.99 … is this economy enough to make you switch for good?

    Thanks for the thoughts! Great points for certain.

  • Thanks Don. If I read your comment right, you believe that premium products won't neccessarily suffer so long as they are durable and the premium is returned in length of use? That makes perfect sense to me and is a very logical argument. I just wonder if the average consumer is going to equate a higher price with longer lasting. Sure, I'll pay a higher price for a durable car that doesn't have as much record of maintenance troubles, but what about a food item? A pair of around-the-house or gym shoes? A haircut?

    You're right, communicating the value is a critical challenge for brands moving forward, but if you can get BigK diet soda for $0.99 and Pepsi and Coke cost $2.99 … is this economy enough to make you switch for good?

    Thanks for the thoughts! Great points for certain.

  • Thanks Don. If I read your comment right, you believe that premium products won't neccessarily suffer so long as they are durable and the premium is returned in length of use? That makes perfect sense to me and is a very logical argument. I just wonder if the average consumer is going to equate a higher price with longer lasting. Sure, I'll pay a higher price for a durable car that doesn't have as much record of maintenance troubles, but what about a food item? A pair of around-the-house or gym shoes? A haircut?

    You're right, communicating the value is a critical challenge for brands moving forward, but if you can get BigK diet soda for $0.99 and Pepsi and Coke cost $2.99 … is this economy enough to make you switch for good?

    Thanks for the thoughts! Great points for certain.

  • Thanks Don. If I read your comment right, you believe that premium products won't neccessarily suffer so long as they are durable and the premium is returned in length of use? That makes perfect sense to me and is a very logical argument. I just wonder if the average consumer is going to equate a higher price with longer lasting. Sure, I'll pay a higher price for a durable car that doesn't have as much record of maintenance troubles, but what about a food item? A pair of around-the-house or gym shoes? A haircut?

    You're right, communicating the value is a critical challenge for brands moving forward, but if you can get BigK diet soda for $0.99 and Pepsi and Coke cost $2.99 … is this economy enough to make you switch for good?

    Thanks for the thoughts! Great points for certain.

  • Thanks Don. If I read your comment right, you believe that premium products won't neccessarily suffer so long as they are durable and the premium is returned in length of use? That makes perfect sense to me and is a very logical argument. I just wonder if the average consumer is going to equate a higher price with longer lasting. Sure, I'll pay a higher price for a durable car that doesn't have as much record of maintenance troubles, but what about a food item? A pair of around-the-house or gym shoes? A haircut?

    You're right, communicating the value is a critical challenge for brands moving forward, but if you can get BigK diet soda for $0.99 and Pepsi and Coke cost $2.99 … is this economy enough to make you switch for good?

    Thanks for the thoughts! Great points for certain.

  • Thanks Don. If I read your comment right, you believe that premium products won't neccessarily suffer so long as they are durable and the premium is returned in length of use? That makes perfect sense to me and is a very logical argument. I just wonder if the average consumer is going to equate a higher price with longer lasting. Sure, I'll pay a higher price for a durable car that doesn't have as much record of maintenance troubles, but what about a food item? A pair of around-the-house or gym shoes? A haircut?

    You're right, communicating the value is a critical challenge for brands moving forward, but if you can get BigK diet soda for $0.99 and Pepsi and Coke cost $2.99 … is this economy enough to make you switch for good?

    Thanks for the thoughts! Great points for certain.

  • Thanks Don. If I read your comment right, you believe that premium products won't neccessarily suffer so long as they are durable and the premium is returned in length of use? That makes perfect sense to me and is a very logical argument. I just wonder if the average consumer is going to equate a higher price with longer lasting. Sure, I'll pay a higher price for a durable car that doesn't have as much record of maintenance troubles, but what about a food item? A pair of around-the-house or gym shoes? A haircut?

    You're right, communicating the value is a critical challenge for brands moving forward, but if you can get BigK diet soda for $0.99 and Pepsi and Coke cost $2.99 … is this economy enough to make you switch for good?

    Thanks for the thoughts! Great points for certain.

  • Thanks Don. If I read your comment right, you believe that premium products won't neccessarily suffer so long as they are durable and the premium is returned in length of use? That makes perfect sense to me and is a very logical argument. I just wonder if the average consumer is going to equate a higher price with longer lasting. Sure, I'll pay a higher price for a durable car that doesn't have as much record of maintenance troubles, but what about a food item? A pair of around-the-house or gym shoes? A haircut?

    You're right, communicating the value is a critical challenge for brands moving forward, but if you can get BigK diet soda for $0.99 and Pepsi and Coke cost $2.99 … is this economy enough to make you switch for good?

    Thanks for the thoughts! Great points for certain.

  • Thanks Don. If I read your comment right, you believe that premium products won't neccessarily suffer so long as they are durable and the premium is returned in length of use? That makes perfect sense to me and is a very logical argument. I just wonder if the average consumer is going to equate a higher price with longer lasting. Sure, I'll pay a higher price for a durable car that doesn't have as much record of maintenance troubles, but what about a food item? A pair of around-the-house or gym shoes? A haircut?

    You're right, communicating the value is a critical challenge for brands moving forward, but if you can get BigK diet soda for $0.99 and Pepsi and Coke cost $2.99 … is this economy enough to make you switch for good?

    Thanks for the thoughts! Great points for certain.

  • Thanks Don. If I read your comment right, you believe that premium products won't neccessarily suffer so long as they are durable and the premium is returned in length of use? That makes perfect sense to me and is a very logical argument. I just wonder if the average consumer is going to equate a higher price with longer lasting. Sure, I'll pay a higher price for a durable car that doesn't have as much record of maintenance troubles, but what about a food item? A pair of around-the-house or gym shoes? A haircut?

    You're right, communicating the value is a critical challenge for brands moving forward, but if you can get BigK diet soda for $0.99 and Pepsi and Coke cost $2.99 … is this economy enough to make you switch for good?

    Thanks for the thoughts! Great points for certain.

  • enjoyed @jasonfalls post on how the recession will affect buying habits http://twurl.nl/aiu6ad

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Another really well thought out post by @jasonfalls http://snurl.com/gu75l Will the economy change our spending habits?

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Will the economy change our spending habits for years to come? (from @jasonfalls) I say, “Yes.” What say you? http://bit.ly/AglSQ

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • I think this is spot-on but I believe it'll have the greatest impact on the acceptable product lifespan of durable goods from cars to certain wardrobe staples.

    The blistering speed of technology advancement will limit the expected life span of electronics, but some items, like automobiles, winter boots and backpacks will require more value to survive in the new consumer mindset.

    Value costs money, but is almost always a better buy, so communicating that value is going to be a critical piece of the puzzle for brands who want to trade on it.

  • I think this is spot-on but I believe it'll have the greatest impact on the acceptable product lifespan of durable goods from cars to certain wardrobe staples.

    The blistering speed of technology advancement will limit the expected life span of electronics, but some items, like automobiles, winter boots and backpacks will require more value to survive in the new consumer mindset.

    Value costs money, but is almost always a better buy, so communicating that value is going to be a critical piece of the puzzle for brands who want to trade on it.

  • I think this is spot-on but I believe it'll have the greatest impact on the acceptable product lifespan of durable goods from cars to certain wardrobe staples.

    The blistering speed of technology advancement will limit the expected life span of electronics, but some items, like automobiles, winter boots and backpacks will require more value to survive in the new consumer mindset.

    Value costs money, but is almost always a better buy, so communicating that value is going to be a critical piece of the puzzle for brands who want to trade on it.

  • I think this is spot-on but I believe it'll have the greatest impact on the acceptable product lifespan of durable goods from cars to certain wardrobe staples.

    The blistering speed of technology advancement will limit the expected life span of electronics, but some items, like automobiles, winter boots and backpacks will require more value to survive in the new consumer mindset.

    Value costs money, but is almost always a better buy, so communicating that value is going to be a critical piece of the puzzle for brands who want to trade on it.

  • I think this is spot-on but I believe it'll have the greatest impact on the acceptable product lifespan of durable goods from cars to certain wardrobe staples.

    The blistering speed of technology advancement will limit the expected life span of electronics, but some items, like automobiles, winter boots and backpacks will require more value to survive in the new consumer mindset.

    Value costs money, but is almost always a better buy, so communicating that value is going to be a critical piece of the puzzle for brands who want to trade on it.

  • I think this is spot-on but I believe it'll have the greatest impact on the acceptable product lifespan of durable goods from cars to certain wardrobe staples.

    The blistering speed of technology advancement will limit the expected life span of electronics, but some items, like automobiles, winter boots and backpacks will require more value to survive in the new consumer mindset.

    Value costs money, but is almost always a better buy, so communicating that value is going to be a critical piece of the puzzle for brands who want to trade on it.

  • I think this is spot-on but I believe it'll have the greatest impact on the acceptable product lifespan of durable goods from cars to certain wardrobe staples.

    The blistering speed of technology advancement will limit the expected life span of electronics, but some items, like automobiles, winter boots and backpacks will require more value to survive in the new consumer mindset.

    Value costs money, but is almost always a better buy, so communicating that value is going to be a critical piece of the puzzle for brands who want to trade on it.

  • I think this is spot-on but I believe it'll have the greatest impact on the acceptable product lifespan of durable goods from cars to certain wardrobe staples.

    The blistering speed of technology advancement will limit the expected life span of electronics, but some items, like automobiles, winter boots and backpacks will require more value to survive in the new consumer mindset.

    Value costs money, but is almost always a better buy, so communicating that value is going to be a critical piece of the puzzle for brands who want to trade on it.

  • I think this is spot-on but I believe it'll have the greatest impact on the acceptable product lifespan of durable goods from cars to certain wardrobe staples.

    The blistering speed of technology advancement will limit the expected life span of electronics, but some items, like automobiles, winter boots and backpacks will require more value to survive in the new consumer mindset.

    Value costs money, but is almost always a better buy, so communicating that value is going to be a critical piece of the puzzle for brands who want to trade on it.

  • I think this is spot-on but I believe it'll have the greatest impact on the acceptable product lifespan of durable goods from cars to certain wardrobe staples.

    The blistering speed of technology advancement will limit the expected life span of electronics, but some items, like automobiles, winter boots and backpacks will require more value to survive in the new consumer mindset.

    Value costs money, but is almost always a better buy, so communicating that value is going to be a critical piece of the puzzle for brands who want to trade on it.

  • I think this is spot-on but I believe it'll have the greatest impact on the acceptable product lifespan of durable goods from cars to certain wardrobe staples.

    The blistering speed of technology advancement will limit the expected life span of electronics, but some items, like automobiles, winter boots and backpacks will require more value to survive in the new consumer mindset.

    Value costs money, but is almost always a better buy, so communicating that value is going to be a critical piece of the puzzle for brands who want to trade on it.

  • I think this is spot-on but I believe it'll have the greatest impact on the acceptable product lifespan of durable goods from cars to certain wardrobe staples.

    The blistering speed of technology advancement will limit the expected life span of electronics, but some items, like automobiles, winter boots and backpacks will require more value to survive in the new consumer mindset.

    Value costs money, but is almost always a better buy, so communicating that value is going to be a critical piece of the puzzle for brands who want to trade on it.

  • I think this is spot-on but I believe it'll have the greatest impact on the acceptable product lifespan of durable goods from cars to certain wardrobe staples.

    The blistering speed of technology advancement will limit the expected life span of electronics, but some items, like automobiles, winter boots and backpacks will require more value to survive in the new consumer mindset.

    Value costs money, but is almost always a better buy, so communicating that value is going to be a critical piece of the puzzle for brands who want to trade on it.

    • Thanks Don. If I read your comment right, you believe that premium products won't neccessarily suffer so long as they are durable and the premium is returned in length of use? That makes perfect sense to me and is a very logical argument. I just wonder if the average consumer is going to equate a higher price with longer lasting. Sure, I'll pay a higher price for a durable car that doesn't have as much record of maintenance troubles, but what about a food item? A pair of around-the-house or gym shoes? A haircut?

      You're right, communicating the value is a critical challenge for brands moving forward, but if you can get BigK diet soda for $0.99 and Pepsi and Coke cost $2.99 … is this economy enough to make you switch for good?

      Thanks for the thoughts! Great points for certain.

  • worth reading Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? http://ow.ly/4588

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Will The Economy Change Our Spending Habits? http://ow.ly/45aQ #ecommerce

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  • Social Explorer Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? http://tinyurl.com/chmogg

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • @JasonFalls on changing buying habits http://www.socialmediaexplorer.com/2009/04/27/will-the-recession-change-our-buying-habits-for-good/

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Social Media Explore Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good?: There’s an.. http://twurl.nl/vjy81w

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? http://tr.im/jNUa

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? http://tr.im/jNSQ

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • RT @ploked Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? http://ow.ly/44uu #recession

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  • SocialMediaExp: Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? | How To: http://tinyurl.com/d75uqd Full http://tinyurl.com/chmogg

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • reading a good post Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? http://ow.ly/44uu

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? http://tinyurl.com/czgw2r

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • reading Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? http://ow.ly/44v6

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • SMExplorer: Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good?: There’s an interesting artic.. http://tinyurl.com/chmogg

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Will The Recession Change Our Buying Habits For Good? http://tinyurl.com/chmogg

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter