10 Promotional Mistakes Of New Bloggers - Social Media Explorer
10 Promotional Mistakes Of New Bloggers
10 Promotional Mistakes Of New Bloggers
by

In preparation for Wednesday’s Social Media Club Chicago speaking engagement, I asked the prospective attendees via the Facebook Event Page Wall if there were any questions they wanted me to prepare to answer at the event. Fausto Fernós was the only real respondent, but he asked a great question:

“What are the ten common mistakes bloggers make when getting people interested in their blog?”

At first I could only come up with three or four, but thought more about it and did come up with 10 (okay nine, but I through threw number 10 in for fun). Here’s the list of what to avoid as a new blogger, corporate, independent or otherwise:

1. Self-promoting over sharing

Too many new bloggers dive right into promoting their posts by bookmarking them on Digg, Reddit, StumbleUpon, sending emails out to people they know and even Tweeting their new blog posts. None of this is totally wrong, but in order to achieve influence in the social media space you have to share more than your own content or you become, by definition, a spammer. Make sure you’re promoting good content from around the web, friends’ blogs, funny things you find on YouTube, etc., before you start pimping your own stuff. Even then, keep your self-promotion to a lull. Most smart bloggers make friends with fellow bloggers who have good profiles and influence on the social bookmarking sites and trade off submission favors or find someone they can simply ask to submit the post to the various sites.

2. Focusing on promotion over content

I don’t care how good of a salesman or promoter you are, if you aren’t focused first on pushing out good content, you won’t be optimally successful as a blogger. You have to deliver what the audience is coming for or the audience will stop coming back.

3. Shot-gunning promotions to too many communities

MyBlogLog, BlogCatalog, StumbleUpon, Digg, Facebook, MySpace, Twitter … where do you start? Unfortunately, most new bloggers start with all or more of them. A more effective way to build your blog following is to focus on the ones that make most sense to your audience. If you blog about women’s issues, for instance, you might focus your community building and promotional activity on Kirtsy or by participating on similar BlogHer network blogs. Those are the audiences you want because those are the ones that will come back, comment and share your blog with others.

4. Not targeting other bloggers

Many new bloggers tend to forget that it doesn’t take a full blown social network for there to be a vibrant community to target. Blogs, or more specifically the comments sections of good blogs, are micro-communities in and of themselves. When I started Social Media Explorer, I began reading the top blogs in social media, interacting with the authors, arranging to meet them at conferences and so on. By engaging them on a one-on-one basis, I put myself, and thus by blog, top-of-mind for them. The mentions and links naturally followed.

5. Not commenting on other blogs

A carry over from No. 4 above, you should participate in the communities around blogs related to your topic by commenting on them. By showing off your expertise interacting with others there, they’ll naturally click through to your blog and start interacting on your new community as well.

6. Not valuing the face-to-face

Nothing makes me read someone else’s blog more than having a face-to-face interaction with them. Having a true-life, personal connection gives me the notion that a I know them, even if not well. I’m much more apt to remember or want to read their blog. Whether it’s a Tweet-up, a lunch or a conference, networking for your blog isn’t limited to the online type.

7. Thinking you’re smarter than everyone else

Closely aligned with my guidelines to promoting your blog rule No. 5 (Don’t be a dick.), the moment you start being condescending or argumentative about your blog topic to others is the moment you start losing readers. This isn’t just true for bloggers, but for people. Think of the person at your office or friend of the family who’s a little on the arrogant side. The guy who always butts in and corrects people’s stories at parties and comes off as a Mr. Know-it-all. Do you really like him? Do you care what he thinks? Me either. Don’t be that guy (or gal).

8. Looking to get and not give

Sharing is the essence of social media. If you’re totally focused on your blog and not willing to write guest posts for others, allow bloggers to guest post on yours, you’re missing a whole world of opportunity to promote your blog properly. Besides, karma has a way of coming back to bite you in the ass. When someone asks for advice, volunteer it. If someone asks you to guest post or contribute to their website, volunteer it. Don’t ask for anything in return and it will come back to you in multiples.

9. Turning your blog into an whore house for ads

There’s nothing wrong with having advertising on your blog. But when you go to a new blog you’ve discovered and there are 50 affiliate ads, a couple of “buy this” widgets and flashing banners and buttons all over the place, you probably won’t come back. Yes, we understand that you are under the impression that everyone can make six figures as a blogger, but the $13.68 you get at the end of the month for your seven different Google ads on your blog’s home page isn’t worth all the folks who clicked, saw and bolted.

10. You forget to floss

Okay, this is a throw-away one because Fausto asked for 10, though I highly recommend flossing. Nothing says, “Don’t read this guys blog,” louder than chunks of crap in someone’s teeth. I couldn’t think of another good one, so help me by offering your suggestion in the comments.

Thanks Fausto. Appreciate the inspiration.

IMAGE: “Error” by Nick J. Webb on Flickr.

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About the Author

Jason Falls
Jason Falls is the founder of Social Media Explorer and one of the most notable and outspoken voices in the social media marketing industry. He is a noted marketing keynote speaker, author of two books and unapologetic bourbon aficionado. He can also be found at JasonFalls.com.
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  • Hatim

    Nice article.
    read every single one and following the 5th one by commenting here. :).
    Anyways nice article thanks buddy.

    visit my site http://www.earn-faster.blogspot.com

  • That was a good help for me and I would like that you keep teh tip reagarding limiting ad places on the top as it is the mistake taht most new bloggers do.
    http://alightheartedtalk.blogs

  • Hieu Martin

    awesome post. Thanks friend

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  • I happen to stumbleupon your article and you bring up some valuable points. I gave it a tweet for you.

    Would you be interested in guest posting for bloggertalk.net?

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  • I stumbled upon your blog. Great post and great information.

    I will be back often.

  • I stumbled upon your blog. Great post and great information.

    I will be back often.

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  • dan

    I agree with u..nowdays so many bloggers using most of their space with ads.
    I am a new blogger, so ur article such a good advice for me. thanks Jason!

  • This is amazing!Thanks so much, gotta go fix my mistakes now! :)

  • This is amazing!Thanks so much, gotta go fix my mistakes now! :)

  • This is amazing!Thanks so much, gotta go fix my mistakes now! :)

  • Hi Jason,
    It's bothering me really, cuz I have friended, commented, subscribed, followed a ton of them but when it comes to reciprocation from them, I get a maybe, 1% in return :S. My tumblr, twitter, friendfeed, plurk and other networks show lots of people that I follow and comment, but I got very few comments in return. Should I give up the social media? LOL.
    Thanks Jason!

  • Hi Jason,
    It's bothering me really, cuz I have friended, commented, subscribed, followed a ton of them but when it comes to reciprocation from them, I get a maybe, 1% in return :S. My tumblr, twitter, friendfeed, plurk and other networks show lots of people that I follow and comment, but I got very few comments in return. Should I give up the social media? LOL.
    Thanks Jason!

  • Hi Jason,
    It's bothering me really, cuz I have friended, commented, subscribed, followed a ton of them but when it comes to reciprocation from them, I get a maybe, 1% in return :S. My tumblr, twitter, friendfeed, plurk and other networks show lots of people that I follow and comment, but I got very few comments in return. Should I give up the social media? LOL.
    Thanks Jason!

  • chriswasbrown

    Awesome article! Thanks for the good advice. C. Taylor Brown
    http://chriswasbrown.blogspot.com

  • chriswasbrown

    Awesome article! Thanks for the good advice. C. Taylor Brown
    http://chriswasbrown.blogspot.com

  • chriswasbrown

    Awesome article! Thanks for the good advice. C. Taylor Brown
    http://chriswasbrown.blogspot.com

  • i agree, most blogger writes blog for money

    money oriented blog

  • i agree, most blogger writes blog for money

    money oriented blog

  • i agree, most blogger writes blog for money

    money oriented blog

  • Dear Jason

    I recently created my blog but I did not know how I could take it forward. Reading your post here has removed many of my misconcepts about blogging and networking. Good Tips.

  • Dear Jason

    I recently created my blog but I did not know how I could take it forward. Reading your post here has removed many of my misconcepts about blogging and networking. Good Tips.

  • Dear Jason

    I recently created my blog but I did not know how I could take it forward. Reading your post here has removed many of my misconcepts about blogging and networking. Good Tips.

  • Yeah, me too.

    And happy blog birthday, even if I'm belated in getting it to you.

  • Yeah, me too.

    And happy blog birthday, even if I'm belated in getting it to you.

  • You don't have to apologize for correcting me. I'm not perfect and am happy to correct mistakes (just like that one, now appropriately fixed). And don't feel ashamed in doing so. As long as you're trying to be helpful, I welcome the criticism. And my mother would be proud of you. Heh. Thanks.

  • You don't have to apologize for correcting me. I'm not perfect and am happy to correct mistakes (just like that one, now appropriately fixed). And don't feel ashamed in doing so. As long as you're trying to be helpful, I welcome the criticism. And my mother would be proud of you. Heh. Thanks.

  • Thank you, Wayne. Appreciate you stopping by.

  • Thank you, Wayne. Appreciate you stopping by.

  • yours truly

    This has really helped me in promoting my blog, and I don't want to seem like a total a-hole, but your in your second paragraph, through should be threw. I love you, sorry.

  • yours truly

    This has really helped me in promoting my blog, and I don't want to seem like a total a-hole, but your in your second paragraph, through should be threw. I love you, sorry.

  • yours truly

    This has really helped me in promoting my blog, and I don't want to seem like a total a-hole, but your in your second paragraph, through should be threw. I love you, sorry.

    • You don't have to apologize for correcting me. I'm not perfect and am happy to correct mistakes (just like that one, now appropriately fixed). And don't feel ashamed in doing so. As long as you're trying to be helpful, I welcome the criticism. And my mother would be proud of you. Heh. Thanks.

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  • Damn it, I'm doomed. I don't floss.

    Seriously, thanks for the jolt I needed to rethink my approach as my blog nears its first birthday on January 9.

  • Damn it, I'm doomed. I don't floss.

    Seriously, thanks for the jolt I needed to rethink my approach as my blog nears its first birthday on January 9.

  • Damn it, I'm doomed. I don't floss.

    Seriously, thanks for the jolt I needed to rethink my approach as my blog nears its first birthday on January 9.

    • Yeah, me too.

      And happy blog birthday, even if I'm belated in getting it to you.

  • Great advice!

  • Great advice!

  • Great advice!

    • Thank you, Wayne. Appreciate you stopping by.

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  • You're absolutely headed down the right path, sir. Thanks for stopping by and contributing. I'm glad Chris led you here, too.

  • You're absolutely headed down the right path, sir. Thanks for stopping by and contributing. I'm glad Chris led you here, too.

  • Very good point Jesse. Thanks for that. A lot of social media folks, including top bloggers, are flattered that you respect their opinion enough to ask. Many of them will take the time to read and offer input. And you're right. it does put you on their radar. Nice thoughts.

  • Very good point Jesse. Thanks for that. A lot of social media folks, including top bloggers, are flattered that you respect their opinion enough to ask. Many of them will take the time to read and offer input. And you're right. it does put you on their radar. Nice thoughts.

  • Rowl! Heh. Good luck.

  • Rowl! Heh. Good luck.

  • Thanks Jordan. Nice advice to add to it, too. Thanks for stopping by.

  • Thanks Jordan. Nice advice to add to it, too. Thanks for stopping by.

  • Thanks Niche. I've always preferred StumbleUpon to a lot of other bookmarking and voting sites for that reason. You actually see the content. I think a ton of Digg/Mixx/Reddit votes are cast without people ever having seen what they're voting for. Thanks for the input.

  • Thanks Niche. I've always preferred StumbleUpon to a lot of other bookmarking and voting sites for that reason. You actually see the content. I think a ton of Digg/Mixx/Reddit votes are cast without people ever having seen what they're voting for. Thanks for the input.

  • Thanks for stopping by and adding to the conversation, Justin. Appreciate ya!

  • Thanks for stopping by and adding to the conversation, Justin. Appreciate ya!

  • Thanks Teresa. I try to be more informative than entertaining, but sometimes I get confused. Heh.

  • Thanks Teresa. I try to be more informative than entertaining, but sometimes I get confused. Heh.

  • Nice adds, Gina. Good content is key to success, for sure. Thanks.

  • Nice adds, Gina. Good content is key to success, for sure. Thanks.

  • Bueno Bueno. The dude knows his stuff. Value your readers — excellent advice, Ricardo. Thanks for offering that.

  • Bueno Bueno. The dude knows his stuff. Value your readers — excellent advice, Ricardo. Thanks for offering that.

  • Excellent Susan. Glad to hear it. Keep up the good work.

  • Excellent Susan. Glad to hear it. Keep up the good work.

  • Thanks Nicky. I'm worried you don't know what flossing means.

    Great points on the forums, etc. I appreciate the perspective and you're right. Forums are often overlooked and valuable places to engage folks on your topic

    Thanks for chiming in.

  • Thanks Nicky. I'm worried you don't know what flossing means.

    Great points on the forums, etc. I appreciate the perspective and you're right. Forums are often overlooked and valuable places to engage folks on your topic

    Thanks for chiming in.

  • Jason, very good read and useful, I'm thankful @chrisbrogan referred me to your blog. I'm fairly new to blogging but not new to building brand, reputation and influence. For me, one of the key points (& I see this echo'ed in other comments here) is time. In our instant gratification and feedback world it's easy to think that influence should develop just as instantiously, but it's just not so. Over time you build experience, increase reputation and trust, and grow influence. I believe investing quality effort into that process is really the only way to build long lasting person brand.

  • Jason, very good read and useful, I'm thankful @chrisbrogan referred me to your blog. I'm fairly new to blogging but not new to building brand, reputation and influence. For me, one of the key points (& I see this echo'ed in other comments here) is time. In our instant gratification and feedback world it's easy to think that influence should develop just as instantiously, but it's just not so. Over time you build experience, increase reputation and trust, and grow influence. I believe investing quality effort into that process is really the only way to build long lasting person brand.

  • Jason, very good read and useful, I'm thankful @chrisbrogan referred me to your blog. I'm fairly new to blogging but not new to building brand, reputation and influence. For me, one of the key points (& I see this echo'ed in other comments here) is time. In our instant gratification and feedback world it's easy to think that influence should develop just as instantiously, but it's just not so. Over time you build experience, increase reputation and trust, and grow influence. I believe investing quality effort into that process is really the only way to build long lasting person brand.

    • You're absolutely headed down the right path, sir. Thanks for stopping by and contributing. I'm glad Chris led you here, too.

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  • Jason,

    As we've discussed I've struggled with the personal promotion aspect of blogging. I've always been someone, outside of the web, who went about my business and let my actions speak louder than words. You bring up an excellent that without some promotion you will be unable to get any exposure.

    I've found that asking the opinions of blogging/twitter icons has helped me personally. Not only does it get your material in front of them you get comments or suggestions on other points you can later blog about. It creates a relationship that is traded with my own commenting on their blogs.

  • Jason,

    As we've discussed I've struggled with the personal promotion aspect of blogging. I've always been someone, outside of the web, who went about my business and let my actions speak louder than words. You bring up an excellent that without some promotion you will be unable to get any exposure.

    I've found that asking the opinions of blogging/twitter icons has helped me personally. Not only does it get your material in front of them you get comments or suggestions on other points you can later blog about. It creates a relationship that is traded with my own commenting on their blogs.

  • Jason,

    As we've discussed I've struggled with the personal promotion aspect of blogging. I've always been someone, outside of the web, who went about my business and let my actions speak louder than words. You bring up an excellent that without some promotion you will be unable to get any exposure.

    I've found that asking the opinions of blogging/twitter icons has helped me personally. Not only does it get your material in front of them you get comments or suggestions on other points you can later blog about. It creates a relationship that is traded with my own commenting on their blogs.

    • Very good point Jesse. Thanks for that. A lot of social media folks, including top bloggers, are flattered that you respect their opinion enough to ask. Many of them will take the time to read and offer input. And you're right. it does put you on their radar. Nice thoughts.

  • MyRecordPurse

    Great tips. Well written. Now to pur into practice. Thanks.

  • MyRecordPurse

    Great tips. Well written. Now to pur into practice. Thanks.

  • MyRecordPurse

    Great tips. Well written. Now to pur into practice. Thanks.

  • There is a fine line between over zealous promoting and putting yourself out there. Some people are afraid to toot their own horn while others have firework displays with jets and flashing neon signs that point to nowhere.

    I say promote more than you normally would just make sure the flashing neon sign points to a cool destination for your readers.

    Nice work.

  • There is a fine line between over zealous promoting and putting yourself out there. Some people are afraid to toot their own horn while others have firework displays with jets and flashing neon signs that point to nowhere.

    I say promote more than you normally would just make sure the flashing neon sign points to a cool destination for your readers.

    Nice work.

  • There is a fine line between over zealous promoting and putting yourself out there. Some people are afraid to toot their own horn while others have firework displays with jets and flashing neon signs that point to nowhere.

    I say promote more than you normally would just make sure the flashing neon sign points to a cool destination for your readers.

    Nice work.

    • Thanks Jordan. Nice advice to add to it, too. Thanks for stopping by.

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  • Thanks for the tips
    I think the sharing other peoples content is much more developed with stumble upon which has a stuble button. Means you can actually view the site before giving it your vote

  • Thanks for the tips
    I think the sharing other peoples content is much more developed with stumble upon which has a stuble button. Means you can actually view the site before giving it your vote

  • Thanks for the tips
    I think the sharing other peoples content is much more developed with stumble upon which has a stuble button. Means you can actually view the site before giving it your vote

    • Thanks Niche. I've always preferred StumbleUpon to a lot of other bookmarking and voting sites for that reason. You actually see the content. I think a ton of Digg/Mixx/Reddit votes are cast without people ever having seen what they're voting for. Thanks for the input.

  • nice beginner tips here. All seems fairly simple and common sense, I love the twitter whore house for ads comment, I see alot of those and what most of them don't realize is that its a resource hog and could lose valuable readers :/

  • nice beginner tips here. All seems fairly simple and common sense, I love the twitter whore house for ads comment, I see alot of those and what most of them don't realize is that its a resource hog and could lose valuable readers :/

  • nice beginner tips here. All seems fairly simple and common sense, I love the twitter whore house for ads comment, I see alot of those and what most of them don't realize is that its a resource hog and could lose valuable readers :/

    • Thanks for stopping by and adding to the conversation, Justin. Appreciate ya!

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  • Nice article; I enjoy humorous posts that also teach you something useful. Thanks!

  • Nice article; I enjoy humorous posts that also teach you something useful. Thanks!

  • Nice article; I enjoy humorous posts that also teach you something useful. Thanks!

    • Thanks Teresa. I try to be more informative than entertaining, but sometimes I get confused. Heh.

  • gina

    Spending all your time developing a great looking blog site, but adding crappy content. Writing 7 pages of belly button gazing material with less than 10% actual information about what you are portraying as your topic.
    No amount of promotion will make me read it if this is the case. You might get one partial read out of me, and I might use your site as graphic stimuli, but that's it.

  • gina

    Spending all your time developing a great looking blog site, but adding crappy content. Writing 7 pages of belly button gazing material with less than 10% actual information about what you are portraying as your topic.
    No amount of promotion will make me read it if this is the case. You might get one partial read out of me, and I might use your site as graphic stimuli, but that's it.

  • gina

    Spending all your time developing a great looking blog site, but adding crappy content. Writing 7 pages of belly button gazing material with less than 10% actual information about what you are portraying as your topic.
    No amount of promotion will make me read it if this is the case. You might get one partial read out of me, and I might use your site as graphic stimuli, but that's it.

    • Nice adds, Gina. Good content is key to success, for sure. Thanks.

  • Regarding #5 & #7… I think it's particularly important that people remember #7 (don't think you're smarter than everyone else) when leaving a comment on someone's blog. You're a guest in their house (their blog), be polite and acknowledge their point. Have something constructive to contribute that compliments the writer and shares your point of view.

    One point I think I think new bloggers over-think is their subscriber numbers. Granted, it's nice to see the numbers grow but don't stress out about it too much. Some people make the mistake of developing the self-promotional mindset in the search of new subscribers to the extent that they ruin their relationship with their existing subscriber base (readers who are ready and willing to talk about you to their other friends on the net). Darren, Liz, Chris (and Jason too I think) would all agree…value your readers. Be present with them, get to know them, and slowly but surely, that community will grow.

  • Regarding #5 & #7… I think it's particularly important that people remember #7 (don't think you're smarter than everyone else) when leaving a comment on someone's blog. You're a guest in their house (their blog), be polite and acknowledge their point. Have something constructive to contribute that compliments the writer and shares your point of view.

    One point I think I think new bloggers over-think is their subscriber numbers. Granted, it's nice to see the numbers grow but don't stress out about it too much. Some people make the mistake of developing the self-promotional mindset in the search of new subscribers to the extent that they ruin their relationship with their existing subscriber base (readers who are ready and willing to talk about you to their other friends on the net). Darren, Liz, Chris (and Jason too I think) would all agree…value your readers. Be present with them, get to know them, and slowly but surely, that community will grow.

  • Regarding #5 & #7… I think it's particularly important that people remember #7 (don't think you're smarter than everyone else) when leaving a comment on someone's blog. You're a guest in their house (their blog), be polite and acknowledge their point. Have something constructive to contribute that compliments the writer and shares your point of view.

    One point I think I think new bloggers over-think is their subscriber numbers. Granted, it's nice to see the numbers grow but don't stress out about it too much. Some people make the mistake of developing the self-promotional mindset in the search of new subscribers to the extent that they ruin their relationship with their existing subscriber base (readers who are ready and willing to talk about you to their other friends on the net). Darren, Liz, Chris (and Jason too I think) would all agree…value your readers. Be present with them, get to know them, and slowly but surely, that community will grow.

    • Bueno Bueno. The dude knows his stuff. Value your readers — excellent advice, Ricardo. Thanks for offering that.

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  • Still to new to offer a suggestion for number ten, but so grateful the the nine that you offered.
    The great thing is that without realizing it, I have been doing most of the things you suggest.
    Thanks for your help

  • Still to new to offer a suggestion for number ten, but so grateful the the nine that you offered.
    The great thing is that without realizing it, I have been doing most of the things you suggest.
    Thanks for your help

  • Still to new to offer a suggestion for number ten, but so grateful the the nine that you offered.
    The great thing is that without realizing it, I have been doing most of the things you suggest.
    Thanks for your help

    • Excellent Susan. Glad to hear it. Keep up the good work.

  • Jason – In addition to commenting on other blogs I would add helping out in forums where your particular expertise is valued or even simply asking questions. There is always an opportunity to include your blog url and forums always appreciate users who can help out. You'd be amazed how many people, who while not immersed in social media are interested in how to design a better blog or want to understand a technical tip. I have found a high percentage of my traffic is coming from forums where I frequent to ask questions and give answers.

    I'd also second commenting on other blogs. I find many bloggers simply don't do this enough. Not only does it provide valuable backlinks to help page rank (and encourage organic ranking with Google) it is an opportunity to get into more conversation. Also, when someone takes time and comments on your blog share the comment love by going to their blog and commenting on a post of theirs. Not enough bloggers do this either. Obviously have something to say, not just “thanks for commenting on my blog….blah, blah” resolve check out their posts and say something thoughtful. They will appreciate it.

    In terms of other promotion there are also more subtle ways to go about it. Including your blog url in your email and in any offline promotions you might do.

    On point #7 Jason, I believe argument can be good as long as it's respectful and on topic. On my personal blog I write about a rather controversial topic… and the lively argument we have sometimes is good. If readers go, they go. I always get new ones. I certainly don't expect everyone to agree with what I say… and I say so. i found people promoted my posts because they said something different from “the norm.”

    But above all, focus on writing quality content that you enjoy writing and sharing and your blog will almost promote itself. Many many people blurk for quite a while before they ever post a comment… I've had people reading my blog for over a year before they de-blurk and post a comment!

    #10 – I've no idea what on earth that means and think you should have stuck with 9. :)

  • Jason – In addition to commenting on other blogs I would add helping out in forums where your particular expertise is valued or even simply asking questions. There is always an opportunity to include your blog url and forums always appreciate users who can help out. You'd be amazed how many people, who while not immersed in social media are interested in how to design a better blog or want to understand a technical tip. I have found a high percentage of my traffic is coming from forums where I frequent to ask questions and give answers.

    I'd also second commenting on other blogs. I find many bloggers simply don't do this enough. Not only does it provide valuable backlinks to help page rank (and encourage organic ranking with Google) it is an opportunity to get into more conversation. Also, when someone takes time and comments on your blog share the comment love by going to their blog and commenting on a post of theirs. Not enough bloggers do this either. Obviously have something to say, not just “thanks for commenting on my blog….blah, blah” resolve check out their posts and say something thoughtful. They will appreciate it.

    In terms of other promotion there are also more subtle ways to go about it. Including your blog url in your email and in any offline promotions you might do.

    On point #7 Jason, I believe argument can be good as long as it's respectful and on topic. On my personal blog I write about a rather controversial topic… and the lively argument we have sometimes is good. If readers go, they go. I always get new ones. I certainly don't expect everyone to agree with what I say… and I say so. i found people promoted my posts because they said something different from “the norm.”

    But above all, focus on writing quality content that you enjoy writing and sharing and your blog will almost promote itself. Many many people blurk for quite a while before they ever post a comment… I've had people reading my blog for over a year before they de-blurk and post a comment!

    #10 – I've no idea what on earth that means and think you should have stuck with 9. :)

  • Jason – In addition to commenting on other blogs I would add helping out in forums where your particular expertise is valued or even simply asking questions. There is always an opportunity to include your blog url and forums always appreciate users who can help out. You'd be amazed how many people, who while not immersed in social media are interested in how to design a better blog or want to understand a technical tip. I have found a high percentage of my traffic is coming from forums where I frequent to ask questions and give answers.

    I'd also second commenting on other blogs. I find many bloggers simply don't do this enough. Not only does it provide valuable backlinks to help page rank (and encourage organic ranking with Google) it is an opportunity to get into more conversation. Also, when someone takes time and comments on your blog share the comment love by going to their blog and commenting on a post of theirs. Not enough bloggers do this either. Obviously have something to say, not just “thanks for commenting on my blog….blah, blah” resolve check out their posts and say something thoughtful. They will appreciate it.

    In terms of other promotion there are also more subtle ways to go about it. Including your blog url in your email and in any offline promotions you might do.

    On point #7 Jason, I believe argument can be good as long as it's respectful and on topic. On my personal blog I write about a rather controversial topic… and the lively argument we have sometimes is good. If readers go, they go. I always get new ones. I certainly don't expect everyone to agree with what I say… and I say so. i found people promoted my posts because they said something different from “the norm.”

    But above all, focus on writing quality content that you enjoy writing and sharing and your blog will almost promote itself. Many many people blurk for quite a while before they ever post a comment… I've had people reading my blog for over a year before they de-blurk and post a comment!

    #10 – I've no idea what on earth that means and think you should have stuck with 9. :)

    • Thanks Nicky. I'm worried you don't know what flossing means.

      Great points on the forums, etc. I appreciate the perspective and you're right. Forums are often overlooked and valuable places to engage folks on your topic

      Thanks for chiming in.

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  • Absolutely agree on both points. Thanks, Justin.

  • Absolutely agree on both points. Thanks, Justin.

  • Thanks for adding these thoughts, Peter. You're exactly right, of course. Appreciate the comments.

  • Thanks for adding these thoughts, Peter. You're exactly right, of course. Appreciate the comments.

  • Much thanks.

  • Much thanks.

  • Excellent post Jason!

    I think one of the most important things is leaving thoughtful comments on other blogs. It helps to provide a minimal increase in traffic and it helps others, including the author, become acquainted with your blog and your views. This increases the chances that the blogger will link to them in the future, request an interview, or ask for a guest post.

    I also think that writing guest posts are critical because it allows you to get your voice out there to a new audience and also, in most cases, to a larger audience. If you're producing quality content, it also helps you to stay top-of-mind if other bloggers in the space continue to see you leaving comments, guest posting, and then also having a presence on social media sites, etc.

  • Excellent post Jason!

    I think one of the most important things is leaving thoughtful comments on other blogs. It helps to provide a minimal increase in traffic and it helps others, including the author, become acquainted with your blog and your views. This increases the chances that the blogger will link to them in the future, request an interview, or ask for a guest post.

    I also think that writing guest posts are critical because it allows you to get your voice out there to a new audience and also, in most cases, to a larger audience. If you're producing quality content, it also helps you to stay top-of-mind if other bloggers in the space continue to see you leaving comments, guest posting, and then also having a presence on social media sites, etc.

  • Excellent post Jason!

    I think one of the most important things is leaving thoughtful comments on other blogs. It helps to provide a minimal increase in traffic and it helps others, including the author, become acquainted with your blog and your views. This increases the chances that the blogger will link to them in the future, request an interview, or ask for a guest post.

    I also think that writing guest posts are critical because it allows you to get your voice out there to a new audience and also, in most cases, to a larger audience. If you're producing quality content, it also helps you to stay top-of-mind if other bloggers in the space continue to see you leaving comments, guest posting, and then also having a presence on social media sites, etc.

    • Absolutely agree on both points. Thanks, Justin.

  • Great ideas Jason. Though I have been more of a follower in the social media than a creator (blogger in this example), then your ideas are still good. I remember I spend the first couple of moths shouting around at Twitter and Friendfeed, and then wondered why I got no likes/comments… couldnt people see how insanely interesting/funny my one-liners were?… No! Of course they couldn't. No one cares if you haven't built quality content, as well as forgetting that central to all social media is CONVERSATION – meaning listening, commenting etc. and not just shouting at everyone around… I see that as a central point in many of your points. Once again, great work!

  • Great ideas Jason. Though I have been more of a follower in the social media than a creator (blogger in this example), then your ideas are still good. I remember I spend the first couple of moths shouting around at Twitter and Friendfeed, and then wondered why I got no likes/comments… couldnt people see how insanely interesting/funny my one-liners were?… No! Of course they couldn't. No one cares if you haven't built quality content, as well as forgetting that central to all social media is CONVERSATION – meaning listening, commenting etc. and not just shouting at everyone around… I see that as a central point in many of your points. Once again, great work!

  • Great ideas Jason. Though I have been more of a follower in the social media than a creator (blogger in this example), then your ideas are still good. I remember I spend the first couple of moths shouting around at Twitter and Friendfeed, and then wondered why I got no likes/comments… couldnt people see how insanely interesting/funny my one-liners were?… No! Of course they couldn't. No one cares if you haven't built quality content, as well as forgetting that central to all social media is CONVERSATION – meaning listening, commenting etc. and not just shouting at everyone around… I see that as a central point in many of your points. Once again, great work!

    • Thanks for adding these thoughts, Peter. You're exactly right, of course. Appreciate the comments.

  • Wonderful post Jason…

    Also just simple words of wisdom more people should follow in their daily lives…

  • Wonderful post Jason…

    Also just simple words of wisdom more people should follow in their daily lives…

  • Wonderful post Jason…

    Also just simple words of wisdom more people should follow in their daily lives…

  • Surely there are more folks in New Orleans on Twitter? Schedule a tweet-up, search for folks in New Orleans on Twitter and invite them all. It'll be fun.

  • Surely there are more folks in New Orleans on Twitter? Schedule a tweet-up, search for folks in New Orleans on Twitter and invite them all. It'll be fun.

  • What suggestions do you have for locating face to face opportunities in your geographical area? I'm down here rebuilding still New Orleans from Hurricane Katrina. People still look at me really weird when I mention blogging or Twitter

  • What suggestions do you have for locating face to face opportunities in your geographical area? I'm down here rebuilding still New Orleans from Hurricane Katrina. People still look at me really weird when I mention blogging or Twitter

  • What suggestions do you have for locating face to face opportunities in your geographical area? I'm down here rebuilding still New Orleans from Hurricane Katrina. People still look at me really weird when I mention blogging or Twitter

    • Surely there are more folks in New Orleans on Twitter? Schedule a tweet-up, search for folks in New Orleans on Twitter and invite them all. It'll be fun.

  • Nice thought, Anthony. I think it goes along with promoting over sharing but you're right – if you jump into social media only for selfish means, you've missed the point. Nice work.

  • Nice thought, Anthony. I think it goes along with promoting over sharing but you're right – if you jump into social media only for selfish means, you've missed the point. Nice work.

  • My number 10 – don't START using social media JUST to promote your blog. People get tired of watching someone in twitter say “new blog post” over and over. Be real. Be transparent, and allow make yourself available for conversation / communication.

    Great post here.

  • My number 10 – don't START using social media JUST to promote your blog. People get tired of watching someone in twitter say “new blog post” over and over. Be real. Be transparent, and allow make yourself available for conversation / communication.

    Great post here.

  • My number 10 – don't START using social media JUST to promote your blog. People get tired of watching someone in twitter say “new blog post” over and over. Be real. Be transparent, and allow make yourself available for conversation / communication.

    Great post here.

    • Nice thought, Anthony. I think it goes along with promoting over sharing but you're right – if you jump into social media only for selfish means, you've missed the point. Nice work.

  • Doing what I can for toothy smiles and fresh breath.

  • Doing what I can for toothy smiles and fresh breath.

  • Oh yes. I've seen some corporate blogs that have six posts in the last two years. That's no more effective that quarterly updates to your website, which isn't effective in engaging or attracting an audience either.

  • Oh yes. I've seen some corporate blogs that have six posts in the last two years. That's no more effective that quarterly updates to your website, which isn't effective in engaging or attracting an audience either.

  • And I would submit that you aren't aware that numbered lists and “how to” posts are SEO-rich, link bait blog titles that attract more traffic and in-bound links than those that are not.

  • And I would submit that you aren't aware that numbered lists and “how to” posts are SEO-rich, link bait blog titles that attract more traffic and in-bound links than those that are not.

  • Jim

    I would submit that making top 10 lists is a mistake of new bloggers.

  • Jim

    I would submit that making top 10 lists is a mistake of new bloggers.

  • Jim

    I would submit that making top 10 lists is a mistake of new bloggers.

    • And I would submit that you aren't aware that numbered lists and “how to” posts are SEO-rich, link bait blog titles that attract more traffic and in-bound links than those that are not.

  • web20blog_org

    A great list. I will be sure to floss from now on. Maybe another is not blogging. I have seen some companies say they will start blogging, but instead they just put up a corporate message and call it blog. Have you seen that too?-Ken

  • web20blog_org

    A great list. I will be sure to floss from now on. Maybe another is not blogging. I have seen some companies say they will start blogging, but instead they just put up a corporate message and call it blog. Have you seen that too?-Ken

  • web20blog_org

    A great list. I will be sure to floss from now on. Maybe another is not blogging. I have seen some companies say they will start blogging, but instead they just put up a corporate message and call it blog. Have you seen that too?-Ken

    • Oh yes. I've seen some corporate blogs that have six posts in the last two years. That's no more effective that quarterly updates to your website, which isn't effective in engaging or attracting an audience either.

  • Great insight. I've been working on becoming a more consistent blogger and this really helps. Plus it keeps my teeth nice and white!

  • Great insight. I've been working on becoming a more consistent blogger and this really helps. Plus it keeps my teeth nice and white!

  • Great insight. I've been working on becoming a more consistent blogger and this really helps. Plus it keeps my teeth nice and white!

    • Doing what I can for toothy smiles and fresh breath.

  • Thanks!

  • Thanks!

  • As expected, excellent advice Mr. Baer. My personal blog was eight years baked before I found my true voice. As soon as I did, I switched to SME and rode the wave. Made all the difference in the world. You rock. Thanks for stopping by.

  • As expected, excellent advice Mr. Baer. My personal blog was eight years baked before I found my true voice. As soon as I did, I switched to SME and rode the wave. Made all the difference in the world. You rock. Thanks for stopping by.

  • Great tips!

  • Great tips!

  • Great tips!

  • Thanks for the thoughts, Bryan. Points agreed. Appreciate the participation.

  • Thanks for the thoughts, Bryan. Points agreed. Appreciate the participation.

  • I'll take a stab at #10. Promoting Your Blog Before You Realize What It's About.

    I've been advising folks to NOT promote their blog outside of “real” friends and family for the first 90 days. It takes a while to find your voice, and if you start telling people what your blog is about from day one, you're going to have to go back and change it because your community will eventually influence what you niche is.

    Plus, writing 10 posts about a topic is one thing. Writing 200 is something totally different.

    Work on your content and your voice for a while, and then worry about promotion. If you write some killer stuff at the beginning that didn't get an exposure because you were in quiet mode, you can always re-publish it later (provided it's not time-sensitive material).

  • I'll take a stab at #10. Promoting Your Blog Before You Realize What It's About.

    I've been advising folks to NOT promote their blog outside of “real” friends and family for the first 90 days. It takes a while to find your voice, and if you start telling people what your blog is about from day one, you're going to have to go back and change it because your community will eventually influence what you niche is.

    Plus, writing 10 posts about a topic is one thing. Writing 200 is something totally different.

    Work on your content and your voice for a while, and then worry about promotion. If you write some killer stuff at the beginning that didn't get an exposure because you were in quiet mode, you can always re-publish it later (provided it's not time-sensitive material).

  • I'll take a stab at #10. Promoting Your Blog Before You Realize What It's About.

    I've been advising folks to NOT promote their blog outside of “real” friends and family for the first 90 days. It takes a while to find your voice, and if you start telling people what your blog is about from day one, you're going to have to go back and change it because your community will eventually influence what you niche is.

    Plus, writing 10 posts about a topic is one thing. Writing 200 is something totally different.

    Work on your content and your voice for a while, and then worry about promotion. If you write some killer stuff at the beginning that didn't get an exposure because you were in quiet mode, you can always re-publish it later (provided it's not time-sensitive material).

    • As expected, excellent advice Mr. Baer. My personal blog was eight years baked before I found my true voice. As soon as I did, I switched to SME and rode the wave. Made all the difference in the world. You rock. Thanks for stopping by.

  • Good post Jason. As a relatively new blogger, I'm happy to see that I'm at least going about things in the right way. For a #10, I think someone mentioned this already but just wanted to reiterate that making your blog is a slow burn and not a flash fire. At Watercooler we get a little frustrated at times that we may be the only ones reading our blog. But we're going to keep plugging away confident that if the content is good, they will come.

  • Good post Jason. As a relatively new blogger, I'm happy to see that I'm at least going about things in the right way. For a #10, I think someone mentioned this already but just wanted to reiterate that making your blog is a slow burn and not a flash fire. At Watercooler we get a little frustrated at times that we may be the only ones reading our blog. But we're going to keep plugging away confident that if the content is good, they will come.

  • Good post Jason. As a relatively new blogger, I'm happy to see that I'm at least going about things in the right way. For a #10, I think someone mentioned this already but just wanted to reiterate that making your blog is a slow burn and not a flash fire. At Watercooler we get a little frustrated at times that we may be the only ones reading our blog. But we're going to keep plugging away confident that if the content is good, they will come.

    • Thanks for the thoughts, Bryan. Points agreed. Appreciate the participation.

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  • Good point. It's human nature for bloggers to get excited about milestones in subscribers or comments or unique visitors. But you're right. No one other than them care. I tell my wife because I need to tell someone. She doesn't understand the numbers or care at all but at least I've gotten it out of my system so I don't seem like I'm bragging to anyone. Nice add, my friend.

  • Good point. It's human nature for bloggers to get excited about milestones in subscribers or comments or unique visitors. But you're right. No one other than them care. I tell my wife because I need to tell someone. She doesn't understand the numbers or care at all but at least I've gotten it out of my system so I don't seem like I'm bragging to anyone. Nice add, my friend.

  • Great post Jason. I would add another one. Don't brag about how many readers or comments you are attracting. You may be excited by the 20 comments your blog post has received, but no one else is. That is always a turnoff for me.

  • Great post Jason. I would add another one. Don't brag about how many readers or comments you are attracting. You may be excited by the 20 comments your blog post has received, but no one else is. That is always a turnoff for me.

  • Great post Jason. I would add another one. Don't brag about how many readers or comments you are attracting. You may be excited by the 20 comments your blog post has received, but no one else is. That is always a turnoff for me.

    • Good point. It's human nature for bloggers to get excited about milestones in subscribers or comments or unique visitors. But you're right. No one other than them care. I tell my wife because I need to tell someone. She doesn't understand the numbers or care at all but at least I've gotten it out of my system so I don't seem like I'm bragging to anyone. Nice add, my friend.

  • Well done, Melanie. Another great tip. I went through two designs before I was happy with SME and both of the previous ones I should have never launched. It should have gone live when I was happy with it, but you live and learn.

    Great input.

    Thanks!

  • Well done, Melanie. Another great tip. I went through two designs before I was happy with SME and both of the previous ones I should have never launched. It should have gone live when I was happy with it, but you live and learn.

    Great input.

    Thanks!

  • Mistake #12: Putting your house on the market before you've tidied it up. Don't start promoting your blog until it's ready to share.

    That means before you start promoting: Make sure your blog design doesn't stink of amateurism (e.g., default theme, broken graphics, etc). Have more than a few quality posts up so your visitors know you're serious. Don't allow spam and pingbacks to dominate the “discussion” in your comments section under the mistaken belief that it makes you look more popular than you are. Etc.

    First impressions matter. If you promote too soon, the traffic you do drum up won't return and you'll have taken steps backwards not forwards.

  • Mistake #12: Putting your house on the market before you've tidied it up. Don't start promoting your blog until it's ready to share.

    That means before you start promoting: Make sure your blog design doesn't stink of amateurism (e.g., default theme, broken graphics, etc). Have more than a few quality posts up so your visitors know you're serious. Don't allow spam and pingbacks to dominate the “discussion” in your comments section under the mistaken belief that it makes you look more popular than you are. Etc.

    First impressions matter. If you promote too soon, the traffic you do drum up won't return and you'll have taken steps backwards not forwards.

  • Mistake #12: Putting your house on the market before you've tidied it up. Don't start promoting your blog until it's ready to share.

    That means before you start promoting: Make sure your blog design doesn't stink of amateurism (e.g., default theme, broken graphics, etc). Have more than a few quality posts up so your visitors know you're serious. Don't allow spam and pingbacks to dominate the “discussion” in your comments section under the mistaken belief that it makes you look more popular than you are. Etc.

    First impressions matter. If you promote too soon, the traffic you do drum up won't return and you'll have taken steps backwards not forwards.

    • Well done, Melanie. Another great tip. I went through two designs before I was happy with SME and both of the previous ones I should have never launched. It should have gone live when I was happy with it, but you live and learn.

      Great input.

      Thanks!

  • Pingback: 10 Mistakes for New Bloggers to Avoid When Promoting - Blog Forum - Bloggeries()

  • Amen, my friend. Thanks for the input. Well said.

  • Amen, my friend. Thanks for the input. Well said.

  • No more than I appreciate you reading and commenting. Thank you.

  • No more than I appreciate you reading and commenting. Thank you.

  • Excellent add, Mark. Just another reason why your blog and influence continues to grow. Keep up the great work, my friend.

  • Excellent add, Mark. Just another reason why your blog and influence continues to grow. Keep up the great work, my friend.

  • Thanks, Mike. And your dentist thanks you. Heh.

  • Thanks, Mike. And your dentist thanks you. Heh.

  • Good list, Jason – Thanks! As a newbie, I must admit moving the needle – is hard!

    But the spikes do happen when you're thanking tribe members for inspiration. Seems like social media folks are like folks everywhere – they like to be flattered.

    But I will say that social media people can smell the BS better than most – so be sure you are sincere!

    @chrismingryan

  • Good list, Jason – Thanks! As a newbie, I must admit moving the needle – is hard!

    But the spikes do happen when you're thanking tribe members for inspiration. Seems like social media folks are like folks everywhere – they like to be flattered.

    But I will say that social media people can smell the BS better than most – so be sure you are sincere!

    @chrismingryan

  • Good list, Jason – Thanks! As a newbie, I must admit moving the needle – is hard!

    But the spikes do happen when you're thanking tribe members for inspiration. Seems like social media folks are like folks everywhere – they like to be flattered.

    But I will say that social media people can smell the BS better than most – so be sure you are sincere!

    @chrismingryan

    • Amen, my friend. Thanks for the input. Well said.

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  • you had me at ‘don’t be a dick’. good sound advice.

  • This is a hugely helpful list. I started blogging a few months ago and I plan to keep this all in mind. Thanks for taking the time to think of an extra few to add on – all of these make perfect sense but aren't immediately obvious.

    Always appreciate your advice, Jason

  • This is a hugely helpful list. I started blogging a few months ago and I plan to keep this all in mind. Thanks for taking the time to think of an extra few to add on – all of these make perfect sense but aren't immediately obvious.

    Always appreciate your advice, Jason

  • This is a hugely helpful list. I started blogging a few months ago and I plan to keep this all in mind. Thanks for taking the time to think of an extra few to add on – all of these make perfect sense but aren't immediately obvious.

    Always appreciate your advice, Jason

    • No more than I appreciate you reading and commenting. Thank you.

  • #10 (or #11 if someone got there first):

    Giving up too soon (note: this is not contrary to the top 9!)

    As most of us know from experience, it takes time to establish yourself as a valuable resource. It can takes weeks, months, even years of work to get on the radar scope for many people. There are a lot of good blogs and good people out there: it takes time for the word to spread about you.

    Marketing (let's be honest here) is work and sometimes it's very hard work with little short-term payback. If you understand that it's a time consuming, hard thing to do at times, then you might be less tempted to quit.

    The ratio of abandoned to active blogs (100:1?) shows that there are a lot of people who don't stick to it for the long term. Granted, perhaps a lot of those blogs and bloggers didn't have the same ambition, talent, and perseverance to keep working away. Maybe some had intentionally short lifespans. But a lot of people probably gave up when they discovered that the cost/benefit ratio wasn't working for them, especially if they weren't building much of an audience.

    However, I'll be that some of those blogs could have achieved a greater level of success if they just kept trying and got smarter about their work.

    I've been working hard at this for about a year and I'm starting to see signs of building momentum for my own blog. After awhile it seems like less effort is required to keep things going and not as much effort required to move even faster or farther.

    But you've got to make friends, support other people, and show commitment.

    Food for thought.

  • #10 (or #11 if someone got there first):

    Giving up too soon (note: this is not contrary to the top 9!)

    As most of us know from experience, it takes time to establish yourself as a valuable resource. It can takes weeks, months, even years of work to get on the radar scope for many people. There are a lot of good blogs and good people out there: it takes time for the word to spread about you.

    Marketing (let's be honest here) is work and sometimes it's very hard work with little short-term payback. If you understand that it's a time consuming, hard thing to do at times, then you might be less tempted to quit.

    The ratio of abandoned to active blogs (100:1?) shows that there are a lot of people who don't stick to it for the long term. Granted, perhaps a lot of those blogs and bloggers didn't have the same ambition, talent, and perseverance to keep working away. Maybe some had intentionally short lifespans. But a lot of people probably gave up when they discovered that the cost/benefit ratio wasn't working for them, especially if they weren't building much of an audience.

    However, I'll be that some of those blogs could have achieved a greater level of success if they just kept trying and got smarter about their work.

    I've been working hard at this for about a year and I'm starting to see signs of building momentum for my own blog. After awhile it seems like less effort is required to keep things going and not as much effort required to move even faster or farther.

    But you've got to make friends, support other people, and show commitment.

    Food for thought.

  • #10 (or #11 if someone got there first):

    Giving up too soon (note: this is not contrary to the top 9!)

    As most of us know from experience, it takes time to establish yourself as a valuable resource. It can takes weeks, months, even years of work to get on the radar scope for many people. There are a lot of good blogs and good people out there: it takes time for the word to spread about you.

    Marketing (let's be honest here) is work and sometimes it's very hard work with little short-term payback. If you understand that it's a time consuming, hard thing to do at times, then you might be less tempted to quit.

    The ratio of abandoned to active blogs (100:1?) shows that there are a lot of people who don't stick to it for the long term. Granted, perhaps a lot of those blogs and bloggers didn't have the same ambition, talent, and perseverance to keep working away. Maybe some had intentionally short lifespans. But a lot of people probably gave up when they discovered that the cost/benefit ratio wasn't working for them, especially if they weren't building much of an audience.

    However, I'll be that some of those blogs could have achieved a greater level of success if they just kept trying and got smarter about their work.

    I've been working hard at this for about a year and I'm starting to see signs of building momentum for my own blog. After awhile it seems like less effort is required to keep things going and not as much effort required to move even faster or farther.

    But you've got to make friends, support other people, and show commitment.

    Food for thought.

    • Excellent add, Mark. Just another reason why your blog and influence continues to grow. Keep up the great work, my friend.

  • Thanks for a great list. It's got food for thought, not only for new bloggers, but for “old” ones as well. I see several mistakes that I have made. But I did floss.

  • Thanks for a great list. It's got food for thought, not only for new bloggers, but for “old” ones as well. I see several mistakes that I have made. But I did floss.

  • Thanks for a great list. It's got food for thought, not only for new bloggers, but for “old” ones as well. I see several mistakes that I have made. But I did floss.

    • Thanks, Mike. And your dentist thanks you. Heh.

  • Another good add. Thanks Tom.

  • Another good add. Thanks Tom.

  • Thanks Craig. You're right that the slow build is much better than the big pop, certainly with regard to building influence. Thanks for coming back so often.

  • Thanks Craig. You're right that the slow build is much better than the big pop, certainly with regard to building influence. Thanks for coming back so often.

  • Great thought, B.J. That should have been No. 10. Nice add.

  • Great thought, B.J. That should have been No. 10. Nice add.

  • Thanks for reading!

  • Thanks for reading!

  • Yeah. I'm happy to provide influence over people's kids. Heh.

  • Yeah. I'm happy to provide influence over people's kids. Heh.

  • Thanks Frank. I'm the dental hygienist of social media, I guess.

  • Thanks Frank. I'm the dental hygienist of social media, I guess.

  • Thanks, Stuart. I too had to make some mistake and learn in the early days. That's how it always works. Thanks for the continued commenting.

  • Thanks, Stuart. I too had to make some mistake and learn in the early days. That's how it always works. Thanks for the continued commenting.

  • Hi Jason:

    #10 might be to have original ideas and thoughts. Don't just riff on other people's ideas and material. (#11 – NO MORE 22 STEPS TO . . .)

    TO'B

  • Hi Jason:

    #10 might be to have original ideas and thoughts. Don't just riff on other people's ideas and material. (#11 – NO MORE 22 STEPS TO . . .)

    TO'B

  • Hi Jason:

    #10 might be to have original ideas and thoughts. Don't just riff on other people's ideas and material. (#11 – NO MORE 22 STEPS TO . . .)

    TO'B

  • Something I have learned about social media in the past 5 months I've been involved is that it deals with a lot of karma. It is a slow long process to build influence and try to gain respect online. If you go about it the right way, and share others comments, blogs, posts and are eager to learn, it can only benefit you in the long run. Good tips, I'm thinking of starting my own personal movie blog with a buddy who is new to social media and have already sent this out to him.

    Craig
    http://www.budgetpulse.com

  • Something I have learned about social media in the past 5 months I've been involved is that it deals with a lot of karma. It is a slow long process to build influence and try to gain respect online. If you go about it the right way, and share others comments, blogs, posts and are eager to learn, it can only benefit you in the long run. Good tips, I'm thinking of starting my own personal movie blog with a buddy who is new to social media and have already sent this out to him.

    Craig
    http://www.budgetpulse.com

  • Something I have learned about social media in the past 5 months I've been involved is that it deals with a lot of karma. It is a slow long process to build influence and try to gain respect online. If you go about it the right way, and share others comments, blogs, posts and are eager to learn, it can only benefit you in the long run. Good tips, I'm thinking of starting my own personal movie blog with a buddy who is new to social media and have already sent this out to him.

    Craig
    http://www.budgetpulse.com

    • Thanks Craig. You're right that the slow build is much better than the big pop, certainly with regard to building influence. Thanks for coming back so often.

  • Thanks. Good info. I've made a few of these mistakes (including forgetting about flossing).

    One other one mistake to consider: Being impatient. It may take a while to reach whatever goals you have established, so don't expect to be an overnight sensation or must-read.

  • Thanks. Good info. I've made a few of these mistakes (including forgetting about flossing).

    One other one mistake to consider: Being impatient. It may take a while to reach whatever goals you have established, so don't expect to be an overnight sensation or must-read.

  • Thanks. Good info. I've made a few of these mistakes (including forgetting about flossing).

    One other one mistake to consider: Being impatient. It may take a while to reach whatever goals you have established, so don't expect to be an overnight sensation or must-read.

    • Great thought, B.J. That should have been No. 10. Nice add.

  • Jason,

    I agree with you think 4 and 7 are the most important it seems many of the most read bloggers invest lots of time in face-to-face networking. Good list thanks for sharing.

  • Jason,

    I agree with you think 4 and 7 are the most important it seems many of the most read bloggers invest lots of time in face-to-face networking. Good list thanks for sharing.

  • Jason,

    I agree with you think 4 and 7 are the most important it seems many of the most read bloggers invest lots of time in face-to-face networking. Good list thanks for sharing.

  • Thanks Jason. Great advice. I'll share #10 with my kids to show them what can happen if you don't floss!!

  • Thanks Jason. Great advice. I'll share #10 with my kids to show them what can happen if you don't floss!!

  • Thanks Jason. Great advice. I'll share #10 with my kids to show them what can happen if you don't floss!!

    • Yeah. I'm happy to provide influence over people's kids. Heh.

  • I think #10 is fantastic. Don't leave chunks of crap in the teeth of your post! Great work, Jason.

  • I think #10 is fantastic. Don't leave chunks of crap in the teeth of your post! Great work, Jason.

  • I think #10 is fantastic. Don't leave chunks of crap in the teeth of your post! Great work, Jason.

    • Thanks Frank. I'm the dental hygienist of social media, I guess.

  • When I first began my career in social media, I made two of those hallmark mistakes when promoting my brand (No, I definitely flossed). I definitely promoted my product to heavily while not doing enough in return. Generosity is one of the hallmarks of successful social media strategy…I didn't get the memo until I had been in the game for a month or so (and I was wondering why my subs to digg were only getting 2 diggs :) ) I also am working on branching out into more face to face work (I've used the phone a lot more…but due to distance with a lot of my friends am having trouble with the face aspect) Great advice, Jason.

  • When I first began my career in social media, I made two of those hallmark mistakes when promoting my brand (No, I definitely flossed). I definitely promoted my product to heavily while not doing enough in return. Generosity is one of the hallmarks of successful social media strategy…I didn't get the memo until I had been in the game for a month or so (and I was wondering why my subs to digg were only getting 2 diggs :) ) I also am working on branching out into more face to face work (I've used the phone a lot more…but due to distance with a lot of my friends am having trouble with the face aspect) Great advice, Jason.

  • When I first began my career in social media, I made two of those hallmark mistakes when promoting my brand (No, I definitely flossed). I definitely promoted my product to heavily while not doing enough in return. Generosity is one of the hallmarks of successful social media strategy…I didn't get the memo until I had been in the game for a month or so (and I was wondering why my subs to digg were only getting 2 diggs :) ) I also am working on branching out into more face to face work (I've used the phone a lot more…but due to distance with a lot of my friends am having trouble with the face aspect) Great advice, Jason.

    • Thanks, Stuart. I too had to make some mistake and learn in the early days. That's how it always works. Thanks for the continued commenting.