Advice For Social Media Consultants: Escape The Echo Chamber
Advice For Social Media Consultants: Escape The Echo Chamber
by

As much fun as I had at Blog World & New Media Expo last weekend, I came away thinking I was talking to the wrong audience. Not that the people who took the time to attend the panels on which I spoke didn’t energize me, or that I didn’t serve as a valid speaker for what they were hoping to explore or learn, but blogging (read: “Social Media”) conferences, to a degree, are a bit of an echo chamber. A bunch of social media folks got together to yuck it up about how social media is cool and, “here’s how I do it … how do you do it?” Yes, some new to the game learn a good bit. Yes, we challenge each other with some critical thinking and feedback, but we’re essentially selling snake oil to the snake oil industry.

No, social media isn’t snake oil. It’s an expression. Bear with me.

Don’t get me wrong, I loved Blog World. I love SXSW. I’ve been to a few other social media industry conferences and have enjoyed them immensely. But the future of successful social media hinges upon us escaping the echo chamber and taking our knowledge and understanding of the social web to the people who don’t get it.

At the end of the month, I’m speaking at my second Public Relations Society of America conference this year. As you’re probably aware, I think public relations professionals are severely lacking in social media savvy and way behind in understanding and implementing best practices in something they should own. Social media, in my mind, is an online extension of public relations and soon will be considered simply a part of good PR. Yet PR pros everywhere are vomiting crappy press releases and irrelevant pitches and acting like social media is something the IT guys should do.

I was recently part of a Social Media Club Louisville educational event where 80 business men and women showed up to learn the basics of social media. Michelle Jones, Nick Huhn, Brendan Jackson, Aaron Marshall and I were proud to pull back the curtain a bit and introduce these folks to what social media is and how they should start thinking about it. On Oct. 14, I’ll present a similar talk to the Master of Business Online boot camp in Indianapolis, a seminar aimed at traditional businesses looking to understand more about online marketing and communications.

But I’m not doing enough. And neither are many of you.

I exchanged emails recently with Drew McLellan of Drew’s Marketing Minute and expressed my thought that we should stop talking to ourselves and start talking to the rest of the world. It’s no surprise that Drew’s ahead of the game. Last week he presented to a group of economic planners for cities. This week he hits rural electric co-op presidents. Yet more reason if you’re not following him on Twitter or subscribing to his blog, you should.

So consider this a challenge, both to you and to myself. As we move forward as social media practitioners, thinkers or whatever you want to call us, let us take pause with our outreach, stop contributing to the echo chamber and start teaching the rest of the marketplace how the social web can compliment their communications efforts. (Notice I didn’t say, “how the social web can revolutionize their business,” or, “miraculously help you kick your competition’s ass,” or some other such fallacy. Don’t set them up to fail. Set them up to embrace and utilize social media effectively.)

I’ll certainly continue to attend SXSW and Blog World & New Media Expo because coming together as an industry to share and learn together has inherent value. But I’m going to try to focus more of my conference and speaking opportunities on those beyond our little bubble. If you do the same, social media has a chance of growing beyond it, too.

Now let’s roll up our sleeves and get to work. What industries, conferences, events and professions should we target? Feel free to add links to events and dates in the comments and we’ll start reaching out in hopes of introducing social media to them soon.

IMAGE: “Soap Bubble 3” by Lena01 on Stock.Xchng.

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  • Jason,

    I really agree with you. Its one of the reasons I chose to not go to BlogWorld this year. I went to WOMM-u expecting more, but frankly the gap in knowledge between the snakes and, as they say in this election cycle “Main Street,” makes it hard to do conferences that well. Though, like you, I very much enjoyed meeting and hanging out with people I don't get to see often.

    This is exactly why I did the two 101 programs this month for the Colorado Business Marketing Association. I think that more needs to be done at a local level to share knowledge and ideas.

  • Jason,

    I really agree with you. Its one of the reasons I chose to not go to BlogWorld this year. I went to WOMM-u expecting more, but frankly the gap in knowledge between the snakes and, as they say in this election cycle “Main Street,” makes it hard to do conferences that well. Though, like you, I very much enjoyed meeting and hanging out with people I don't get to see often.

    This is exactly why I did the two 101 programs this month for the Colorado Business Marketing Association. I think that more needs to be done at a local level to share knowledge and ideas.

  • Jason,

    I really agree with you. Its one of the reasons I chose to not go to BlogWorld this year. I went to WOMM-u expecting more, but frankly the gap in knowledge between the snakes and, as they say in this election cycle “Main Street,” makes it hard to do conferences that well. Though, like you, I very much enjoyed meeting and hanging out with people I don't get to see often.

    This is exactly why I did the two 101 programs this month for the Colorado Business Marketing Association. I think that more needs to be done at a local level to share knowledge and ideas.

  • Jason,

    I really agree with you. Its one of the reasons I chose to not go to BlogWorld this year. I went to WOMM-u expecting more, but frankly the gap in knowledge between the snakes and, as they say in this election cycle “Main Street,” makes it hard to do conferences that well. Though, like you, I very much enjoyed meeting and hanging out with people I don't get to see often.

    This is exactly why I did the two 101 programs this month for the Colorado Business Marketing Association. I think that more needs to be done at a local level to share knowledge and ideas.

  • Hey Jason!

    Well, I've recently reached out to several of the campus groups at my alma mater (UCLA) to talk to them about social media and how they might improve their communication and outreach efforts to the student population and their members. I didn't approach them on a “hire me” basis (though speaking to them and engaging them will help me out in my own endeavors). Frankly, I think that there's A LOT that they can do if they started to use some of these social media tools in their communication efforts.

    Anyway, just sharing some of what I'm doing to evangelize social media for what I hope to be the greater good…

  • Hey Jason!

    Well, I've recently reached out to several of the campus groups at my alma mater (UCLA) to talk to them about social media and how they might improve their communication and outreach efforts to the student population and their members. I didn't approach them on a “hire me” basis (though speaking to them and engaging them will help me out in my own endeavors). Frankly, I think that there's A LOT that they can do if they started to use some of these social media tools in their communication efforts.

    Anyway, just sharing some of what I'm doing to evangelize social media for what I hope to be the greater good…

  • Hey Jason!

    Well, I've recently reached out to several of the campus groups at my alma mater (UCLA) to talk to them about social media and how they might improve their communication and outreach efforts to the student population and their members. I didn't approach them on a “hire me” basis (though speaking to them and engaging them will help me out in my own endeavors). Frankly, I think that there's A LOT that they can do if they started to use some of these social media tools in their communication efforts.

    Anyway, just sharing some of what I'm doing to evangelize social media for what I hope to be the greater good…

  • I've been rolling a response around in my head for a few days and came up with more of an echo to your thoughts on the echo chamber. Chris Brogan had a similar post the other day, too, likening SM tools to the telephone. http://www.chrisbrogan.com/social-media-tools-a

    I had a similar observation after returning from the New Media Expo last year. Seems like two things happen: we all get sucked into all the cool tools and lost sight of what they're supposed to do and, 2) we forget to let the rest of the world know why this is important. My post: http://blog.clearcastdigitalmedia.com/2008/10/e

  • I've been rolling a response around in my head for a few days and came up with more of an echo to your thoughts on the echo chamber. Chris Brogan had a similar post the other day, too, likening SM tools to the telephone. http://www.chrisbrogan.com/social-media-tools-a

    I had a similar observation after returning from the New Media Expo last year. Seems like two things happen: we all get sucked into all the cool tools and lost sight of what they're supposed to do and, 2) we forget to let the rest of the world know why this is important. My post: http://blog.clearcastdigitalmedia.com/2008/10/e

  • I've been rolling a response around in my head for a few days and came up with more of an echo to your thoughts on the echo chamber. Chris Brogan had a similar post the other day, too, likening SM tools to the telephone. http://www.chrisbrogan.com/social-media-tools-a

    I had a similar observation after returning from the New Media Expo last year. Seems like two things happen: we all get sucked into all the cool tools and lost sight of what they're supposed to do and, 2) we forget to let the rest of the world know why this is important. My post: http://blog.clearcastdigitalmedia.com/2008/10/e

  • It's almost as if you were in my class on Friday, Jason.

    I warned off public relations professionals and communicators from becoming so entrenched in field associations that they forget to participate in industry associations representing their clients and employers. And I reminded them that as much as the “social media” experts sometimes believe they are driving the industry, I continually learn that we represent only a fraction of a fraction that makes up business employing social media.

    Great observations and it was good to see you in Vegas.

    Best,
    Rich

  • It's almost as if you were in my class on Friday, Jason.

    I warned off public relations professionals and communicators from becoming so entrenched in field associations that they forget to participate in industry associations representing their clients and employers. And I reminded them that as much as the “social media” experts sometimes believe they are driving the industry, I continually learn that we represent only a fraction of a fraction that makes up business employing social media.

    Great observations and it was good to see you in Vegas.

    Best,
    Rich

  • It's almost as if you were in my class on Friday, Jason.

    I warned off public relations professionals and communicators from becoming so entrenched in field associations that they forget to participate in industry associations representing their clients and employers. And I reminded them that as much as the “social media” experts sometimes believe they are driving the industry, I continually learn that we represent only a fraction of a fraction that makes up business employing social media.

    Great observations and it was good to see you in Vegas.

    Best,
    Rich

  • Sure Jason! I thought of one more thing. I think helping PR staff learn about social media, but also help them learn how to express the need for it to decision makers in the organization. I know a lot of PR people who want to learn about social media, but their organization doesn't understand the importance of social media to their organization. Also helping them explain what are the appropriate PR avenues on social media apps is key too. I have seen executives telling their staff- we need a Facebook page, but the staff either not understanding that it's not appropriate for their organization, or, the staff does know it's not appropriate, but doesn't have the language to move the decision maker. I realize their is some personal responsibility necessary on both parties sides.

  • Sure Jason! I thought of one more thing. I think helping PR staff learn about social media, but also help them learn how to express the need for it to decision makers in the organization. I know a lot of PR people who want to learn about social media, but their organization doesn't understand the importance of social media to their organization. Also helping them explain what are the appropriate PR avenues on social media apps is key too. I have seen executives telling their staff- we need a Facebook page, but the staff either not understanding that it's not appropriate for their organization, or, the staff does know it's not appropriate, but doesn't have the language to move the decision maker. I realize their is some personal responsibility necessary on both parties sides.

  • Erica

    Will do. My first project is my colleagues – they have to understand this stuff – it's the future of what we do!

  • Erica

    Will do. My first project is my colleagues – they have to understand this stuff – it's the future of what we do!

  • Hi–

    I've received your message, and I'm glad you've taken the time to write.

    If your message is URGENT, and needs IMMEDIATE action, please use the
    contact page link below.

    https://awayfind.com/chrisbrogan

    Otherwise, please note that I'll contact you as soon as possible, and
    I'm grateful for your time and attention.

    Chris Brogan
    [chrisbrogan.com]

  • Hi–

    I've received your message, and I'm glad you've taken the time to write.

    If your message is URGENT, and needs IMMEDIATE action, please use the
    contact page link below.

    https://awayfind.com/chrisbrogan

    Otherwise, please note that I'll contact you as soon as possible, and
    I'm grateful for your time and attention.

    Chris Brogan
    [chrisbrogan.com]

  • You are a man in desperate need of time and sleep management.

    In the flesh – check. I accept your additional challenge, though I believe that was implied in my post. You're right – off-line discussions of these topics are much more powerful to those who don't understand them in the first place.

    And I'll never leave the fishbowl because I'd miss the crap out of you.

  • You are a man in desperate need of time and sleep management.

    In the flesh – check. I accept your additional challenge, though I believe that was implied in my post. You're right – off-line discussions of these topics are much more powerful to those who don't understand them in the first place.

    And I'll never leave the fishbowl because I'd miss the crap out of you.

  • First of all, Des Walsh commented on my blog. Made my day. Thanks for coming and contributing.

    And yes, you're right. Hopefully, I haven't left the impression I think we should walk away from that middle ground of folks who get it but are thirsting for more. After all, those are my peeps – the folks that energize and encourage me and make me think I have some greater purpose in this big world, to coach, educate, enlighten and so on.

    I did see the furious note-taking and had countless conversations that showed me how powerfun BWE and other similar conferences can be to the attendees. I'll never walk away from that crowd because they are the social media thinkers and do-ers who will lead us tomorrow.

    Hopefully, I communicated well that we just should be mindful that growth won't happen if we don't look beyond the it-getters and enthusiasts. As consumers, we owe it to each other to push for social media understanding and thinking in every company and brand out there. As people, we owe it to each other to show relatives, friends and co-workers how powerful these tools are in connecting us with people we knew, know or want to.

    I look at folks like Aaron Marshall (@CHURCHSMO) who just beams with enthusiasm about showing folks how to do simple things like filter email or set up a Google Alerts and think, “That's what we need to do more of. The world will be better for it.”

    I, too, learned a great deal at BWE. We all did. We can't walk away from each other. But we need to also ensure there's more of us to talk to by growing the footprint and circle. Hopefully that point made it across.

    And it was a honor and pleasure to meet you, Mr. Walsh. I'm very much looking forward to our coffee and chat.

  • First of all, Des Walsh commented on my blog. Made my day. Thanks for coming and contributing.

    And yes, you're right. Hopefully, I haven't left the impression I think we should walk away from that middle ground of folks who get it but are thirsting for more. After all, those are my peeps – the folks that energize and encourage me and make me think I have some greater purpose in this big world, to coach, educate, enlighten and so on.

    I did see the furious note-taking and had countless conversations that showed me how powerfun BWE and other similar conferences can be to the attendees. I'll never walk away from that crowd because they are the social media thinkers and do-ers who will lead us tomorrow.

    Hopefully, I communicated well that we just should be mindful that growth won't happen if we don't look beyond the it-getters and enthusiasts. As consumers, we owe it to each other to push for social media understanding and thinking in every company and brand out there. As people, we owe it to each other to show relatives, friends and co-workers how powerful these tools are in connecting us with people we knew, know or want to.

    I look at folks like Aaron Marshall (@CHURCHSMO) who just beams with enthusiasm about showing folks how to do simple things like filter email or set up a Google Alerts and think, “That's what we need to do more of. The world will be better for it.”

    I, too, learned a great deal at BWE. We all did. We can't walk away from each other. But we need to also ensure there's more of us to talk to by growing the footprint and circle. Hopefully that point made it across.

    And it was a honor and pleasure to meet you, Mr. Walsh. I'm very much looking forward to our coffee and chat.

  • Great feedback Deb. I'm looking forward to doing more and more of that in the coming months.

  • Great feedback Deb. I'm looking forward to doing more and more of that in the coming months.

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  • It's 3:42AM and I can't sleep. Part of why I can't sleep is that I'm designing a new slide deck to be part of a conversation I'm going to have with IT professionals about all the various things social media is not. I also wrote five or so blog posts. I'm also writing in my book.

    In pretty much all those cases, I'm writing to groups of people who will likely find me via the web.

    So, to the challenge (and I intend to find my own ways to go along with your schemes, Falls), I add this: find ways to do it in the flesh in local areas, offline, and in face to face ways. Even if we're going to educate people on these new tools for collaboration and communication, we have to work a little extra to put them in the hands of people who can use them.

    My first move: next Tuesday, I'm speaking to PR students at Boston University. I'm going to share what I know about PR from the future, so that they can marry that to their traditional learning.

    Really great post, mister. And hey, I'm really glad I saw you there at the show, and that we got to go to our special place. Hope I see you again somewhere inside the fishbowl.

  • It's 3:42AM and I can't sleep. Part of why I can't sleep is that I'm designing a new slide deck to be part of a conversation I'm going to have with IT professionals about all the various things social media is not. I also wrote five or so blog posts. I'm also writing in my book.

    In pretty much all those cases, I'm writing to groups of people who will likely find me via the web.

    So, to the challenge (and I intend to find my own ways to go along with your schemes, Falls), I add this: find ways to do it in the flesh in local areas, offline, and in face to face ways. Even if we're going to educate people on these new tools for collaboration and communication, we have to work a little extra to put them in the hands of people who can use them.

    My first move: next Tuesday, I'm speaking to PR students at Boston University. I'm going to share what I know about PR from the future, so that they can marry that to their traditional learning.

    Really great post, mister. And hey, I'm really glad I saw you there at the show, and that we got to go to our special place. Hope I see you again somewhere inside the fishbowl.

  • It's 3:42AM and I can't sleep. Part of why I can't sleep is that I'm designing a new slide deck to be part of a conversation I'm going to have with IT professionals about all the various things social media is not. I also wrote five or so blog posts. I'm also writing in my book.

    In pretty much all those cases, I'm writing to groups of people who will likely find me via the web.

    So, to the challenge (and I intend to find my own ways to go along with your schemes, Falls), I add this: find ways to do it in the flesh in local areas, offline, and in face to face ways. Even if we're going to educate people on these new tools for collaboration and communication, we have to work a little extra to put them in the hands of people who can use them.

    My first move: next Tuesday, I'm speaking to PR students at Boston University. I'm going to share what I know about PR from the future, so that they can marry that to their traditional learning.

    Really great post, mister. And hey, I'm really glad I saw you there at the show, and that we got to go to our special place. Hope I see you again somewhere inside the fishbowl.

    • You are a man in desperate need of time and sleep management.

      In the flesh – check. I accept your additional challenge, though I believe that was implied in my post. You're right – off-line discussions of these topics are much more powerful to those who don't understand them in the first place.

      And I'll never leave the fishbowl because I'd miss the crap out of you.

      • Hi–

        I've received your message, and I'm glad you've taken the time to write.

        If your message is URGENT, and needs IMMEDIATE action, please use the
        contact page link below.

        https://awayfind.com/chrisbrogan

        Otherwise, please note that I'll contact you as soon as possible, and
        I'm grateful for your time and attention.

        Chris Brogan
        [chrisbrogan.com]

  • Well yes, Jason, of course.

    You've certainly got me thinking about how to widen my perspective and look for broader audiences to evangelize.

    But I think you've set up a bit of a straw man here, haven't you? At least as far as BlogWorld 08 is concerned (and 07 for that matter).

    Because from what I saw and folks I spoke to, there were a lot of people there who would not pretend to have your level of knowledge and expertise and for whom BlogWorld was a terrific learning experience as well as a great “new networks/new friends” experience. And I suspect lots of those people don't get the opportunity to go to the industry conferences you and other thought leaders get to.

    It would be a shame if the newbies and the people like the guy I met from Montana with the nearest town 20 miles away came to BlogWorld and found that all the thought leaders were off talking to the electricity company execs. Or someone like the woman from a small town who is trying against great odds to find ways to persuade her employees to use new media and was looking for ideas and now knows there are people like you from whose work she can get ideas to test.

    Or other people who are just starting out to use blogging in their business and were hungry for knowledge and excited about all the information and ideas being shared.

    Did you see the furious note-taking that was going on in the sessions? Didn't look to me like everyone knowing it all.

    What if we saw events like BWE08 as a way some of us could have an opportunity to help the people who have already done the hard slog of learning how to blog and keep blogging, learning how to cope with blogger's block, learning about how to connect with others and actually become part of one or more of the conversations, but might not even know yet (or, hopefully, ever) what all this echo chamber talk is about? Isn't it a good thing to be sharing what comes naturally for you with them and giving them encouragement to keep on keeping on, to cope with the disappointment of not having monster traffic to their sites, of coping with the spouse or “friends” who tell them they are wasting their time?

    Can you tell I'm passionate about helping these people, mate? Well, I am, because I was one and still am in many ways.

    Of course there was some gemutlichkeit with people who know one another and enjoy one another's company, but with all due respect to Christina I don't get the kumbaya bit (unless the Godbloggers were doing that while the rest of us weren't watching).

    I know you are not telling your peers not to go to BlogWorld, SXSW etc, but – as I say – I believe there is a contribution element here that I am pretty sure you are not averse to.

    I learnt from sitting in on your panel. People told me they learnt from panels I was on.

    And I'm really pleased you are going to be at BWE next year. Maybe then we'll get to have a coffee and a chat :).

  • Well yes, Jason, of course.

    You've certainly got me thinking about how to widen my perspective and look for broader audiences to evangelize.

    But I think you've set up a bit of a straw man here, haven't you? At least as far as BlogWorld 08 is concerned (and 07 for that matter).

    Because from what I saw and folks I spoke to, there were a lot of people there who would not pretend to have your level of knowledge and expertise and for whom BlogWorld was a terrific learning experience as well as a great “new networks/new friends” experience. And I suspect lots of those people don't get the opportunity to go to the industry conferences you and other thought leaders get to.

    It would be a shame if the newbies and the people like the guy I met from Montana with the nearest town 20 miles away came to BlogWorld and found that all the thought leaders were off talking to the electricity company execs. Or someone like the woman from a small town who is trying against great odds to find ways to persuade her employees to use new media and was looking for ideas and now knows there are people like you from whose work she can get ideas to test.

    Or other people who are just starting out to use blogging in their business and were hungry for knowledge and excited about all the information and ideas being shared.

    Did you see the furious note-taking that was going on in the sessions? Didn't look to me like everyone knowing it all.

    What if we saw events like BWE08 as a way some of us could have an opportunity to help the people who have already done the hard slog of learning how to blog and keep blogging, learning how to cope with blogger's block, learning about how to connect with others and actually become part of one or more of the conversations, but might not even know yet (or, hopefully, ever) what all this echo chamber talk is about? Isn't it a good thing to be sharing what comes naturally for you with them and giving them encouragement to keep on keeping on, to cope with the disappointment of not having monster traffic to their sites, of coping with the spouse or “friends” who tell them they are wasting their time?

    Can you tell I'm passionate about helping these people, mate? Well, I am, because I was one and still am in many ways.

    Of course there was some gemutlichkeit with people who know one another and enjoy one another's company, but with all due respect to Christina I don't get the kumbaya bit (unless the Godbloggers were doing that while the rest of us weren't watching).

    I know you are not telling your peers not to go to BlogWorld, SXSW etc, but – as I say – I believe there is a contribution element here that I am pretty sure you are not averse to.

    I learnt from sitting in on your panel. People told me they learnt from panels I was on.

    And I'm really pleased you are going to be at BWE next year. Maybe then we'll get to have a coffee and a chat :).

  • Well yes, Jason, of course.

    You've certainly got me thinking about how to widen my perspective and look for broader audiences to evangelize.

    But I think you've set up a bit of a straw man here, haven't you? At least as far as BlogWorld 08 is concerned (and 07 for that matter).

    Because from what I saw and folks I spoke to, there were a lot of people there who would not pretend to have your level of knowledge and expertise and for whom BlogWorld was a terrific learning experience as well as a great “new networks/new friends” experience. And I suspect lots of those people don't get the opportunity to go to the industry conferences you and other thought leaders get to.

    It would be a shame if the newbies and the people like the guy I met from Montana with the nearest town 20 miles away came to BlogWorld and found that all the thought leaders were off talking to the electricity company execs. Or someone like the woman from a small town who is trying against great odds to find ways to persuade her employees to use new media and was looking for ideas and now knows there are people like you from whose work she can get ideas to test.

    Or other people who are just starting out to use blogging in their business and were hungry for knowledge and excited about all the information and ideas being shared.

    Did you see the furious note-taking that was going on in the sessions? Didn't look to me like everyone knowing it all.

    What if we saw events like BWE08 as a way some of us could have an opportunity to help the people who have already done the hard slog of learning how to blog and keep blogging, learning how to cope with blogger's block, learning about how to connect with others and actually become part of one or more of the conversations, but might not even know yet (or, hopefully, ever) what all this echo chamber talk is about? Isn't it a good thing to be sharing what comes naturally for you with them and giving them encouragement to keep on keeping on, to cope with the disappointment of not having monster traffic to their sites, of coping with the spouse or “friends” who tell them they are wasting their time?

    Can you tell I'm passionate about helping these people, mate? Well, I am, because I was one and still am in many ways.

    Of course there was some gemutlichkeit with people who know one another and enjoy one another's company, but with all due respect to Christina I don't get the kumbaya bit (unless the Godbloggers were doing that while the rest of us weren't watching).

    I know you are not telling your peers not to go to BlogWorld, SXSW etc, but – as I say – I believe there is a contribution element here that I am pretty sure you are not averse to.

    I learnt from sitting in on your panel. People told me they learnt from panels I was on.

    And I'm really pleased you are going to be at BWE next year. Maybe then we'll get to have a coffee and a chat :).

    • First of all, Des Walsh commented on my blog. Made my day. Thanks for coming and contributing.

      And yes, you're right. Hopefully, I haven't left the impression I think we should walk away from that middle ground of folks who get it but are thirsting for more. After all, those are my peeps – the folks that energize and encourage me and make me think I have some greater purpose in this big world, to coach, educate, enlighten and so on.

      I did see the furious note-taking and had countless conversations that showed me how powerfun BWE and other similar conferences can be to the attendees. I'll never walk away from that crowd because they are the social media thinkers and do-ers who will lead us tomorrow.

      Hopefully, I communicated well that we just should be mindful that growth won't happen if we don't look beyond the it-getters and enthusiasts. As consumers, we owe it to each other to push for social media understanding and thinking in every company and brand out there. As people, we owe it to each other to show relatives, friends and co-workers how powerful these tools are in connecting us with people we knew, know or want to.

      I look at folks like Aaron Marshall (@CHURCHSMO) who just beams with enthusiasm about showing folks how to do simple things like filter email or set up a Google Alerts and think, “That's what we need to do more of. The world will be better for it.”

      I, too, learned a great deal at BWE. We all did. We can't walk away from each other. But we need to also ensure there's more of us to talk to by growing the footprint and circle. Hopefully that point made it across.

      And it was a honor and pleasure to meet you, Mr. Walsh. I'm very much looking forward to our coffee and chat.

  • Thanks Jason! This is great. For as much as I love doing traditional media relations, I enjoy learning and teaching about social media even more. I have worked with and presented to economic development groups and I like that because: 1.) the audience is largely decision makers, 2.) you hit a wide range of industries, 3.) word of mouth travels quickly about your business and 4.) audience members kind of feed off of one another with their questions and answers. It's a lot of fun.

  • Thanks Jason! This is great. For as much as I love doing traditional media relations, I enjoy learning and teaching about social media even more. I have worked with and presented to economic development groups and I like that because: 1.) the audience is largely decision makers, 2.) you hit a wide range of industries, 3.) word of mouth travels quickly about your business and 4.) audience members kind of feed off of one another with their questions and answers. It's a lot of fun.

  • Thanks Jason! This is great. For as much as I love doing traditional media relations, I enjoy learning and teaching about social media even more. I have worked with and presented to economic development groups and I like that because: 1.) the audience is largely decision makers, 2.) you hit a wide range of industries, 3.) word of mouth travels quickly about your business and 4.) audience members kind of feed off of one another with their questions and answers. It's a lot of fun.

    • Great feedback Deb. I'm looking forward to doing more and more of that in the coming months.

      • Sure Jason! I thought of one more thing. I think helping PR staff learn about social media, but also help them learn how to express the need for it to decision makers in the organization. I know a lot of PR people who want to learn about social media, but their organization doesn't understand the importance of social media to their organization. Also helping them explain what are the appropriate PR avenues on social media apps is key too. I have seen executives telling their staff- we need a Facebook page, but the staff either not understanding that it's not appropriate for their organization, or, the staff does know it's not appropriate, but doesn't have the language to move the decision maker. I realize their is some personal responsibility necessary on both parties sides.

  • Jason,
    I think this is important because social media marketing is looking a little too insular these days. I've always advised that when deciding on conferences to attend you should go where the customers are rather than where your peers are. Even if you're not selling, you'll gain a perspective on the end-user POV rather than trade war stories.
    For example I went to WorldCom regional meeting because my customers are PR agencies. It gave me invaluable opportunities to talk about the business models agencies are building around social media, a subject everyone was eager to discuss.
    BTW, you should really do an SM2 demo- I think you'd be surprised how we stack up against the (friendly) competition…

  • Jason,
    I think this is important because social media marketing is looking a little too insular these days. I've always advised that when deciding on conferences to attend you should go where the customers are rather than where your peers are. Even if you're not selling, you'll gain a perspective on the end-user POV rather than trade war stories.
    For example I went to WorldCom regional meeting because my customers are PR agencies. It gave me invaluable opportunities to talk about the business models agencies are building around social media, a subject everyone was eager to discuss.
    BTW, you should really do an SM2 demo- I think you'd be surprised how we stack up against the (friendly) competition…

  • Jason,
    I think this is important because social media marketing is looking a little too insular these days. I've always advised that when deciding on conferences to attend you should go where the customers are rather than where your peers are. Even if you're not selling, you'll gain a perspective on the end-user POV rather than trade war stories.
    For example I went to WorldCom regional meeting because my customers are PR agencies. It gave me invaluable opportunities to talk about the business models agencies are building around social media, a subject everyone was eager to discuss.
    BTW, you should really do an SM2 demo- I think you'd be surprised how we stack up against the (friendly) competition…

  • Same way you get folks to blog about you or write stories about you – pick up the phone and start showing them your value, build your relationship and offer to help.

  • Same way you get folks to blog about you or write stories about you – pick up the phone and start showing them your value, build your relationship and offer to help.

  • I'd rather be the needle in a haystack instead of another piece of hay. I think there are too many charlatans that fail to map business objectives and strategy to social media tactics. So that's why I'd prefer not to be 'mainstream' despite your best efforts. ;)

    Keep up the great work, homie.

  • I'd rather be the needle in a haystack instead of another piece of hay. I think there are too many charlatans that fail to map business objectives and strategy to social media tactics. So that's why I'd prefer not to be 'mainstream' despite your best efforts. ;)

    Keep up the great work, homie.

  • Nice challenge to the world of social-media folks! … i imagine getting out to 'others' who are not imersed in social-media will do a lot for the industry as a whole. it will challenge us in new ways, make us think more about how to use the tools for industries that we may not be as familiar with and in general require us to learn & extend.

    one question … how do you get teaching/speaking/workshop type engagements with the groups outside the 'echo' chamber??


    http://twitter.com/franswaa

  • Nice challenge to the world of social-media folks! … i imagine getting out to 'others' who are not imersed in social-media will do a lot for the industry as a whole. it will challenge us in new ways, make us think more about how to use the tools for industries that we may not be as familiar with and in general require us to learn & extend.

    one question … how do you get teaching/speaking/workshop type engagements with the groups outside the 'echo' chamber??


    http://twitter.com/franswaa

  • Nice challenge to the world of social-media folks! … i imagine getting out to 'others' who are not imersed in social-media will do a lot for the industry as a whole. it will challenge us in new ways, make us think more about how to use the tools for industries that we may not be as familiar with and in general require us to learn & extend.

    one question … how do you get teaching/speaking/workshop type engagements with the groups outside the 'echo' chamber??


    http://twitter.com/franswaa

    • Same way you get folks to blog about you or write stories about you – pick up the phone and start showing them your value, build your relationship and offer to help.

  • But Nick, I'm trying to put you in a box on the shelf in the social media aisle so the mainstream can find you.

    Heh.

    Well said, my man.

  • But Nick, I'm trying to put you in a box on the shelf in the social media aisle so the mainstream can find you.

    Heh.

    Well said, my man.

  • Good discussion here, and thanks again for your thought leadership at the breakfast and in general. Reading these replies reminds me to add an editorial note: I'm not a social media consultant and never claimed to be. ;)

    To me, social media is just an extension of marketing / communications / PR / research / customer service from which business value can be derived. In short, I'm merely a business consultant that knows how to use social media as a tool.

  • Good discussion here, and thanks again for your thought leadership at the breakfast and in general. Reading these replies reminds me to add an editorial note: I'm not a social media consultant and never claimed to be. ;)

    To me, social media is just an extension of marketing / communications / PR / research / customer service from which business value can be derived. In short, I'm merely a business consultant that knows how to use social media as a tool.

  • Good discussion here, and thanks again for your thought leadership at the breakfast and in general. Reading these replies reminds me to add an editorial note: I'm not a social media consultant and never claimed to be. ;)

    To me, social media is just an extension of marketing / communications / PR / research / customer service from which business value can be derived. In short, I'm merely a business consultant that knows how to use social media as a tool.

    • But Nick, I'm trying to put you in a box on the shelf in the social media aisle so the mainstream can find you.

      Heh.

      Well said, my man.

      • I'd rather be the needle in a haystack instead of another piece of hay. I think there are too many charlatans that fail to map business objectives and strategy to social media tactics. So that's why I'd prefer not to be 'mainstream' despite your best efforts. ;)

        Keep up the great work, homie.

  • And that's why so many of us follow and read you, Mr. Green. Ahead of the curve you are.

  • And that's why so many of us follow and read you, Mr. Green. Ahead of the curve you are.

  • Just hoping a few clients fall my way, too. Heh.

  • Just hoping a few clients fall my way, too. Heh.

  • Good news, Connie. I think we're going to find a high volume of folks thirsty for what we do. Glad you're a sponsor there and good luck with the new clients.

  • Good news, Connie. I think we're going to find a high volume of folks thirsty for what we do. Glad you're a sponsor there and good luck with the new clients.

  • For the very reason you mention, I neither attend not speak at Social Media conferences. Instead, I speak to business people, but not just about SM, because that is a deadend street. Instead, we discuss ways to implement and launch effecting marketing and communications, starting with goals, then strategies and using the right tools. Talking about SM or SN in a vacuum is just not an effective approach to helping businesses.

  • For the very reason you mention, I neither attend not speak at Social Media conferences. Instead, I speak to business people, but not just about SM, because that is a deadend street. Instead, we discuss ways to implement and launch effecting marketing and communications, starting with goals, then strategies and using the right tools. Talking about SM or SN in a vacuum is just not an effective approach to helping businesses.

  • For the very reason you mention, I neither attend not speak at Social Media conferences. Instead, I speak to business people, but not just about SM, because that is a deadend street. Instead, we discuss ways to implement and launch effecting marketing and communications, starting with goals, then strategies and using the right tools. Talking about SM or SN in a vacuum is just not an effective approach to helping businesses.

    • And that's why so many of us follow and read you, Mr. Green. Ahead of the curve you are.

  • Awesome Scott. Let us know how it goes and good luck.

  • Awesome Scott. Let us know how it goes and good luck.

  • Travis,

    Thanks for the perspective and feedback. I'm certainly aware of the “press release is dead” talk and what not, but I've never been one to say that social media is a replacement for anything. My approach, and I think that of many other social media thinkers – while not articulated well sometimes, is that social media is a new media compliment or supplement to traditional marketing that, when approached strategically, has far-reaching and powerful positive effects on a brand's business.

    I agree with you that traditional media outreach still has more volume impact that most social media outreach, but using both effectively is the right strategic approach.

    Thanks for the input.

  • Travis,

    Thanks for the perspective and feedback. I'm certainly aware of the “press release is dead” talk and what not, but I've never been one to say that social media is a replacement for anything. My approach, and I think that of many other social media thinkers – while not articulated well sometimes, is that social media is a new media compliment or supplement to traditional marketing that, when approached strategically, has far-reaching and powerful positive effects on a brand's business.

    I agree with you that traditional media outreach still has more volume impact that most social media outreach, but using both effectively is the right strategic approach.

    Thanks for the input.

  • Hey Jason – good stuff. I'm attending the Marketing Profs Digital Mixer in October for this very reason. Much of the content is focused on social media and the new horizons it creates, but the audience is going to be filled with corporate marketing and communication professionals who are just beginning to understand the role these tools and practices play in their business.

    Personally, I'm hoping to focus heavily on local events in industries that have need for better understanding of communication practices in general, and hope that social media becomes part of the conversation there. Teaching each other has value, but our real contribution to the business world needs to be in sharing our knowledge with those who don't have it.

    Thanks for shaking the trees yet again, my friend.

  • Hey Jason – good stuff. I'm attending the Marketing Profs Digital Mixer in October for this very reason. Much of the content is focused on social media and the new horizons it creates, but the audience is going to be filled with corporate marketing and communication professionals who are just beginning to understand the role these tools and practices play in their business.

    Personally, I'm hoping to focus heavily on local events in industries that have need for better understanding of communication practices in general, and hope that social media becomes part of the conversation there. Teaching each other has value, but our real contribution to the business world needs to be in sharing our knowledge with those who don't have it.

    Thanks for shaking the trees yet again, my friend.

  • Hey Jason – good stuff. I'm attending the Marketing Profs Digital Mixer in October for this very reason. Much of the content is focused on social media and the new horizons it creates, but the audience is going to be filled with corporate marketing and communication professionals who are just beginning to understand the role these tools and practices play in their business.

    Personally, I'm hoping to focus heavily on local events in industries that have need for better understanding of communication practices in general, and hope that social media becomes part of the conversation there. Teaching each other has value, but our real contribution to the business world needs to be in sharing our knowledge with those who don't have it.

    Thanks for shaking the trees yet again, my friend.

    • Just hoping a few clients fall my way, too. Heh.

  • Thanks for this, Rebeca. Your “came together for me” notion really hits the value of a conference on the head. It's often not about one session, but the accumulation of the sessions and networking that makes it good or bad. I'm glad we could help deliver on the value for you at BWE.

    And someone like you — and it-getter enough to know to go to BWE and someone exploring the social space — is still an important and valid audience for the social media thinkers. If we fail to serve folks like you, a void will happen that we don't want.

    Thanks for chiming in.

  • Thanks for this, Rebeca. Your “came together for me” notion really hits the value of a conference on the head. It's often not about one session, but the accumulation of the sessions and networking that makes it good or bad. I'm glad we could help deliver on the value for you at BWE.

    And someone like you — and it-getter enough to know to go to BWE and someone exploring the social space — is still an important and valid audience for the social media thinkers. If we fail to serve folks like you, a void will happen that we don't want.

    Thanks for chiming in.

  • connie

    I'm replying from an industry meeting of association executives where I came as a sponsor. Everybody is fascinated by what I do and eager to learn but don't know where to start. This is research for me – to develop programs for different industries. I decided to jump out of the echo chamber back in the summer & very glad I did.

  • connie

    I'm replying from an industry meeting of association executives where I came as a sponsor. Everybody is fascinated by what I do and eager to learn but don't know where to start. This is research for me – to develop programs for different industries. I decided to jump out of the echo chamber back in the summer & very glad I did.

  • connie

    I'm replying from an industry meeting of association executives where I came as a sponsor. Everybody is fascinated by what I do and eager to learn but don't know where to start. This is research for me – to develop programs for different industries. I decided to jump out of the echo chamber back in the summer & very glad I did.

    • Good news, Connie. I think we're going to find a high volume of folks thirsty for what we do. Glad you're a sponsor there and good luck with the new clients.

  • Nice post, Jason. I'm stepping out of the echo chamber to talk to another chamber later this month: the local Chamber of Commerce. There's a horde of business leaders who hear the ruckus we're causing in the corner and want to know how they can use social media.

  • Nice post, Jason. I'm stepping out of the echo chamber to talk to another chamber later this month: the local Chamber of Commerce. There's a horde of business leaders who hear the ruckus we're causing in the corner and want to know how they can use social media.

  • Nice post, Jason. I'm stepping out of the echo chamber to talk to another chamber later this month: the local Chamber of Commerce. There's a horde of business leaders who hear the ruckus we're causing in the corner and want to know how they can use social media.

    • Awesome Scott. Let us know how it goes and good luck.

  • I think this “PR people are failing to grok / implement social media” is one of the most common battle cries in this 'social media echo chamber' that you describe. This is another echo – not an original thought.

    For 3-4 years, we've been hearing that “the press release is dead.” Meanwhile, the press release continues to be AMONG various good ways to fulfill disclosure obligations, increase web traffic, SEO, etc.

    Part of my problem with the “social media echo chamber” is that a lot of the cheerleading has these sort of zero sum conclusions that current PR approaches are broken and social media is the cure-all. Really? The last time I worked at a company where we got a prominent story in a major business press publication or Slashdot the amount of traffic to the web site and the ensuing impact on sales was UNREAL. And sometimes a press release – and going through the steps of organizing the most effective way to tell a company's story – is a necessary exercise that precedes getting a major story.

    If you work in marketing / PR it's sort of painful to repeatedly hear the social tech arguments described as replacements for existing approaches. Just because you can go on the web and find many more lame press releases than good ones, it doesn't stand to reason that press releases have zero value and that they should be buried in favor of social tools. What – are you saying that most people that do social media do it well? I can surface many more examples of useless social media arm waving than effective implementation. So I guess we can surmise that social is dead? Clearly this is a flawed argument.

    How about – in addition to getting out of the echo chamber – advocates for social media w/in PR and marketing contexts get a little clearer about where the value add is, instead of so readily rallying for the death of existing PR / marketing approaches that still have their place. No, social media doesn't displace everything. It's something that can create new opportunities and enhance others. But frankly this cry of press releases being dead is not only trite, but suggests a lack of understanding that some tools (while archaic) do continue to serve a purpose.

  • I think this “PR people are failing to grok / implement social media” is one of the most common battle cries in this 'social media echo chamber' that you describe. This is another echo – not an original thought.

    For 3-4 years, we've been hearing that “the press release is dead.” Meanwhile, the press release continues to be AMONG various good ways to fulfill disclosure obligations, increase web traffic, SEO, etc.

    Part of my problem with the “social media echo chamber” is that a lot of the cheerleading has these sort of zero sum conclusions that current PR approaches are broken and social media is the cure-all. Really? The last time I worked at a company where we got a prominent story in a major business press publication or Slashdot the amount of traffic to the web site and the ensuing impact on sales was UNREAL. And sometimes a press release – and going through the steps of organizing the most effective way to tell a company's story – is a necessary exercise that precedes getting a major story.

    If you work in marketing / PR it's sort of painful to repeatedly hear the social tech arguments described as replacements for existing approaches. Just because you can go on the web and find many more lame press releases than good ones, it doesn't stand to reason that press releases have zero value and that they should be buried in favor of social tools. What – are you saying that most people that do social media do it well? I can surface many more examples of useless social media arm waving than effective implementation. So I guess we can surmise that social is dead? Clearly this is a flawed argument.

    How about – in addition to getting out of the echo chamber – advocates for social media w/in PR and marketing contexts get a little clearer about where the value add is, instead of so readily rallying for the death of existing PR / marketing approaches that still have their place. No, social media doesn't displace everything. It's something that can create new opportunities and enhance others. But frankly this cry of press releases being dead is not only trite, but suggests a lack of understanding that some tools (while archaic) do continue to serve a purpose.

  • I think this “PR people are failing to grok / implement social media” is one of the most common battle cries in this 'social media echo chamber' that you describe. This is another echo – not an original thought.

    For 3-4 years, we've been hearing that “the press release is dead.” Meanwhile, the press release continues to be AMONG various good ways to fulfill disclosure obligations, increase web traffic, SEO, etc.

    Part of my problem with the “social media echo chamber” is that a lot of the cheerleading has these sort of zero sum conclusions that current PR approaches are broken and social media is the cure-all. Really? The last time I worked at a company where we got a prominent story in a major business press publication or Slashdot the amount of traffic to the web site and the ensuing impact on sales was UNREAL. And sometimes a press release – and going through the steps of organizing the most effective way to tell a company's story – is a necessary exercise that precedes getting a major story.

    If you work in marketing / PR it's sort of painful to repeatedly hear the social tech arguments described as replacements for existing approaches. Just because you can go on the web and find many more lame press releases than good ones, it doesn't stand to reason that press releases have zero value and that they should be buried in favor of social tools. What – are you saying that most people that do social media do it well? I can surface many more examples of useless social media arm waving than effective implementation. So I guess we can surmise that social is dead? Clearly this is a flawed argument.

    How about – in addition to getting out of the echo chamber – advocates for social media w/in PR and marketing contexts get a little clearer about where the value add is, instead of so readily rallying for the death of existing PR / marketing approaches that still have their place. No, social media doesn't displace everything. It's something that can create new opportunities and enhance others. But frankly this cry of press releases being dead is not only trite, but suggests a lack of understanding that some tools (while archaic) do continue to serve a purpose.

    • Travis,

      Thanks for the perspective and feedback. I'm certainly aware of the “press release is dead” talk and what not, but I've never been one to say that social media is a replacement for anything. My approach, and I think that of many other social media thinkers – while not articulated well sometimes, is that social media is a new media compliment or supplement to traditional marketing that, when approached strategically, has far-reaching and powerful positive effects on a brand's business.

      I agree with you that traditional media outreach still has more volume impact that most social media outreach, but using both effectively is the right strategic approach.

      Thanks for the input.

  • As an “outsider” of the Social Media Consulting world, it's interesting coming into an event like BlogWorld. I assigned the “PR & Blogging” panel as my TOP priority at the show – for the very reason that there is so much more we can do through the use of social media from a PR standpoint.

    From an attendee perspective, nothing I learned would have held significant ground for me on its own: everything came together for me from all the different panels I attended. However, I can say quite confidently that the “glue” was seeing the synergy of social media pros such as yourself, Chris Brogan, Brian Solis and Lee Odden. To experience your excitement and passion for what you all do, and your positive support of each other, really made the conference complete for me, and I'd be willing to guess the same for many other attendees.

    I know this didn't quite address your call to action, but I did just want to let you know that there is value to the bubble for those who aren't quite in it. I guess you can argue that I do “get it” by virtue of the fact that I knew I needed to be at BlogWorld, so this is all probably moot. Regardless, I agree wholeheartedly that too many people across multiple industries are suffering by not recognizing the need to implement a social media strategy.

  • As an “outsider” of the Social Media Consulting world, it's interesting coming into an event like BlogWorld. I assigned the “PR & Blogging” panel as my TOP priority at the show – for the very reason that there is so much more we can do through the use of social media from a PR standpoint.

    From an attendee perspective, nothing I learned would have held significant ground for me on its own: everything came together for me from all the different panels I attended. However, I can say quite confidently that the “glue” was seeing the synergy of social media pros such as yourself, Chris Brogan, Brian Solis and Lee Odden. To experience your excitement and passion for what you all do, and your positive support of each other, really made the conference complete for me, and I'd be willing to guess the same for many other attendees.

    I know this didn't quite address your call to action, but I did just want to let you know that there is value to the bubble for those who aren't quite in it. I guess you can argue that I do “get it” by virtue of the fact that I knew I needed to be at BlogWorld, so this is all probably moot. Regardless, I agree wholeheartedly that too many people across multiple industries are suffering by not recognizing the need to implement a social media strategy.

  • As an “outsider” of the Social Media Consulting world, it's interesting coming into an event like BlogWorld. I assigned the “PR & Blogging” panel as my TOP priority at the show – for the very reason that there is so much more we can do through the use of social media from a PR standpoint.

    From an attendee perspective, nothing I learned would have held significant ground for me on its own: everything came together for me from all the different panels I attended. However, I can say quite confidently that the “glue” was seeing the synergy of social media pros such as yourself, Chris Brogan, Brian Solis and Lee Odden. To experience your excitement and passion for what you all do, and your positive support of each other, really made the conference complete for me, and I'd be willing to guess the same for many other attendees.

    I know this didn't quite address your call to action, but I did just want to let you know that there is value to the bubble for those who aren't quite in it. I guess you can argue that I do “get it” by virtue of the fact that I knew I needed to be at BlogWorld, so this is all probably moot. Regardless, I agree wholeheartedly that too many people across multiple industries are suffering by not recognizing the need to implement a social media strategy.

    • Thanks for this, Rebeca. Your “came together for me” notion really hits the value of a conference on the head. It's often not about one session, but the accumulation of the sessions and networking that makes it good or bad. I'm glad we could help deliver on the value for you at BWE.

      And someone like you — and it-getter enough to know to go to BWE and someone exploring the social space — is still an important and valid audience for the social media thinkers. If we fail to serve folks like you, a void will happen that we don't want.

      Thanks for chiming in.

  • Thanks Erica. Hopefully, we can help you on the new media front. What I hope to get from you is a promise that you'll take what you learn and share it with someone else, preferably someone outside the new media circle. The bigger the footprint, the stronger our future will be as new media advocates.

  • Thanks Erica. Hopefully, we can help you on the new media front. What I hope to get from you is a promise that you'll take what you learn and share it with someone else, preferably someone outside the new media circle. The bigger the footprint, the stronger our future will be as new media advocates.

  • Thanks Brian. I think we (marketers in general, but certainly applicable anywhere) naturally gravitate to blowing smoke up each other's butts. It's the scratch my back ego effect. We want to think we're smart, so we tell others they are hoping they'll return the favor. They do and we all sit at conferences in our niche and think we're smart together. This isn't bad, it just is.

    What's hard, as you know, is walking into a conference where people don't know you're smart and don't blow smoke up your butt. Those are the audiences we need to tackle.

    Glad to see you. It's been a while.

  • Thanks Brian. I think we (marketers in general, but certainly applicable anywhere) naturally gravitate to blowing smoke up each other's butts. It's the scratch my back ego effect. We want to think we're smart, so we tell others they are hoping they'll return the favor. They do and we all sit at conferences in our niche and think we're smart together. This isn't bad, it just is.

    What's hard, as you know, is walking into a conference where people don't know you're smart and don't blow smoke up your butt. Those are the audiences we need to tackle.

    Glad to see you. It's been a while.

  • Erica

    Jason – Great post! I can't agree with you more. As a PR professional trying to expand my horizons on the new media front, I believe that advice from experts and those knowledgable about the industry can only help us to understand how to improve and become a part of the conversation.

    Thanks again!

  • Erica

    Jason – Great post! I can't agree with you more. As a PR professional trying to expand my horizons on the new media front, I believe that advice from experts and those knowledgable about the industry can only help us to understand how to improve and become a part of the conversation.

    Thanks again!

  • Erica

    Jason – Great post! I can't agree with you more. As a PR professional trying to expand my horizons on the new media front, I believe that advice from experts and those knowledgable about the industry can only help us to understand how to improve and become a part of the conversation.

    Thanks again!

    • Thanks Erica. Hopefully, we can help you on the new media front. What I hope to get from you is a promise that you'll take what you learn and share it with someone else, preferably someone outside the new media circle. The bigger the footprint, the stronger our future will be as new media advocates.

      • Erica

        Will do. My first project is my colleagues – they have to understand this stuff – it's the future of what we do!

  • Brian Wallace

    Hey Jason,

    I'm glad to hear you talk about this topic. Marketers in general are very good at pandering to the crowd, yet are lost at times when trying to get the same message heard in such unknown waters. Well said.

  • Brian Wallace

    Hey Jason,

    I'm glad to hear you talk about this topic. Marketers in general are very good at pandering to the crowd, yet are lost at times when trying to get the same message heard in such unknown waters. Well said.

  • Hey Jason,

    I'm glad to hear you talk about this topic. Marketers in general are very good at pandering to the crowd, yet are lost at times when trying to get the same message heard in such unknown waters. Well said.

    • Thanks Brian. I think we (marketers in general, but certainly applicable anywhere) naturally gravitate to blowing smoke up each other's butts. It's the scratch my back ego effect. We want to think we're smart, so we tell others they are hoping they'll return the favor. They do and we all sit at conferences in our niche and think we're smart together. This isn't bad, it just is.

      What's hard, as you know, is walking into a conference where people don't know you're smart and don't blow smoke up your butt. Those are the audiences we need to tackle.

      Glad to see you. It's been a while.

  • Agreed.

  • Agreed.

  • Agreed, sir. And thanks for the partial inspiration on this post as well. I'm right there with you on delivering impactful solutions to businesses. Teaching someone RSS feeds and seeing the look in their eye when the get it is pretty damn satisfying.

    Keep on keepin' on, my man. We need more of you in the world.

  • Agreed, sir. And thanks for the partial inspiration on this post as well. I'm right there with you on delivering impactful solutions to businesses. Teaching someone RSS feeds and seeing the look in their eye when the get it is pretty damn satisfying.

    Keep on keepin' on, my man. We need more of you in the world.

  • You're doing exactly what we need to be doing. Good for you!

  • You're doing exactly what we need to be doing. Good for you!

  • Completely agree, Whitney. Although I think it is important for the tools (or toys as you say) to be explored and studied within the industry or thinkers of Web 2.0 (for lack of a better term) I think it's imperative for the growth and health of social media in general for us to also look beyond our own world and evangelize their usage.

    Thanks for the input.

  • Completely agree, Whitney. Although I think it is important for the tools (or toys as you say) to be explored and studied within the industry or thinkers of Web 2.0 (for lack of a better term) I think it's imperative for the growth and health of social media in general for us to also look beyond our own world and evangelize their usage.

    Thanks for the input.

  • Thanks Mike. And thanks for the Tweet as well.

  • Thanks Mike. And thanks for the Tweet as well.

  • The thing I hear consistently from several social media professionals is how they are going to stop going to “their own” industry conferences and go to other industry conferences to spread the gospel. I think that's a good start. Events like BWE and SXSW are great for the faithful to hold hands and sing kumbaya, but they need to start teaching other people to sing.

  • The thing I hear consistently from several social media professionals is how they are going to stop going to “their own” industry conferences and go to other industry conferences to spread the gospel. I think that's a good start. Events like BWE and SXSW are great for the faithful to hold hands and sing kumbaya, but they need to start teaching other people to sing.

  • The thing I hear consistently from several social media professionals is how they are going to stop going to “their own” industry conferences and go to other industry conferences to spread the gospel. I think that's a good start. Events like BWE and SXSW are great for the faithful to hold hands and sing kumbaya, but they need to start teaching other people to sing.

  • Jason,

    Good post — right on point. I think it also depends on who your blog is aimed at/who your audience is. Many of our colleagues are blogging to the social media crowd. So I assume they're making their living by serving that population.

    So BlogWorld etc. is right on the money for them. Especially, if they have a book to sell or their blog is generating revenue with ads.

    Let's face it — we're ahead of the curve on this one. So the presentation we've give at BlogWorld to our peers is incredibly different from one you'd give the PRSA club or I'd give to a bunch of rural electric co-op presidents.

    What I love about talking to non-social media “believers” is that there are truly some remarkable tools they just don't know about. We can have impact on how they do business. Which, I think, is the way to invite them into the realm of social media. Make it valuable to them.

    Good discussion starter!

    Drew

  • Jason,

    Good post — right on point. I think it also depends on who your blog is aimed at/who your audience is. Many of our colleagues are blogging to the social media crowd. So I assume they're making their living by serving that population.

    So BlogWorld etc. is right on the money for them. Especially, if they have a book to sell or their blog is generating revenue with ads.

    Let's face it — we're ahead of the curve on this one. So the presentation we've give at BlogWorld to our peers is incredibly different from one you'd give the PRSA club or I'd give to a bunch of rural electric co-op presidents.

    What I love about talking to non-social media “believers” is that there are truly some remarkable tools they just don't know about. We can have impact on how they do business. Which, I think, is the way to invite them into the realm of social media. Make it valuable to them.

    Good discussion starter!

    Drew

  • Jason,

    Good post — right on point. I think it also depends on who your blog is aimed at/who your audience is. Many of our colleagues are blogging to the social media crowd. So I assume they're making their living by serving that population.

    So BlogWorld etc. is right on the money for them. Especially, if they have a book to sell or their blog is generating revenue with ads.

    Let's face it — we're ahead of the curve on this one. So the presentation we've give at BlogWorld to our peers is incredibly different from one you'd give the PRSA club or I'd give to a bunch of rural electric co-op presidents.

    What I love about talking to non-social media “believers” is that there are truly some remarkable tools they just don't know about. We can have impact on how they do business. Which, I think, is the way to invite them into the realm of social media. Make it valuable to them.

    Good discussion starter!

    Drew

    • Agreed, sir. And thanks for the partial inspiration on this post as well. I'm right there with you on delivering impactful solutions to businesses. Teaching someone RSS feeds and seeing the look in their eye when the get it is pretty damn satisfying.

      Keep on keepin' on, my man. We need more of you in the world.

  • I wholeheartedly agree here, Jason. I think it's easy to fall into the trap of talking to ourselves inside the each chamber, since we seem to like and support each other so much. But it's stepping outside the babble that's vital. I'm also giving a presentation to a PRSA group this week — on the basics of blogging. That's right, so many communications professionals are just getting started in social media, and we have the power to share what we've learned along way. Can't wait until Thursday afternoon.

    –Bryan Person
    LiveWorld social media evangelist

  • I wholeheartedly agree here, Jason. I think it's easy to fall into the trap of talking to ourselves inside the each chamber, since we seem to like and support each other so much. But it's stepping outside the babble that's vital. I'm also giving a presentation to a PRSA group this week — on the basics of blogging. That's right, so many communications professionals are just getting started in social media, and we have the power to share what we've learned along way. Can't wait until Thursday afternoon.

    –Bryan Person
    LiveWorld social media evangelist

  • I wholeheartedly agree here, Jason. I think it's easy to fall into the trap of talking to ourselves inside the each chamber, since we seem to like and support each other so much. But it's stepping outside the babble that's vital. I'm also giving a presentation to a PRSA group this week — on the basics of blogging. That's right, so many communications professionals are just getting started in social media, and we have the power to share what we've learned along way. Can't wait until Thursday afternoon.

    –Bryan Person
    LiveWorld social media evangelist

    • You're doing exactly what we need to be doing. Good for you!

  • One of the things I love about Podcamp is that it is a low-cost “intro” conference that lets people from different professions- marketing, PR, Education, Traditional Media- all get together and explore new media and social media together. While Podcamp started out as a “podcasting” conference, the truth is if you have a Podcast, you need to understand everything from blogging to PR to Marketing to SEO to do it well, so the core mission of Podcamp expanded to meet those needs. And the cross-pollination that happens there is the most important part.

    After being in this field for over two years now, I am not just a “blogger” or an “interactive media specialist” or a “producer of online content” but all of those things and more. And this means my clients also need to understand that social media is more than just a blog, or podcast or video online, but it is the strategic use of these mediums for effective communication.

    As long as Social Media and conferences continue to sub-divide the world by the “toy”- ie blog, podcast, etc. and not by the goal, effectively communicating your message to others, we'll continue to get the fishbowl effect at conferences.

  • One of the things I love about Podcamp is that it is a low-cost “intro” conference that lets people from different professions- marketing, PR, Education, Traditional Media- all get together and explore new media and social media together. While Podcamp started out as a “podcasting” conference, the truth is if you have a Podcast, you need to understand everything from blogging to PR to Marketing to SEO to do it well, so the core mission of Podcamp expanded to meet those needs. And the cross-pollination that happens there is the most important part.

    After being in this field for over two years now, I am not just a “blogger” or an “interactive media specialist” or a “producer of online content” but all of those things and more. And this means my clients also need to understand that social media is more than just a blog, or podcast or video online, but it is the strategic use of these mediums for effective communication.

    As long as Social Media and conferences continue to sub-divide the world by the “toy”- ie blog, podcast, etc. and not by the goal, effectively communicating your message to others, we'll continue to get the fishbowl effect at conferences.

  • One of the things I love about Podcamp is that it is a low-cost “intro” conference that lets people from different professions- marketing, PR, Education, Traditional Media- all get together and explore new media and social media together. While Podcamp started out as a “podcasting” conference, the truth is if you have a Podcast, you need to understand everything from blogging to PR to Marketing to SEO to do it well, so the core mission of Podcamp expanded to meet those needs. And the cross-pollination that happens there is the most important part.

    After being in this field for over two years now, I am not just a “blogger” or an “interactive media specialist” or a “producer of online content” but all of those things and more. And this means my clients also need to understand that social media is more than just a blog, or podcast or video online, but it is the strategic use of these mediums for effective communication.

    As long as Social Media and conferences continue to sub-divide the world by the “toy”- ie blog, podcast, etc. and not by the goal, effectively communicating your message to others, we'll continue to get the fishbowl effect at conferences.

    • Completely agree, Whitney. Although I think it is important for the tools (or toys as you say) to be explored and studied within the industry or thinkers of Web 2.0 (for lack of a better term) I think it's imperative for the growth and health of social media in general for us to also look beyond our own world and evangelize their usage.

      Thanks for the input.

  • Always reach out to the fringe – not only does it allow you to escape the 'echo chamber ' – it breaks down 'gatekeeper'- type barriers to your intended target. Great piece!

  • Always reach out to the fringe – not only does it allow you to escape the 'echo chamber ' – it breaks down 'gatekeeper'- type barriers to your intended target. Great piece!

  • Always reach out to the fringe – not only does it allow you to escape the 'echo chamber ' – it breaks down 'gatekeeper'- type barriers to your intended target. Great piece!

    • Thanks Mike. And thanks for the Tweet as well.