Should I Change The Way I Share?

by Jason Falls |

You know by now I have a pretty solid Twitter strategy. My daily routine, unless travel or real work takes precedent, includes going through the over 400 blogs and websites whose content I subscribe to and finding the good nuggets of the day to share on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and now Google+. Social channels like these have made finding and sharing content super easy and fast, but also time consuming and disorganized in aggregate.

So I’ve been thinking about how to streamline the process. While I do automate many posts (yes, I know … the social media purists will likely keel over in a fit of anti-Kumbaya rage), I still write the material that leads people to click on the link and still whole-heartedly endorse and recommend the content. I automate so that my audience doesn’t get 15 links in the span of three minutes every morning at 8:45 and then nothing from me the rest of the day. It’s my way of balancing your content diet and not appearing to just puke links each morning. (Thank you Argyle Social for making that possible.)

Automating more of the process may get a bit more impersonal, which I don’t want. Thought having a more streamlined and less time consuming process would be nice. But there’s another angle to it all: Am I supplying the content providers with less of a service by sharing those links on social networks and not on my blog? Remember the old Blog Carnival, weekly roundups where people would just link to good content? We stopped doing that (some of us anyway) about 2009 for some reason. Maybe Twitter gave us a more real-time way to share, but the SEO value of a blog link is probably still worth more than one from Twitter, isn’t it?

Not to mention, the value of driving people to your blog, capturing that attention and traffic, and potentially exposing them to some of the other cool nuggets of information or products you have to offer.

So I’m rethinking sharing a bit. And want your input. Here’s the question I’d like to ask on video. Please use the comments to share your thoughts on what might be a better way:

The comments, as always, are yours.


About the Author

Jason Falls

Jason Falls is a leading thinker, speaker and strategist in the world of digital marketing and is co-author of two books, No Bullshit Social Media: The All-Business, No-Hype Guide To Social Media Marketing and The Rebel's Guide To Email Marketing. By day, he leads digital strategy for Elasticity, one of the world's most innovative digital marketing and public relations firms. Follow him on Twitter (@JasonFalls).