Social Media Case Study: Humana's Freewheelin - Social Media Explorer
Social Media Case Study: Humana’s Freewheelin
Social Media Case Study: Humana’s Freewheelin
by
Jason Falls
Jason Falls

Most of you know I like to brag on Louisville and Kentucky. Humana, one of the country’s largest and most successful healthcare companies is headquartered here. Humana also has a division dedicated to consumer innovation, which has been doing some interesting things with social media lately under Greg Matthew’s guidance. Today’s post is a case study of Humana’s Consumer Innovation team’s use of social media to promote and grow its Freewheelin initiative. But first, some disclosure.

Doe-Anderson presently works with Humana on a number of advertising and marketing projects, none of them with its innovation division. While I have had the pleasure of meeting and getting to know Greg, Chris Hall and some others within the Innovation Center there, and a former co-worker of mine, Kristen Jordan, is currently employed with them, I had no ties to this program, nor knowledge of their strategies before execution. Greg simply asked if I’d be interested in seeing how they did. I agreed, so long as an honest appraisal could follow here. He agreed.

Freewheelin can best be described as a bicycle sharing program with a community of green- and health-friendly participants at its core. It’s not just a set of stations where you can rent a bike for a few hours in big cities. It’s that, but with the fundamental higher purpose of promoting better health for humans and the earth as the fabric that ties its users together. No, you don’t have to be a health nut to get a bike. But if you are, you’re probably going to find some new friends when you do.

Because Humana’s Freewheelin program was new, the basic goals of the social media program were to build awareness, participation and buzz and create a place online for users to interact and generate content. This summer’s political conventions offered the perfect backdrops as both Denver and Minneapolis are generally healthier cities.

Matthew’s team identified biker groups in each city using Meetup.com and arranged group rides leading up to the conventions as word-of-mouth initiatives. At the rides, participants were given business card sized information sheets about Freewheelin and where to go online to share. They were also given the chance to upload images or videos at upload stations when they returned their bikes. During the conventions, they were also given a free branded memory card reader so they could continue to remember to upload their Freewheelin experiences.

Of course, Humana volunteers armed with smart phones cycled around the city and seeded some content but when a little started flowing on YouTube and Flickr, more organic content followed.

They began their online efforts with a Facebook page which they advertised to build up some fan base. Some blogger outreach, the launching of its own blog and Twitter stream helped lead to a community shift to a larger site at FreewheelinWayToGo.com where you could:

  • See team blog posts and tweets through a FriendFeed widget
  • Play the team’s YouTube videos
  • Watch streaming video through the uStream widget (with a click-thru to all cycle stations)
  • See the most recent uploads to their Flickr group
  • Link to all of the Freewheelin community sites

To date, two fan blogs have sprung up over the initiative. The Flickr group has over 1,500 photo submissions. About a dozen or so YouTube fan videos have appeared. The efforts in the convention cities resulted in eight days of rides, over 7,500 total rides, 41,000 miles ridden and then the what the hell stats — 1.2 million calories burned and carbon offset of 14.6 metric tons. I hope Humana doesn’t pay someone to calculate that. I would NOT want that job.

Matthew Modine visits the Freewheelin Experience
Matthew Modine visits the Freewheelin Experience

There was a Freewhillin biker arrested live on CNN during one of the conventions, only protesting he had to have his bike back by seven p.m. Actor Matthew Modine, an avid biker himself, led a ride to support more bike-friendly cities in America at the Denver stop. Tom Browkaw, David Gregory and Daryl Hannah also showed up as other politicians and celebrities hopped on the band wagon for some Freewheelin support — all just because they were there.

Fantastic buzz and numbers and all from simply social media and presence. The challenge Freewheelin faces now is how to grow and sustain what has arguably been a successful program launch using social media. (No, I haven’t been retained. Heh.)

So here’s my take, unfettered and unapproved by Humana or Doe.

The strategy to seed and identify biker groups in each city was spot-on. The info cars, memory cards, upload stations, flat panel screens showing the online activity at bike stations (did I mention that?), all good. The fact that two fan blogs popped up? Phenomenal. The number of photos? Fair to good. YouTube fan videos? Fair. Was it successful? Yep. They developed a strategy, hit the ground with it and got people interested in Freewheelin’ for all it’s worth.

While they could have capitalized on the celebrity involvement a bit more (or could they if it was so organic?) and they admit their use of Twitter served as a great connecting point for the program but they were well into it before “figuring out” how to leverage it, the outcomes were still respectable as the grew into their new social media skin.

But was it enough? How does Humana benefit? Where is the payoff?

Other than incentivizing participation somehow — community votes on best video ride submission, etc. — I don’t know that they could have done a lot more to seed or promote. Maybe expanding their outreach beyond the biking communities to local fitness clubs and YMCAs could bring in a few more numbers, but they were hitting their prime target.

And where does Humana benefit in all this? Yeah, yeah, I get it. A healthier world means lower healthcare costs, lower overheads, bigger profits. And yes, Humana is a large company with large budgets to spend on such Consumer Innovations where ROI is sometimes an afterthought. But the skeptic in me says for Humana to really reap the benefits of a program like this, it needs more than three cities (they had pilot stations in Louisville) and YES, it needs more than social media, though what they’ve built is a great foundation.

What Matthews and his team has done is taken an idea – bike sharing – and turned it into something bigger. They’ve used social media to lay a foundation of success for future programs, invigorate a community of people behind a higher cause than just borrowing a bike to save some carbon footprint and they’ve established an on-line embodiment of that community that feeds it. Now all they need to do is find a way to get programs up and running in more cities to fan those flames and get us all Freewheelin.

While they could have done more, this was really a social media first for Humana. What the did more than anything is learn. With a foundation built and some lessons under the collar, I’m sure this is just a launching pad for more Freewheelin to come. Matthews and his colleagues are blogging about healthcare innovation at CrumpleItUp.com if you’re interested in following their learning and thinking.

At the risk of being a bit critique-averse because of my company’s affiliation with Humana and my friendships therein, I’ll turn this over to you. Shoot holes in it. What did they do wrong, right or not enough? What can they do to make it better, more meaningful and connective with future communities? Believe me, they are reading. Your opinion will make a difference. The comments are yours.

About the Author

Jason Falls
Jason Falls is the founder of Social Media Explorer and one of the most notable and outspoken voices in the social media marketing industry. He is a noted marketing keynote speaker, author of two books and unapologetic bourbon aficionado. He can also be found at JasonFalls.com.
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  • Here's a link to the post I mentioned in my previous comment – http://bit.ly/wrpKi

    Thanks, Jason.

  • Here's a link to the post I mentioned in my previous comment – http://bit.ly/wrpKi

    Thanks, Jason.

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  • Robin: This is really perceptive. The interesting thing is that Freewheelin at the Conventions really WAS a campaign . . . and this was one of our biggest learnings. We've spent the last few months creating the product that would meet the demand created by freewheelin (it's called bcycle – see bcycle.com).
    But in the process, we didn't make a good transition with freewheelin and the community we'd built. We're hoping that it's not too late to do that now . . . but in hindsight, I'd have been a lot more purposeful about it. Thanks for the comments – you're absolutely right.

  • Robin: This is really perceptive. The interesting thing is that Freewheelin at the Conventions really WAS a campaign . . . and this was one of our biggest learnings. We've spent the last few months creating the product that would meet the demand created by freewheelin (it's called bcycle – see bcycle.com).
    But in the process, we didn't make a good transition with freewheelin and the community we'd built. We're hoping that it's not too late to do that now . . . but in hindsight, I'd have been a lot more purposeful about it. Thanks for the comments – you're absolutely right.

  • M: You're absolutely right. One of the things we've learned about bikesharing is that it really is a full-community endeavor. And as good as Louisville's intentions are, we still have some work to do to make our community truly bike-friendly.

    Humana's JV spinoff (bcycle – see crumpleitup.com/blog) has recently sold a full bikesharing system to the city of Denver. With the mayor's support, the city is very purposefully and systematically going about becoming the most bike-friendly city in America.

    A big part of that is to engage the community broadly, including local businesses. As we expand bikesharing in Louisville, we've already started talking to local businesses and advocacy groups to ensure that we're approaching that engagement in the same purposeful and systematic way we've seen in Denver.

  • M: You're absolutely right. One of the things we've learned about bikesharing is that it really is a full-community endeavor. And as good as Louisville's intentions are, we still have some work to do to make our community truly bike-friendly.

    Humana's JV spinoff (bcycle – see crumpleitup.com/blog) has recently sold a full bikesharing system to the city of Denver. With the mayor's support, the city is very purposefully and systematically going about becoming the most bike-friendly city in America.

    A big part of that is to engage the community broadly, including local businesses. As we expand bikesharing in Louisville, we've already started talking to local businesses and advocacy groups to ensure that we're approaching that engagement in the same purposeful and systematic way we've seen in Denver.

  • Hi, Leigh! Sorry for the delayed response. In addition to Chris Hall's response below, I wanted to add my $.02.

    Humana's Innovation Center exists primarily to explore the space that our company will occupy 5 to 10 years into the future. Often, this means contributing directly to the company's revenues in some way (i.e., by doing pharmacoeconomic research) or by operating independent/joint venture businesses (i.e., Sensei.com).

    Over the past two years, most of the Innovation functions pertinent to the Insurance business (i.e., improving the healthcare experience for Humana members) have moved out of the innovation center and into Humana's core business (and are stronger than ever). This has allowed the innovation center to branch out and explore what happens when you shift focus from today's sickness management system to a system that actually creates health.

    In addition to the bikes (see an update at crumpleitup.com/blog), we believe that 2009 is going to be the Year Of:
    Games for Health . . . we're launching our own exergame (the Horsepower Challenge – humanagames.com) in 20 cities;
    and Social Networks (we're working across the company to better leverage the power of social media to understand our customers better, to provide platforms for them to share their expertise with us and each other, etc.

    In short, we think that the US is at the beginning of a social revolution in health . . . and we are trying to feed those flames with our programs. If you're interested in staying connected, we'd love to have you join our CrumpleItUp Innovation Network on LinkedIn [http://www.linkedin.com/groups?about=&gid=903787&trk=anet_ug_grppro].

    Hope that this helps, and that we can keep the dialog going!

  • Hi, Leigh! Sorry for the delayed response. In addition to Chris Hall's response below, I wanted to add my $.02.

    Humana's Innovation Center exists primarily to explore the space that our company will occupy 5 to 10 years into the future. Often, this means contributing directly to the company's revenues in some way (i.e., by doing pharmacoeconomic research) or by operating independent/joint venture businesses (i.e., Sensei.com).

    Over the past two years, most of the Innovation functions pertinent to the Insurance business (i.e., improving the healthcare experience for Humana members) have moved out of the innovation center and into Humana's core business (and are stronger than ever). This has allowed the innovation center to branch out and explore what happens when you shift focus from today's sickness management system to a system that actually creates health.

    In addition to the bikes (see an update at crumpleitup.com/blog), we believe that 2009 is going to be the Year Of:
    Games for Health . . . we're launching our own exergame (the Horsepower Challenge – humanagames.com) in 20 cities;
    and Social Networks (we're working across the company to better leverage the power of social media to understand our customers better, to provide platforms for them to share their expertise with us and each other, etc.

    In short, we think that the US is at the beginning of a social revolution in health . . . and we are trying to feed those flames with our programs. If you're interested in staying connected, we'd love to have you join our CrumpleItUp Innovation Network on LinkedIn [http://www.linkedin.com/groups?about=&gid=903787&trk=anet_ug_grppro].

    Hope that this helps, and that we can keep the dialog going!

  • Hey! Good story on Humana. Actually their first dive into social media was the project you and I discussed the other day: the Humana Health Challenge. It was a test project involving challenge participants in 2 cities. The participants blogged about their progress and came to a website for tips and information on their particular health challenge. Unfortunately, they did not follow-up on this success or utilize any of the social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. That would have been awesome. So I guess this is their first real success into this realm.

  • Hey! Good story on Humana. Actually their first dive into social media was the project you and I discussed the other day: the Humana Health Challenge. It was a test project involving challenge participants in 2 cities. The participants blogged about their progress and came to a website for tips and information on their particular health challenge. Unfortunately, they did not follow-up on this success or utilize any of the social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. That would have been awesome. So I guess this is their first real success into this realm.

  • Hey! Good story on Humana. Actually their first dive into social media was the project you and I discussed the other day: the Humana Health Challenge. It was a test project involving challenge participants in 2 cities. The participants blogged about their progress and came to a website for tips and information on their particular health challenge. Unfortunately, they did not follow-up on this success or utilize any of the social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. That would have been awesome. So I guess this is their first real success into this realm.

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  • Sorry for the late reply…

    Leigh – What is unique about Freewheelin is that the program isn't limited to Humana members, and if you're not a Humana member because your employer is insured through another company we're not likely to get your individual business because of your experience with Freewheelin. That makes basing success strictly on ROI tricky. ;) That being said, one of our goals is to spread a health epidemic centered around life and happiness. What do you enjoy doing today that we can enhance with health, as opposed to telling you to do X, Y, and Z in order to be healthy. Its a different approach and we're learning along the way. The Freewheelin program at the DNC/RNC had business goals attached to it that were achieved beyond expectation. Numbers 2 and 3 on your list being part of the overall goal of the program.

    mlong006 – You raise a good point. Infrastructure is definitely a concern as bike sharing programs are implemented throughout the country. I believe that our current goal down town is to have a couple stations for Humana associates to utilize between buildings with expansion somewhere on the horizon.

    Robin – Fair enough, and I agree with your assessment that Freewheelin is a program and not a campaign. One of the challenges we're currently facing is the transition of Freewheelin into a stand alone business. There are some behind the scenes things happening to make that a reality and it is a learning process.

    Great points all around. I really appreciate the feedback. :)

    -chris

  • Sorry for the late reply…

    Leigh – What is unique about Freewheelin is that the program isn't limited to Humana members, and if you're not a Humana member because your employer is insured through another company we're not likely to get your individual business because of your experience with Freewheelin. That makes basing success strictly on ROI tricky. ;) That being said, one of our goals is to spread a health epidemic centered around life and happiness. What do you enjoy doing today that we can enhance with health, as opposed to telling you to do X, Y, and Z in order to be healthy. Its a different approach and we're learning along the way. The Freewheelin program at the DNC/RNC had business goals attached to it that were achieved beyond expectation. Numbers 2 and 3 on your list being part of the overall goal of the program.

    mlong006 – You raise a good point. Infrastructure is definitely a concern as bike sharing programs are implemented throughout the country. I believe that our current goal down town is to have a couple stations for Humana associates to utilize between buildings with expansion somewhere on the horizon.

    Robin – Fair enough, and I agree with your assessment that Freewheelin is a program and not a campaign. One of the challenges we're currently facing is the transition of Freewheelin into a stand alone business. There are some behind the scenes things happening to make that a reality and it is a learning process.

    Great points all around. I really appreciate the feedback. :)

    -chris

  • Sorry for the late reply…

    Leigh – What is unique about Freewheelin is that the program isn't limited to Humana members, and if you're not a Humana member because your employer is insured through another company we're not likely to get your individual business because of your experience with Freewheelin. That makes basing success strictly on ROI tricky. ;) That being said, one of our goals is to spread a health epidemic centered around life and happiness. What do you enjoy doing today that we can enhance with health, as opposed to telling you to do X, Y, and Z in order to be healthy. Its a different approach and we're learning along the way. The Freewheelin program at the DNC/RNC had business goals attached to it that were achieved beyond expectation. Numbers 2 and 3 on your list being part of the overall goal of the program.

    mlong006 – You raise a good point. Infrastructure is definitely a concern as bike sharing programs are implemented throughout the country. I believe that our current goal down town is to have a couple stations for Humana associates to utilize between buildings with expansion somewhere on the horizon.

    Robin – Fair enough, and I agree with your assessment that Freewheelin is a program and not a campaign. One of the challenges we're currently facing is the transition of Freewheelin into a stand alone business. There are some behind the scenes things happening to make that a reality and it is a learning process.

    Great points all around. I really appreciate the feedback. :)

    -chris

  • Excellent feedback and observations Robin. I'm sure the Humana folks appreciate it. Hopefully they'll respond as well.

  • Excellent feedback and observations Robin. I'm sure the Humana folks appreciate it. Hopefully they'll respond as well.

  • Good feedback. I'm sure the Humana folks will see it. Thanks for the information. Hopefully, they'll respond.

  • Good feedback. I'm sure the Humana folks will see it. Thanks for the information. Hopefully, they'll respond.

  • Thanks Leigh. I know the Humana folks are watching the feedback. Hopefully, they'll reply!

    Thanks again.

  • Thanks Leigh. I know the Humana folks are watching the feedback. Hopefully, they'll reply!

    Thanks again.

  • I like the idea, and they seemed to do a good job on the execution, but here's what gets me about these things. Technically, this isn't a campaign – this is something that should reasonably have no end. So, what is the long-term strategy for keeping the momentum going? That doesn't seem to have been addressed – the last post on FB appears to be from the RNC convention, the last tweet from December – do you see what I am getting at?

    Its really hard to keep momentum going without a regroup at regular intervals that take into account where things have headed. So instead of their just being a beginning and middle, there's either an end or some strategy for a continuing middle.

  • I like the idea, and they seemed to do a good job on the execution, but here's what gets me about these things. Technically, this isn't a campaign – this is something that should reasonably have no end. So, what is the long-term strategy for keeping the momentum going? That doesn't seem to have been addressed – the last post on FB appears to be from the RNC convention, the last tweet from December – do you see what I am getting at?

    Its really hard to keep momentum going without a regroup at regular intervals that take into account where things have headed. So instead of their just being a beginning and middle, there's either an end or some strategy for a continuing middle.

  • I like the idea, and they seemed to do a good job on the execution, but here's what gets me about these things. Technically, this isn't a campaign – this is something that should reasonably have no end. So, what is the long-term strategy for keeping the momentum going? That doesn't seem to have been addressed – the last post on FB appears to be from the RNC convention, the last tweet from December – do you see what I am getting at?

    Its really hard to keep momentum going without a regroup at regular intervals that take into account where things have headed. So instead of their just being a beginning and middle, there's either an end or some strategy for a continuing middle.

    • Excellent feedback and observations Robin. I'm sure the Humana folks appreciate it. Hopefully they'll respond as well.

    • Robin: This is really perceptive. The interesting thing is that Freewheelin at the Conventions really WAS a campaign . . . and this was one of our biggest learnings. We've spent the last few months creating the product that would meet the demand created by freewheelin (it's called bcycle – see bcycle.com).
      But in the process, we didn't make a good transition with freewheelin and the community we'd built. We're hoping that it's not too late to do that now . . . but in hindsight, I'd have been a lot more purposeful about it. Thanks for the comments – you're absolutely right.

  • mlong006

    One thing I think they might have done better in Louisville is inform some of the venues within reasonable riding distance of what was going on. Despite the fancy bike racks all around town, some venues still have no good place to handle an influx of bike traffic.

    The Edison House in Butchertown (could but) currently has no way to handle bikes well despite having a Humana marketing department employee on the board.

  • mlong006

    One thing I think they might have done better in Louisville is inform some of the venues within reasonable riding distance of what was going on. Despite the fancy bike racks all around town, some venues still have no good place to handle an influx of bike traffic.

    The Edison House in Butchertown (could but) currently has no way to handle bikes well despite having a Humana marketing department employee on the board.

  • mlong006

    One thing I think they might have done better in Louisville is inform some of the venues within reasonable riding distance of what was going on. Despite the fancy bike racks all around town, some venues still have no good place to handle an influx of bike traffic.

    The Edison House in Butchertown (could but) currently has no way to handle bikes well despite having a Humana marketing department employee on the board.

    • Good feedback. I'm sure the Humana folks will see it. Thanks for the information. Hopefully, they'll respond.

    • M: You're absolutely right. One of the things we've learned about bikesharing is that it really is a full-community endeavor. And as good as Louisville's intentions are, we still have some work to do to make our community truly bike-friendly.

      Humana's JV spinoff (bcycle – see crumpleitup.com/blog) has recently sold a full bikesharing system to the city of Denver. With the mayor's support, the city is very purposefully and systematically going about becoming the most bike-friendly city in America.

      A big part of that is to engage the community broadly, including local businesses. As we expand bikesharing in Louisville, we've already started talking to local businesses and advocacy groups to ensure that we're approaching that engagement in the same purposeful and systematic way we've seen in Denver.

  • Jason,

    Thanks for this information/case study. Looking forward to following Humana's innovation center and future initiatives. Could definitely see this model at work in other cities… bit like Zip Car but without the carbon footprint.

    I have done my share of health care consulting (pharma, health care, CPG) and find that companies in this space are more heavily funded than others… and that many innovation incubation centers are considered a cost center… with not much focus on proiftablity. So with this said & off the top of my head, I'd be interested to know:

    What Humana considers “success” to be. What do they consider ROI?
    Reasons behind branding choices (not Humana branded).
    What other initiatives they have on their plate, and how these speak to:
    1) improving the customer experience for Humana Customers
    2) improving Health Care experience (in general)
    3) Fostering better customer listening and engagement

    Thanks, Jason!

    Best,
    Leigh

  • Jason,

    Thanks for this information/case study. Looking forward to following Humana's innovation center and future initiatives. Could definitely see this model at work in other cities… bit like Zip Car but without the carbon footprint.

    I have done my share of health care consulting (pharma, health care, CPG) and find that companies in this space are more heavily funded than others… and that many innovation incubation centers are considered a cost center… with not much focus on proiftablity. So with this said & off the top of my head, I'd be interested to know:

    What Humana considers “success” to be. What do they consider ROI?
    Reasons behind branding choices (not Humana branded).
    What other initiatives they have on their plate, and how these speak to:
    1) improving the customer experience for Humana Customers
    2) improving Health Care experience (in general)
    3) Fostering better customer listening and engagement

    Thanks, Jason!

    Best,
    Leigh

  • Jason,

    Thanks for this information/case study. Looking forward to following Humana's innovation center and future initiatives. Could definitely see this model at work in other cities… bit like Zip Car but without the carbon footprint.

    I have done my share of health care consulting (pharma, health care, CPG) and find that companies in this space are more heavily funded than others… and that many innovation incubation centers are considered a cost center… with not much focus on proiftablity. So with this said & off the top of my head, I'd be interested to know:

    What Humana considers “success” to be. What do they consider ROI?
    Reasons behind branding choices (not Humana branded).
    What other initiatives they have on their plate, and how these speak to:
    1) improving the customer experience for Humana Customers
    2) improving Health Care experience (in general)
    3) Fostering better customer listening and engagement

    Thanks, Jason!

    Best,
    Leigh

    • Thanks Leigh. I know the Humana folks are watching the feedback. Hopefully, they'll reply!

      Thanks again.

    • Hi, Leigh! Sorry for the delayed response. In addition to Chris Hall's response below, I wanted to add my $.02.

      Humana's Innovation Center exists primarily to explore the space that our company will occupy 5 to 10 years into the future. Often, this means contributing directly to the company's revenues in some way (i.e., by doing pharmacoeconomic research) or by operating independent/joint venture businesses (i.e., Sensei.com).

      Over the past two years, most of the Innovation functions pertinent to the Insurance business (i.e., improving the healthcare experience for Humana members) have moved out of the innovation center and into Humana's core business (and are stronger than ever). This has allowed the innovation center to branch out and explore what happens when you shift focus from today's sickness management system to a system that actually creates health.

      In addition to the bikes (see an update at crumpleitup.com/blog), we believe that 2009 is going to be the Year Of:
      Games for Health . . . we're launching our own exergame (the Horsepower Challenge – humanagames.com) in 20 cities;
      and Social Networks (we're working across the company to better leverage the power of social media to understand our customers better, to provide platforms for them to share their expertise with us and each other, etc.

      In short, we think that the US is at the beginning of a social revolution in health . . . and we are trying to feed those flames with our programs. If you're interested in staying connected, we'd love to have you join our CrumpleItUp Innovation Network on LinkedIn [http://www.linkedin.com/groups?about=&gid=903787&trk=anet_ug_grppro].

      Hope that this helps, and that we can keep the dialog going!

  • You're welcome David. Do feel free to share links in your comments. We love to be able to refer folks to more thinking.

  • You're welcome David. Do feel free to share links in your comments. We love to be able to refer folks to more thinking.

  • Thanks Erwin. I would think the Asian markets might be more apt, being more bicycle-oriented, but I suppose I could be wrong. And please forgive me if I'm simply transferring a Japanese custom inappropriately but I was under the impression many Asian cities are cycle friendly. Why is it that Manila wouldn't see a high level of participation? Thanks for chiming in. Just curious.

  • Thanks Erwin. I would think the Asian markets might be more apt, being more bicycle-oriented, but I suppose I could be wrong. And please forgive me if I'm simply transferring a Japanese custom inappropriately but I was under the impression many Asian cities are cycle friendly. Why is it that Manila wouldn't see a high level of participation? Thanks for chiming in. Just curious.

  • Thanks for the efforts, Chris. Glad to open up the feedback channels. Hopefully, some folks will chime in.

  • Thanks for the efforts, Chris. Glad to open up the feedback channels. Hopefully, some folks will chime in.

  • Jason – thanks for sharing the case study and constructive critique/questions. I've shared a link to it in a comment on my post today “Three reasons why our Monday Morning Quarterbacks should stay off the field.”

    This was a great example of how to question and learn from other brands marketing efforts in a way that advances our profession forward. Thanks again.

  • Jason – thanks for sharing the case study and constructive critique/questions. I've shared a link to it in a comment on my post today “Three reasons why our Monday Morning Quarterbacks should stay off the field.”

    This was a great example of how to question and learn from other brands marketing efforts in a way that advances our profession forward. Thanks again.

  • Jason – thanks for sharing the case study and constructive critique/questions. I've shared a link to it in a comment on my post today “Three reasons why our Monday Morning Quarterbacks should stay off the field.”

    This was a great example of how to question and learn from other brands marketing efforts in a way that advances our profession forward. Thanks again.

    • You're welcome David. Do feel free to share links in your comments. We love to be able to refer folks to more thinking.

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  • Hi Jason,

    I just want to say it is a good initiative. You won't that level of participation in cities like Manila yet. :)

    Is Freewheelin sustainable? I have no idea.

    All the Best!

    Regards,

    Erwin Chua

  • Hi Jason,

    I just want to say it is a good initiative. You won't that level of participation in cities like Manila yet. :)

    Is Freewheelin sustainable? I have no idea.

    All the Best!

    Regards,

    Erwin Chua

  • Hi Jason,

    I just want to say it is a good initiative. You won't that level of participation in cities like Manila yet. :)

    Is Freewheelin sustainable? I have no idea.

    All the Best!

    Regards,

    Erwin Chua

    • Thanks Erwin. I would think the Asian markets might be more apt, being more bicycle-oriented, but I suppose I could be wrong. And please forgive me if I'm simply transferring a Japanese custom inappropriately but I was under the impression many Asian cities are cycle friendly. Why is it that Manila wouldn't see a high level of participation? Thanks for chiming in. Just curious.

  • Jason,

    We definitely want to get better at what we do, so I really look forward to any feedback coming our way. Thanks for the post. :)

    -chris

  • Jason,

    We definitely want to get better at what we do, so I really look forward to any feedback coming our way. Thanks for the post. :)

    -chris

  • Jason,

    We definitely want to get better at what we do, so I really look forward to any feedback coming our way. Thanks for the post. :)

    -chris

    • Thanks for the efforts, Chris. Glad to open up the feedback channels. Hopefully, some folks will chime in.