Social Media Target Strategies For A Better 2009
Social Media Target Strategies For A Better 2009
by
Jason Falls
Jason Falls

I’ve long been of the belief that the vast majority of social media thinkers and doers easily lapse into the self-gratifying bubble that is our little online world and forgets the primary audience to which we should speak lies not on Twitter or Facebook or blogs. We are good a sharing social media. We are better at stroking each other and the latter is easier to accomplish.

But what it accomplishes is little. I’ve said before that I feel we should spend less time talking to each other and more talking to the un-enlightened. I’ve made speaking commitments for 2009 at conferences and engagements outside my comfort zone for that very reason. The Social Media Club Louisville will take a decided direction on education, offering paid boot camps for non-profits, educators, public relations professionals and more this year. We will focus on the tools, the basics and getting to know social media so that when we do have events to talk strategy, we aren’t met with deer-in-headlights looks and cricket chirping.

But what can we do for our clients, our businesses and our immediate social media needs to get outside that box as well?

Forrester Researchs Social Technographics Ladder from Flickr.
Forrester Research's Social Technographics Ladder from Flickr.

Let’s start with Forrester’s now familiar Social Technographics Ladder. This image proposes Internet users are made up of six groups of participants: those who don’t participate in social sites; spectators who look, but nothing more; joiners who maintain profiles but don’t really get “into” it; collectors who will vote, add tags and maybe use RSS feeds but little else; critics who contribute comments, ratings, edit articles in a wiki and participate on other sites but not their own; and creators who publish their own materials.

According to Forrester’s 2008 statistics to fill in those roles, 21 percent of Internet users are now creators, up from 18 percent in 2007. Surprisingly, 25 percent are inactive, down dramatically from 44 percent in 2007. And an astonishing 69 percent are now spectators (up from 48 percent). All other categories increased as well.

Forrester Researchs Social Technographic Profile of U.S. Online Adults via Flickr
Forrester Research's Social Technographic Profile of U.S. Online Adults via Flickr

Here’s what these numbers mean to me and how they translate to actionable strategies for your 2009 social media activities.

  1. More people are adopting the social web as a regular activity.
  2. With almost 70 percent of all Internet users now watching what is happening on social sites, companies are now at a critical point in time in doing something meaningful there to capture those attentions.
  3. The traditional marketing mindset, however, seeks numbers, eyeballs, etc., so the programs developed are aimed at influencers hoping for the trickle-down and long-tail effects of “going viral.”
  4. This means the way we are approaching social media targeting is flawed.

Instead of developing programs to entice the creators or critics into talking about our companies, products or services, why don’t we develop ones that focus on the spectators and serve their needs? By giving them what they’re looking for, we connect our brand to their experience in a meaningful way. And frankly, if we do that, the creators and critics will follow.

It’s worth a shot, right?

Here’s a snippet of what I mean:

Let’s say you’re the brand manager for the Smart Car. You develop a lifestyle website around the Smart Car with content focused on green issues, other eco-friendly companies and programs, helpful tips and pointers to a green lifestyle, environmental event coverage, charity partnerships, etc. Think of it as a tree-hugger’s magazine online. (I don’t say “blog” because that’s the first word that turns most spectators — read: brand managers — off.) By giving the spectator the type of experience online they’re perhaps looking for, but also intertwining your very relevant brand into the content and messaging, you’re giving them something useful. By doing so, you enamor your brand with them and have a chance at sales, conversions, etc.

That’s just one idea and not one given a lot of thought. Imagine, Mr. or Mrs. Smart Car Brand Manager, what we could accomplish if I were fully functional, being paid and off my pain meds. (Heh.)

So my challenge to all of us in 2009 is to not stop thinking about the influencers, but start thinking about the larger audiences of people just toe-tipping the social web, too. Let’s give them something to consume, something to do, some people to interact with on behalf of the brand. Why does it have to be on an influencer’s blog? Why can’t it be on our dime, our time and our server? Let’s see what we can do to not scare them off and show them that we’ve been listening. We know you don’t want to be marketed to. We just want to welcome you to our new world where we talk, listen, share and collaborate.

If we do that, 2009 will be our best yet.

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About the Author

Jason Falls
Jason Falls is the founder of Social Media Explorer and one of the most notable and outspoken voices in the social media marketing industry. He is a noted marketing keynote speaker, author of two books and unapologetic bourbon aficionado. He can also be found at JasonFalls.com.
  • Chris

    We all seem to prefer to talk to others of like mind than to risk any amount of conflict. In recent years I've read that many towns and small cities are more and more voting predominately for one party or the other – because, as they say, birds of a feather flock together. Is it no wonder partisanship in politics has become more solidified? I think of this when you say “we should spend less time talking with each other and more time talking with the un-enlightened.” In activist circles, this is called “preaching to the choir.” What point is there in “stroking each other,” rather than going outside our comfort zone and engaging in honest dialogue? You said it, “it accomplishes little,” and I couldn't agree more.
    I really like the idea of interactive content that spreads the ability for more people to engage in the sites they visit, while I also think that this effort must allow for minimal participation. The other day I went to a website of a well-known company and was asked to participate in a “short” survey at the end of my visit. This “short” survey was still going on, and less than half completed, at about 5 minutes. This was too much time for me to invest in as I visited the site for help on something and needed to get back to that project.
    Chris Lindberg
    The

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  • Great article, this should be social media law for 2009 from your post “stop thinking about the influencers, but start thinking about the larger audiences of people just toe-tipping the social web, too. Let’s give them something to consume, something to do, some people to interact with on behalf of the brand”

    Wayne

  • Great article, this should be social media law for 2009 from your post “stop thinking about the influencers, but start thinking about the larger audiences of people just toe-tipping the social web, too. Let’s give them something to consume, something to do, some people to interact with on behalf of the brand”

    Wayne

  • Great article, this should be social media law for 2009 from your post “stop thinking about the influencers, but start thinking about the larger audiences of people just toe-tipping the social web, too. Let’s give them something to consume, something to do, some people to interact with on behalf of the brand”

    Wayne

  • Great article, this should be social media law for 2009 from your post “stop thinking about the influencers, but start thinking about the larger audiences of people just toe-tipping the social web, too. Let’s give them something to consume, something to do, some people to interact with on behalf of the brand”

    Wayne

  • Great article, this should be social media law for 2009 from your post “stop thinking about the influencers, but start thinking about the larger audiences of people just toe-tipping the social web, too. Let’s give them something to consume, something to do, some people to interact with on behalf of the brand”

    Wayne

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  • Jason – couldn't agree more. I was pleasantly surprised looking at the technographics that the audience is there from a spectator perspective. There is a great opportunity for a business to engage with this audience and I thought your case study on Caminito a few weeks back is a great example where they engaged on the topic of cooking to indirectly market the steakhouse.

  • Jason – couldn't agree more. I was pleasantly surprised looking at the technographics that the audience is there from a spectator perspective. There is a great opportunity for a business to engage with this audience and I thought your case study on Caminito a few weeks back is a great example where they engaged on the topic of cooking to indirectly market the steakhouse.

  • Jason – couldn't agree more. I was pleasantly surprised looking at the technographics that the audience is there from a spectator perspective. There is a great opportunity for a business to engage with this audience and I thought your case study on Caminito a few weeks back is a great example where they engaged on the topic of cooking to indirectly market the steakhouse.

  • Jason – couldn't agree more. I was pleasantly surprised looking at the technographics that the audience is there from a spectator perspective. There is a great opportunity for a business to engage with this audience and I thought your case study on Caminito a few weeks back is a great example where they engaged on the topic of cooking to indirectly market the steakhouse.

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  • I agree completely! They're the invisible people, all they need is a push:D

  • I agree completely! They're the invisible people, all they need is a push:D

  • I agree completely! They're the invisible people, all they need is a push:D

  • This is really true.

    Speaking in terms of blogs:
    We get tons of hits from people who might find value in what they've read however they don't comment or interact. The writer thinks that since there's not a bunch of people with signs promoting the blog, the content doesn't hold value. I've read a lot of blogs that I've taken notes on, including this one, where I didn't leave a comment. The reading opened my eyes but I didn't find the need to interact at that moment.

  • This is really true.

    Speaking in terms of blogs:
    We get tons of hits from people who might find value in what they've read however they don't comment or interact. The writer thinks that since there's not a bunch of people with signs promoting the blog, the content doesn't hold value. I've read a lot of blogs that I've taken notes on, including this one, where I didn't leave a comment. The reading opened my eyes but I didn't find the need to interact at that moment.

  • This is really true.

    Speaking in terms of blogs:
    We get tons of hits from people who might find value in what they've read however they don't comment or interact. The writer thinks that since there's not a bunch of people with signs promoting the blog, the content doesn't hold value. I've read a lot of blogs that I've taken notes on, including this one, where I didn't leave a comment. The reading opened my eyes but I didn't find the need to interact at that moment.

  • This is really true.

    Speaking in terms of blogs:
    We get tons of hits from people who might find value in what they've read however they don't comment or interact. The writer thinks that since there's not a bunch of people with signs promoting the blog, the content doesn't hold value. I've read a lot of blogs that I've taken notes on, including this one, where I didn't leave a comment. The reading opened my eyes but I didn't find the need to interact at that moment.

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  • Yeah, knocking down the base stereotypes still happens for some reason. Thanks for chiming in and fighting the good fight. Heh.

  • Yeah, knocking down the base stereotypes still happens for some reason. Thanks for chiming in and fighting the good fight. Heh.

  • Yeah, knocking down the base stereotypes still happens for some reason. Thanks for chiming in and fighting the good fight. Heh.

  • I completely agree. Most of my friends are not into social media and when I show them the use of some tools (Google Reader; Delicious), they are completely amazed. The image that many people have about social media is either the waste of time or all the possible dangers.

  • I completely agree. Most of my friends are not into social media and when I show them the use of some tools (Google Reader; Delicious), they are completely amazed. The image that many people have about social media is either the waste of time or all the possible dangers.

  • I completely agree. Most of my friends are not into social media and when I show them the use of some tools (Google Reader; Delicious), they are completely amazed. The image that many people have about social media is either the waste of time or all the possible dangers.

  • I completely agree. Most of my friends are not into social media and when I show them the use of some tools (Google Reader; Delicious), they are completely amazed. The image that many people have about social media is either the waste of time or all the possible dangers.

    • Yeah, knocking down the base stereotypes still happens for some reason. Thanks for chiming in and fighting the good fight. Heh.

  • Jason, as is sometimes the case in social media, I scanned and commented before reading. Pressed for time, I printed out the piece (don't tell) and read it this morning. That's called geezer bookmarking. Anyway, I agree with you about creating for the masses. My point is that when posters — who are part of the masses — go to your “Smart Car” site, they are the ones who will help propagate it, and assist others in their thinking, making the site more social and more useful. I'm all about bringing the web and web usability to the people, and I think you are too.

  • Jason, as is sometimes the case in social media, I scanned and commented before reading. Pressed for time, I printed out the piece (don't tell) and read it this morning. That's called geezer bookmarking. Anyway, I agree with you about creating for the masses. My point is that when posters — who are part of the masses — go to your “Smart Car” site, they are the ones who will help propagate it, and assist others in their thinking, making the site more social and more useful. I'm all about bringing the web and web usability to the people, and I think you are too.

  • Jason, as is sometimes the case in social media, I scanned and commented before reading. Pressed for time, I printed out the piece (don't tell) and read it this morning. That's called geezer bookmarking. Anyway, I agree with you about creating for the masses. My point is that when posters — who are part of the masses — go to your “Smart Car” site, they are the ones who will help propagate it, and assist others in their thinking, making the site more social and more useful. I'm all about bringing the web and web usability to the people, and I think you are too.

  • Thank you, Mr. Gill. I appreciate the input and compliments.

  • Thank you, Mr. Gill. I appreciate the input and compliments.

  • Thank you, Mr. Gill. I appreciate the input and compliments.

  • Welcoming the spectators into this new media world not only enlightens those who aren't familiar with it all but I think we're the ones who are getting the biggest lessons. Just as you said, you're pushing yourself outside of the box with different conferences and even with as much great content you push out on a daily basis, it'll help make it that much better with new insights and thought processes achieved just from teaching and talking with the spectators.

    Love the idea of pushing the boundaries and will be sure to adhere to that in my 2009 goals.

    Great thoughts here, Jason.

  • Welcoming the spectators into this new media world not only enlightens those who aren't familiar with it all but I think we're the ones who are getting the biggest lessons. Just as you said, you're pushing yourself outside of the box with different conferences and even with as much great content you push out on a daily basis, it'll help make it that much better with new insights and thought processes achieved just from teaching and talking with the spectators.

    Love the idea of pushing the boundaries and will be sure to adhere to that in my 2009 goals.

    Great thoughts here, Jason.

  • Welcoming the spectators into this new media world not only enlightens those who aren't familiar with it all but I think we're the ones who are getting the biggest lessons. Just as you said, you're pushing yourself outside of the box with different conferences and even with as much great content you push out on a daily basis, it'll help make it that much better with new insights and thought processes achieved just from teaching and talking with the spectators.

    Love the idea of pushing the boundaries and will be sure to adhere to that in my 2009 goals.

    Great thoughts here, Jason.

  • Welcoming the spectators into this new media world not only enlightens those who aren't familiar with it all but I think we're the ones who are getting the biggest lessons. Just as you said, you're pushing yourself outside of the box with different conferences and even with as much great content you push out on a daily basis, it'll help make it that much better with new insights and thought processes achieved just from teaching and talking with the spectators.

    Love the idea of pushing the boundaries and will be sure to adhere to that in my 2009 goals.

    Great thoughts here, Jason.

    • Thank you, Mr. Gill. I appreciate the input and compliments.

  • That's true. That being said, I think that we'll see a marriage of the two or a combination of both in companies' arsenals.

  • That's true. That being said, I think that we'll see a marriage of the two or a combination of both in companies' arsenals.

  • That's true. That being said, I think that we'll see a marriage of the two or a combination of both in companies' arsenals.

  • Agree on education. Not sure so much on Social Media Marketing overtaking SEO. Search is still the first place people go when looking to buy, so that will always have the brunt of the focus for marketers. While social media marketing can aide SEO and supplement it in powerful ways, good search is often times the place to start for businesses.

  • Agree on education. Not sure so much on Social Media Marketing overtaking SEO. Search is still the first place people go when looking to buy, so that will always have the brunt of the focus for marketers. While social media marketing can aide SEO and supplement it in powerful ways, good search is often times the place to start for businesses.

  • Agree on education. Not sure so much on Social Media Marketing overtaking SEO. Search is still the first place people go when looking to buy, so that will always have the brunt of the focus for marketers. While social media marketing can aide SEO and supplement it in powerful ways, good search is often times the place to start for businesses.

  • Amen to that. I look at social media as consumer advocacy, so you're right – we do have an impact on the world around us, even outside our bubble. Thanks for the comment.

  • Amen to that. I look at social media as consumer advocacy, so you're right – we do have an impact on the world around us, even outside our bubble. Thanks for the comment.

  • Amen to that. I look at social media as consumer advocacy, so you're right – we do have an impact on the world around us, even outside our bubble. Thanks for the comment.

  • Fair points Shaun. But I think social media marketing has evolved to dictate you market to influencers knowing that's where the eyeballs follow. My argument is to market to the eyeballs, becoming an influencer yourself. I'm sure we can slice it half a dozen ways, but you're right … it boils down to basic marketing.

    Thanks for the comment.

  • Fair points Shaun. But I think social media marketing has evolved to dictate you market to influencers knowing that's where the eyeballs follow. My argument is to market to the eyeballs, becoming an influencer yourself. I'm sure we can slice it half a dozen ways, but you're right … it boils down to basic marketing.

    Thanks for the comment.

  • Fair points Shaun. But I think social media marketing has evolved to dictate you market to influencers knowing that's where the eyeballs follow. My argument is to market to the eyeballs, becoming an influencer yourself. I'm sure we can slice it half a dozen ways, but you're right … it boils down to basic marketing.

    Thanks for the comment.

  • Not mad at all, Steve. Everyone is entitled to their take. I like your simple approach, too. Don't neccessarily agree, but am smiling at the thought of it. Thanks.

  • Not mad at all, Steve. Everyone is entitled to their take. I like your simple approach, too. Don't neccessarily agree, but am smiling at the thought of it. Thanks.

  • Not mad at all, Steve. Everyone is entitled to their take. I like your simple approach, too. Don't neccessarily agree, but am smiling at the thought of it. Thanks.

  • Thanks for pointing us to folks. I'll email you with contact info directly!

  • Thanks for pointing us to folks. I'll email you with contact info directly!

  • Thanks for pointing us to folks. I'll email you with contact info directly!

  • Appreciate the resource point. I assume, however, from the completely irrelevant nature of your comment you work for the publishing house or PR firm for the book. If not, it sure seems that way. Regardless, I don't mind people pointing to good resources here and will leave the comment.

  • I'm anxious more than ever, Elizabeth, to talk to new industries, verticals and disciplines about social media. Financial services, healthcare, government, industrial sector … there are endless possibilities and opportunities out there. I'm just hoping for a chance to start the conversation. Hopefully, posts like this and people like you spreading the world will give one of us a crack at 'em.

    Thanks for the comment.

  • I'm anxious more than ever, Elizabeth, to talk to new industries, verticals and disciplines about social media. Financial services, healthcare, government, industrial sector … there are endless possibilities and opportunities out there. I'm just hoping for a chance to start the conversation. Hopefully, posts like this and people like you spreading the world will give one of us a crack at 'em.

    Thanks for the comment.

  • I'm anxious more than ever, Elizabeth, to talk to new industries, verticals and disciplines about social media. Financial services, healthcare, government, industrial sector … there are endless possibilities and opportunities out there. I'm just hoping for a chance to start the conversation. Hopefully, posts like this and people like you spreading the world will give one of us a crack at 'em.

    Thanks for the comment.

  • Echoing that, Tom. Nice thoughts.

  • Echoing that, Tom. Nice thoughts.

  • Echoing that, Tom. Nice thoughts.

  • Thanks as always, Geoff. I agree that the ladder is a bit rigid in comparison to reality, and I think it's different for people in different circumstances — you might be a lurker on SME, but an active participant somewhere else. You don't fit into one category at all times. But I do think it gives us at least some general buckets in which to put folks.

    High road it is.

  • Thanks as always, Geoff. I agree that the ladder is a bit rigid in comparison to reality, and I think it's different for people in different circumstances — you might be a lurker on SME, but an active participant somewhere else. You don't fit into one category at all times. But I do think it gives us at least some general buckets in which to put folks.

    High road it is.

  • Thanks as always, Geoff. I agree that the ladder is a bit rigid in comparison to reality, and I think it's different for people in different circumstances — you might be a lurker on SME, but an active participant somewhere else. You don't fit into one category at all times. But I do think it gives us at least some general buckets in which to put folks.

    High road it is.

  • True, and but also taking yourself out of the “brand all the time” mode and building something for consumers around the brand that keeps the engaged and interested. I sat in on a PR planning session for a client today and all they wanted to talk about was talking points and the product. I actually said, “What if we talk about something peripheral to the product to liven it up a bit?” Go the deer in headlights look. Oh well.

  • True, and but also taking yourself out of the “brand all the time” mode and building something for consumers around the brand that keeps the engaged and interested. I sat in on a PR planning session for a client today and all they wanted to talk about was talking points and the product. I actually said, “What if we talk about something peripheral to the product to liven it up a bit?” Go the deer in headlights look. Oh well.

  • True, and but also taking yourself out of the “brand all the time” mode and building something for consumers around the brand that keeps the engaged and interested. I sat in on a PR planning session for a client today and all they wanted to talk about was talking points and the product. I actually said, “What if we talk about something peripheral to the product to liven it up a bit?” Go the deer in headlights look. Oh well.

  • You're welcome and thank you.

  • You're welcome and thank you.

  • You're welcome and thank you.

  • Thank you for commenting.

  • Thank you for commenting.

  • Thank you for commenting.

  • Thanks for chiming in, Bonnie.

  • Thanks for chiming in, Bonnie.

  • Thanks for chiming in, Bonnie.

  • Amen to that, Alasdair. Walking the balance between learning from each other yet teaching the unconverted has proven to be a challenge for us all.

  • Amen to that, Alasdair. Walking the balance between learning from each other yet teaching the unconverted has proven to be a challenge for us all.

  • Amen to that, Alasdair. Walking the balance between learning from each other yet teaching the unconverted has proven to be a challenge for us all.

  • Nice example, Linda. I wonder if your SingularCity friends might see some traction in converting folks if they focused on the lurkers and tried to find ways to engage them? Curious.

  • Nice example, Linda. I wonder if your SingularCity friends might see some traction in converting folks if they focused on the lurkers and tried to find ways to engage them? Curious.

  • Nice example, Linda. I wonder if your SingularCity friends might see some traction in converting folks if they focused on the lurkers and tried to find ways to engage them? Curious.

  • I would certainly concur, Tom. In fact, Twitter in many ways is the playground of social media whereas blogs, forums, online communities and what-not are where the goods are for businesses. While there are some solid business uses for Twitter, it's just one small piece in a large puzzle, and one that not everyone needs to complete it.

  • I would certainly concur, Tom. In fact, Twitter in many ways is the playground of social media whereas blogs, forums, online communities and what-not are where the goods are for businesses. While there are some solid business uses for Twitter, it's just one small piece in a large puzzle, and one that not everyone needs to complete it.

  • I would certainly concur, Tom. In fact, Twitter in many ways is the playground of social media whereas blogs, forums, online communities and what-not are where the goods are for businesses. While there are some solid business uses for Twitter, it's just one small piece in a large puzzle, and one that not everyone needs to complete it.

  • Thank you Christian. Hopefully we can use this type of thinking to further educate our clients moving forward. Appreciate the comments.

  • Thank you Christian. Hopefully we can use this type of thinking to further educate our clients moving forward. Appreciate the comments.

  • Thank you Christian. Hopefully we can use this type of thinking to further educate our clients moving forward. Appreciate the comments.

  • angelasiefer

    Nice post. Its easy for anyone in any industry to talk to others in that industry. Social media folks are no different. The difference is that since social media has such a great value for society, us not talking to those who are hesitant or uncertain impacts the world around us.

  • angelasiefer

    Nice post. Its easy for anyone in any industry to talk to others in that industry. Social media folks are no different. The difference is that since social media has such a great value for society, us not talking to those who are hesitant or uncertain impacts the world around us.

  • angelasiefer

    Nice post. Its easy for anyone in any industry to talk to others in that industry. Social media folks are no different. The difference is that since social media has such a great value for society, us not talking to those who are hesitant or uncertain impacts the world around us.

  • angelasiefer

    Nice post. Its easy for anyone in any industry to talk to others in that industry. Social media folks are no different. The difference is that since social media has such a great value for society, us not talking to those who are hesitant or uncertain impacts the world around us.

    • Amen to that. I look at social media as consumer advocacy, so you're right – we do have an impact on the world around us, even outside our bubble. Thanks for the comment.

  • Jason, Great post. You really hit the nail on the head. I think that Social Media Marketing is going to overtake SEO very soon, maybe even this year. It's our job as social media marketers to educate those who aren't aware of the power of Social Media.

    Keep up the great posts!

    Seth Goldstein
    Principal
    Goldstein Media LLC
    http://www.goldsteinmedia.com – Website
    http://www.sethgoldstein.net – Blog
    http://www.twitter.com/sethgoldstein – Twitter

    Social Media Marketing/Web Design/Search Engine Optimization

  • Jason, Great post. You really hit the nail on the head. I think that Social Media Marketing is going to overtake SEO very soon, maybe even this year. It's our job as social media marketers to educate those who aren't aware of the power of Social Media.

    Keep up the great posts!

    Seth Goldstein
    Principal
    Goldstein Media LLC
    http://www.goldsteinmedia.com – Website
    http://www.sethgoldstein.net – Blog
    http://www.twitter.com/sethgoldstein – Twitter

    Social Media Marketing/Web Design/Search Engine Optimization

  • Jason, Great post. You really hit the nail on the head. I think that Social Media Marketing is going to overtake SEO very soon, maybe even this year. It's our job as social media marketers to educate those who aren't aware of the power of Social Media.

    Keep up the great posts!

    Seth Goldstein
    Principal
    Goldstein Media LLC
    http://www.goldsteinmedia.com – Website
    http://www.sethgoldstein.net – Blog
    http://www.twitter.com/sethgoldstein – Twitter

    Social Media Marketing/Web Design/Search Engine Optimization

  • Jason, Great post. You really hit the nail on the head. I think that Social Media Marketing is going to overtake SEO very soon, maybe even this year. It's our job as social media marketers to educate those who aren't aware of the power of Social Media.

    Keep up the great posts!

    Seth Goldstein
    Principal
    Goldstein Media LLC
    http://www.goldsteinmedia.com – Website
    http://www.sethgoldstein.net – Blog
    http://www.twitter.com/sethgoldstein – Twitter

    Social Media Marketing/Web Design/Search Engine Optimization

    • Agree on education. Not sure so much on Social Media Marketing overtaking SEO. Search is still the first place people go when looking to buy, so that will always have the brunt of the focus for marketers. While social media marketing can aide SEO and supplement it in powerful ways, good search is often times the place to start for businesses.

      • That's true. That being said, I think that we'll see a marriage of the two or a combination of both in companies' arsenals.

  • Great post and on target. However, this is really Marketing 101. That is marketing (brand managers, product managers) are all about the problems that their products / services solve for their customers and segments.

    Serious marketers don't spend time with influencers, unless, and this is important, doing so drives the metrics that they are accountable for (revenue, profit, margin, growth targets, customer sat) etc..

    Who are you selling to?
    Where are they?
    What problems / pain ponts are you solving?
    What messages resonate with them?

    Shaun Dakin
    @EndTheRobocalls (business)
    @IsCool (personal)
    @FakeObama44 (fun)

  • shimane

    Great post and on target. However, this is really Marketing 101. That is marketing (brand managers, product managers) are all about the problems that their products / services solve for their customers and segments.

    Serious marketers don't spend time with influencers, unless, and this is important, doing so drives the metrics that they are accountable for (revenue, profit, margin, growth targets, customer sat) etc..

    Who are you selling to?
    Where are they?
    What problems / pain ponts are you solving?
    What messages resonate with them?

    Shaun Dakin
    @EndTheRobocalls (business)
    @IsCool (personal)
    @FakeObama44 (fun)

  • shimane

    Great post and on target. However, this is really Marketing 101. That is marketing (brand managers, product managers) are all about the problems that their products / services solve for their customers and segments.

    Serious marketers don't spend time with influencers, unless, and this is important, doing so drives the metrics that they are accountable for (revenue, profit, margin, growth targets, customer sat) etc..

    Who are you selling to?
    Where are they?
    What problems / pain ponts are you solving?
    What messages resonate with them?

    Shaun Dakin
    @EndTheRobocalls (business)
    @IsCool (personal)
    @FakeObama44 (fun)

  • shimane

    Great post and on target. However, this is really Marketing 101. That is marketing (brand managers, product managers) are all about the problems that their products / services solve for their customers and segments.

    Serious marketers don't spend time with influencers, unless, and this is important, doing so drives the metrics that they are accountable for (revenue, profit, margin, growth targets, customer sat) etc..

    Who are you selling to?
    Where are they?
    What problems / pain ponts are you solving?
    What messages resonate with them?

    Shaun Dakin
    @EndTheRobocalls (business)
    @IsCool (personal)
    @FakeObama44 (fun)

    • Fair points Shaun. But I think social media marketing has evolved to dictate you market to influencers knowing that's where the eyeballs follow. My argument is to market to the eyeballs, becoming an influencer yourself. I'm sure we can slice it half a dozen ways, but you're right … it boils down to basic marketing.

      Thanks for the comment.

  • Please don't be mad, but I've never been a fan of the 6 rung ladder espoused by Forrester (Charlene and Josh). I'm a simple man and like to think there are really only two kinds of social media-ists. Posters and Pasters. Reach the posters, you win!

  • Please don't be mad, but I've never been a fan of the 6 rung ladder espoused by Forrester (Charlene and Josh). I'm a simple man and like to think there are really only two kinds of social media-ists. Posters and Pasters. Reach the posters, you win!

  • Please don't be mad, but I've never been a fan of the 6 rung ladder espoused by Forrester (Charlene and Josh). I'm a simple man and like to think there are really only two kinds of social media-ists. Posters and Pasters. Reach the posters, you win!

  • Please don't be mad, but I've never been a fan of the 6 rung ladder espoused by Forrester (Charlene and Josh). I'm a simple man and like to think there are really only two kinds of social media-ists. Posters and Pasters. Reach the posters, you win!

    • Not mad at all, Steve. Everyone is entitled to their take. I like your simple approach, too. Don't neccessarily agree, but am smiling at the thought of it. Thanks.

      • Jason, as is sometimes the case in social media, I scanned and commented before reading. Pressed for time, I printed out the piece (don't tell) and read it this morning. That's called geezer bookmarking. Anyway, I agree with you about creating for the masses. My point is that when posters — who are part of the masses — go to your “Smart Car” site, they are the ones who will help propagate it, and assist others in their thinking, making the site more social and more useful. I'm all about bringing the web and web usability to the people, and I think you are too.

  • I agree with Geoff on this one. Technographics (like demographics) lacks the flexibility to describe how people really behave. I am a creator and influencer in a couple of small domains, but much more likely to be a spectator in most other domains.

    In other words my personal Technographics Profile is VERY domain specific. Good luck using that information to target me with a marketing initiative.

    Another approach that we are beginning to use is to segment specific communities into different roles (maven, participant, newbie, spectator) and then do differential analysis of motivations and issues by role. Believe me that mavens have very different community participation motivations than newbies.

    Tom O'Brien

    Tom O'Brien

  • I agree with Geoff on this one. Technographics (like demographics) lacks the flexibility to describe how people really behave. I am a creator and influencer in a couple of small domains, but much more likely to be a spectator in most other domains.

    In other words my personal Technographics Profile is VERY domain specific. Good luck using that information to target me with a marketing initiative.

    Another approach that we are beginning to use is to segment specific communities into different roles (maven, participant, newbie, spectator) and then do differential analysis of motivations and issues by role. Believe me that mavens have very different community participation motivations than newbies.

    Tom O'Brien

    Tom O'Brien

  • I agree with Geoff on this one. Technographics (like demographics) lacks the flexibility to describe how people really behave. I am a creator and influencer in a couple of small domains, but much more likely to be a spectator in most other domains.

    In other words my personal Technographics Profile is VERY domain specific. Good luck using that information to target me with a marketing initiative.

    Another approach that we are beginning to use is to segment specific communities into different roles (maven, participant, newbie, spectator) and then do differential analysis of motivations and issues by role. Believe me that mavens have very different community participation motivations than newbies.

    Tom O'Brien

    Tom O'Brien

  • Patrick:

    The web only looks like an advertising platform if you are an advertiser.

    To me the internet looks like the world's greatest information source. I no longer need marketers because I can connect to my like minded peers around the world to help me decide which digital camera, car, and big screen tv to buy. I no longer have my news filtered by the NYT or WSJ editorial staff, I decide who and what to read.

    Marketers who get this can take advantage of it by becoming part of the solution (making the internet MORE useful to people) instead of part of the problem (cluttering it up with more ads).

    Tom O'Brien

  • Patrick:

    The web only looks like an advertising platform if you are an advertiser.

    To me the internet looks like the world's greatest information source. I no longer need marketers because I can connect to my like minded peers around the world to help me decide which digital camera, car, and big screen tv to buy. I no longer have my news filtered by the NYT or WSJ editorial staff, I decide who and what to read.

    Marketers who get this can take advantage of it by becoming part of the solution (making the internet MORE useful to people) instead of part of the problem (cluttering it up with more ads).

    Tom O'Brien

  • Patrick:

    The web only looks like an advertising platform if you are an advertiser.

    To me the internet looks like the world's greatest information source. I no longer need marketers because I can connect to my like minded peers around the world to help me decide which digital camera, car, and big screen tv to buy. I no longer have my news filtered by the NYT or WSJ editorial staff, I decide who and what to read.

    Marketers who get this can take advantage of it by becoming part of the solution (making the internet MORE useful to people) instead of part of the problem (cluttering it up with more ads).

    Tom O'Brien

  • Jason:

    Nice post. We have to talk – because we have done over 200 projects for large marketers – none of which are using twitter – but all of which are using the insight and implications in a variety of branding, communication and product development initiatives.

    SM isn't just about twitter, in fact in most of our projects more than 95% of the content we collect comes from forums, newsgroups and communities. The other 5% from blogs, socnets and other.

    Conversation, community, connections are where the action is.

    Tom O'Brien

  • Jason:

    Nice post. We have to talk – because we have done over 200 projects for large marketers – none of which are using twitter – but all of which are using the insight and implications in a variety of branding, communication and product development initiatives.

    SM isn't just about twitter, in fact in most of our projects more than 95% of the content we collect comes from forums, newsgroups and communities. The other 5% from blogs, socnets and other.

    Conversation, community, connections are where the action is.

    Tom O'Brien

  • Jason:

    Nice post. We have to talk – because we have done over 200 projects for large marketers – none of which are using twitter – but all of which are using the insight and implications in a variety of branding, communication and product development initiatives.

    SM isn't just about twitter, in fact in most of our projects more than 95% of the content we collect comes from forums, newsgroups and communities. The other 5% from blogs, socnets and other.

    Conversation, community, connections are where the action is.

    Tom O'Brien

  • Jason:

    Nice post. We have to talk – because we have done over 200 projects for large marketers – none of which are using twitter – but all of which are using the insight and implications in a variety of branding, communication and product development initiatives.

    SM isn't just about twitter, in fact in most of our projects more than 95% of the content we collect comes from forums, newsgroups and communities. The other 5% from blogs, socnets and other.

    Conversation, community, connections are where the action is.

    Tom O'Brien

    • I would certainly concur, Tom. In fact, Twitter in many ways is the playground of social media whereas blogs, forums, online communities and what-not are where the goods are for businesses. While there are some solid business uses for Twitter, it's just one small piece in a large puzzle, and one that not everyone needs to complete it.

  • Great Insight, Jason. As someone who has only been in the Social Media field for a few years now (with a company out of NYC called Carrot Creative) I have been looking for an adequate way to express to a lot of perspective clients how they should go about utilizing social media and not be so driven by quantitative results. Often this results in a few communication barriers with clients and friends accustomed to traditional marketing principles for a non-traditional social media world. I found your piece helpful in breaking some of those barriers. Thank you.

  • Great Insight, Jason. As someone who has only been in the Social Media field for a few years now (with a company out of NYC called Carrot Creative) I have been looking for an adequate way to express to a lot of perspective clients how they should go about utilizing social media and not be so driven by quantitative results. Often this results in a few communication barriers with clients and friends accustomed to traditional marketing principles for a non-traditional social media world. I found your piece helpful in breaking some of those barriers. Thank you.

  • Great Insight, Jason. As someone who has only been in the Social Media field for a few years now (with a company out of NYC called Carrot Creative) I have been looking for an adequate way to express to a lot of perspective clients how they should go about utilizing social media and not be so driven by quantitative results. Often this results in a few communication barriers with clients and friends accustomed to traditional marketing principles for a non-traditional social media world. I found your piece helpful in breaking some of those barriers. Thank you.

  • Great Insight, Jason. As someone who has only been in the Social Media field for a few years now (with a company out of NYC called Carrot Creative) I have been looking for an adequate way to express to a lot of perspective clients how they should go about utilizing social media and not be so driven by quantitative results. Often this results in a few communication barriers with clients and friends accustomed to traditional marketing principles for a non-traditional social media world. I found your piece helpful in breaking some of those barriers. Thank you.

    • Thank you Christian. Hopefully we can use this type of thinking to further educate our clients moving forward. Appreciate the comments.

  • excellent article. we will push it to our Bloghology Social Network members/users.

    PS. Jason when you get some time please send me your contact info details.

  • excellent article. we will push it to our Bloghology Social Network members/users.

    PS. Jason when you get some time please send me your contact info details.

  • excellent article. we will push it to our Bloghology Social Network members/users.

    PS. Jason when you get some time please send me your contact info details.

  • excellent article. we will push it to our Bloghology Social Network members/users.

    PS. Jason when you get some time please send me your contact info details.

    • Thanks for pointing us to folks. I'll email you with contact info directly!

  • Joanne

    I just had the pleasure to listen to nearly 50 interviews with the top SVPs and founders of the major social media companies world wide; Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, Twitter, LinkedIn, MySpace, etc. for a new book, The Social Media Bible authored by Lon Safko and published by John Wiley & Sons. http:www.TheSocialMediaBible.com/download/ They are 30+/- minute podcasts about how each social media technology is being used for business. What a great resource!”

    I urge you to take a look/listen!!!!!

  • Pingback: The Big List of 2009 Marketing Predictions « Itjbmarketing’s Blog()

  • elizabethsosnow

    Jason, I really enjoyed this post. I think many, many of our clients fall into the “tip-toe” space. You crystallized the opportunity very well.

    Have you considered.targeted industries that may be particularly ripe for approach? From my perspective, Financial Services folks need to hear how Social Media can benefit them, even without a blog. In fact, I am having a conversation right now with a client on this very subject.

    Hope your heatlh is improving and look forward to learning more from you,

    Elizabeth Sosnow

  • elizabethsosnow

    Jason, I really enjoyed this post. I think many, many of our clients fall into the “tip-toe” space. You crystallized the opportunity very well.

    Have you considered.targeted industries that may be particularly ripe for approach? From my perspective, Financial Services folks need to hear how Social Media can benefit them, even without a blog. In fact, I am having a conversation right now with a client on this very subject.

    Hope your heatlh is improving and look forward to learning more from you,

    Elizabeth Sosnow

  • elizabethsosnow

    Jason, I really enjoyed this post. I think many, many of our clients fall into the “tip-toe” space. You crystallized the opportunity very well.

    Have you considered.targeted industries that may be particularly ripe for approach? From my perspective, Financial Services folks need to hear how Social Media can benefit them, even without a blog. In fact, I am having a conversation right now with a client on this very subject.

    Hope your heatlh is improving and look forward to learning more from you,

    Elizabeth Sosnow

  • elizabethsosnow

    Jason, I really enjoyed this post. I think many, many of our clients fall into the “tip-toe” space. You crystallized the opportunity very well.

    Have you considered.targeted industries that may be particularly ripe for approach? From my perspective, Financial Services folks need to hear how Social Media can benefit them, even without a blog. In fact, I am having a conversation right now with a client on this very subject.

    Hope your heatlh is improving and look forward to learning more from you,

    Elizabeth Sosnow

    • I'm anxious more than ever, Elizabeth, to talk to new industries, verticals and disciplines about social media. Financial services, healthcare, government, industrial sector … there are endless possibilities and opportunities out there. I'm just hoping for a chance to start the conversation. Hopefully, posts like this and people like you spreading the world will give one of us a crack at 'em.

      Thanks for the comment.

  • Jason, I think you may be on to something. I have not really commented or blogged about the technographic ladder, in large part because while it's an interesting taxonomy, it doesn't seem to fit. I think social media participants of all types are much more fluid than this. What that means is another thing, but keep on the high road with this one!

  • Jason, I think you may be on to something. I have not really commented or blogged about the technographic ladder, in large part because while it's an interesting taxonomy, it doesn't seem to fit. I think social media participants of all types are much more fluid than this. What that means is another thing, but keep on the high road with this one!

  • Jason, I think you may be on to something. I have not really commented or blogged about the technographic ladder, in large part because while it's an interesting taxonomy, it doesn't seem to fit. I think social media participants of all types are much more fluid than this. What that means is another thing, but keep on the high road with this one!

  • Jason, I think you may be on to something. I have not really commented or blogged about the technographic ladder, in large part because while it's an interesting taxonomy, it doesn't seem to fit. I think social media participants of all types are much more fluid than this. What that means is another thing, but keep on the high road with this one!

    • I agree with Geoff on this one. Technographics (like demographics) lacks the flexibility to describe how people really behave. I am a creator and influencer in a couple of small domains, but much more likely to be a spectator in most other domains.

      In other words my personal Technographics Profile is VERY domain specific. Good luck using that information to target me with a marketing initiative.

      Another approach that we are beginning to use is to segment specific communities into different roles (maven, participant, newbie, spectator) and then do differential analysis of motivations and issues by role. Believe me that mavens have very different community participation motivations than newbies.

      Tom O'Brien

      Tom O'Brien

    • Thanks as always, Geoff. I agree that the ladder is a bit rigid in comparison to reality, and I think it's different for people in different circumstances — you might be a lurker on SME, but an active participant somewhere else. You don't fit into one category at all times. But I do think it gives us at least some general buckets in which to put folks.

      High road it is.

  • Though leading insight as always, Jason. It sounds like what you're really saying is push our brand clients to start to talk more like influencers rather than marketers by creating content that's of interest to their audience but not all focused on their own products. I guess the delicate balancing act is how much “brand” placement / intertwining occurs.

  • Though leading insight as always, Jason. It sounds like what you're really saying is push our brand clients to start to talk more like influencers rather than marketers by creating content that's of interest to their audience but not all focused on their own products. I guess the delicate balancing act is how much “brand” placement / intertwining occurs.

  • Though leading insight as always, Jason. It sounds like what you're really saying is push our brand clients to start to talk more like influencers rather than marketers by creating content that's of interest to their audience but not all focused on their own products. I guess the delicate balancing act is how much “brand” placement / intertwining occurs.

  • Though leading insight as always, Jason. It sounds like what you're really saying is push our brand clients to start to talk more like influencers rather than marketers by creating content that's of interest to their audience but not all focused on their own products. I guess the delicate balancing act is how much “brand” placement / intertwining occurs.

    • True, and but also taking yourself out of the “brand all the time” mode and building something for consumers around the brand that keeps the engaged and interested. I sat in on a PR planning session for a client today and all they wanted to talk about was talking points and the product. I actually said, “What if we talk about something peripheral to the product to liven it up a bit?” Go the deer in headlights look. Oh well.

  • Always appreciate hearing your perspective, Jason. Completely agree that companies need to be in the content business. You have to give people – influencers or otherwise – something to engage with.

    I also like the human element of this line: “Let’s give them something to consume, something to do, some people to interact with on behalf of the brand.” The human connection can't be overestimated in social.

    Thanks for the post.

  • Always appreciate hearing your perspective, Jason. Completely agree that companies need to be in the content business. You have to give people – influencers or otherwise – something to engage with.

    I also like the human element of this line: “Let’s give them something to consume, something to do, some people to interact with on behalf of the brand.” The human connection can't be overestimated in social.

    Thanks for the post.

  • Always appreciate hearing your perspective, Jason. Completely agree that companies need to be in the content business. You have to give people – influencers or otherwise – something to engage with.

    I also like the human element of this line: “Let’s give them something to consume, something to do, some people to interact with on behalf of the brand.” The human connection can't be overestimated in social.

    Thanks for the post.

  • Always appreciate hearing your perspective, Jason. Completely agree that companies need to be in the content business. You have to give people – influencers or otherwise – something to engage with.

    I also like the human element of this line: “Let’s give them something to consume, something to do, some people to interact with on behalf of the brand.” The human connection can't be overestimated in social.

    Thanks for the post.

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  • Thanks for the great post. Developing content that gets spectators engaged is what it's all about; use insight to do it right. then have fun building it.

  • Thanks for the great post. Developing content that gets spectators engaged is what it's all about; use insight to do it right. then have fun building it.

  • Thanks for the great post. Developing content that gets spectators engaged is what it's all about; use insight to do it right. then have fun building it.

  • Thanks for the great post. Developing content that gets spectators engaged is what it's all about; use insight to do it right. then have fun building it.

  • Great post, thanks!

  • Great post, thanks!

  • Great post, thanks!

  • Great post, thanks!

  • Jason. I was sketching out a blog post along the similar lines, but, you have said it all here. I love twitter and other social media sites and feed off peoples ideas and thoughts, however there is a sense that we are all refining our content to an extent where we all are impressed with each other. We further our understanding through dialogue to the extent where we run the risk of leaving the unconverted behind. It makes it harder to talk to them as we feel we are regressing when we have to use simple language or ideas and explain concepts that seem so obvious to us.

    Still, we are of little use to our audience if we do not seek to understand our subject through dialogue with like minded professional people. The trick is, as you say, remembering to take what we have learned and present it to our audience in a manner that fosters understanding and leads to action.

  • Jason. I was sketching out a blog post along the similar lines, but, you have said it all here. I love twitter and other social media sites and feed off peoples ideas and thoughts, however there is a sense that we are all refining our content to an extent where we all are impressed with each other. We further our understanding through dialogue to the extent where we run the risk of leaving the unconverted behind. It makes it harder to talk to them as we feel we are regressing when we have to use simple language or ideas and explain concepts that seem so obvious to us.

    Still, we are of little use to our audience if we do not seek to understand our subject through dialogue with like minded professional people. The trick is, as you say, remembering to take what we have learned and present it to our audience in a manner that fosters understanding and leads to action.

  • Jason. I was sketching out a blog post along the similar lines, but, you have said it all here. I love twitter and other social media sites and feed off peoples ideas and thoughts, however there is a sense that we are all refining our content to an extent where we all are impressed with each other. We further our understanding through dialogue to the extent where we run the risk of leaving the unconverted behind. It makes it harder to talk to them as we feel we are regressing when we have to use simple language or ideas and explain concepts that seem so obvious to us.

    Still, we are of little use to our audience if we do not seek to understand our subject through dialogue with like minded professional people. The trick is, as you say, remembering to take what we have learned and present it to our audience in a manner that fosters understanding and leads to action.

  • Jason. I was sketching out a blog post along the similar lines, but, you have said it all here. I love twitter and other social media sites and feed off peoples ideas and thoughts, however there is a sense that we are all refining our content to an extent where we all are impressed with each other. We further our understanding through dialogue to the extent where we run the risk of leaving the unconverted behind. It makes it harder to talk to them as we feel we are regressing when we have to use simple language or ideas and explain concepts that seem so obvious to us.

    Still, we are of little use to our audience if we do not seek to understand our subject through dialogue with like minded professional people. The trick is, as you say, remembering to take what we have learned and present it to our audience in a manner that fosters understanding and leads to action.

    • Amen to that, Alasdair. Walking the balance between learning from each other yet teaching the unconverted has proven to be a challenge for us all.

  • Great reminder, Jason.

    You have hit on a favorite topic of my good friend, Marsha Collier (@cre8ive), who has written 30+ EBay for Dummies books. She is very clear on who her audience is and keeps reminding me that we are “talking to each other” when I refer to social media luminaries.

    I had the pleasure of seeing Jeremiah Owyang present the ladder at On Market World in San Francisco last year. Looking through the demographics in the Forrester statistics is very valuable. I particularly found it interesting for my client that has a community for affluent 30+ in Los Angeles (http://SingularCity.com). Though 70,000+ are reading Singular magazine, given their demographic, they may like to browse the website but only a limited percentage will join the on-line community and even fewer will return daily to participate.

  • Great reminder, Jason.

    You have hit on a favorite topic of my good friend, Marsha Collier (@cre8ive), who has written 30+ EBay for Dummies books. She is very clear on who her audience is and keeps reminding me that we are “talking to each other” when I refer to social media luminaries.

    I had the pleasure of seeing Jeremiah Owyang present the ladder at On Market World in San Francisco last year. Looking through the demographics in the Forrester statistics is very valuable. I particularly found it interesting for my client that has a community for affluent 30+ in Los Angeles (http://SingularCity.com). Though 70,000+ are reading Singular magazine, given their demographic, they may like to browse the website but only a limited percentage will join the on-line community and even fewer will return daily to participate.

  • Great reminder, Jason.

    You have hit on a favorite topic of my good friend, Marsha Collier (@cre8ive), who has written 30+ EBay for Dummies books. She is very clear on who her audience is and keeps reminding me that we are “talking to each other” when I refer to social media luminaries.

    I had the pleasure of seeing Jeremiah Owyang present the ladder at On Market World in San Francisco last year. Looking through the demographics in the Forrester statistics is very valuable. I particularly found it interesting for my client that has a community for affluent 30+ in Los Angeles (http://SingularCity.com). Though 70,000+ are reading Singular magazine, given their demographic, they may like to browse the website but only a limited percentage will join the on-line community and even fewer will return daily to participate.

  • Great reminder, Jason.

    You have hit on a favorite topic of my good friend, Marsha Collier (@cre8ive), who has written 30+ EBay for Dummies books. She is very clear on who her audience is and keeps reminding me that we are “talking to each other” when I refer to social media luminaries.

    I had the pleasure of seeing Jeremiah Owyang present the ladder at On Market World in San Francisco last year. Looking through the demographics in the Forrester statistics is very valuable. I particularly found it interesting for my client that has a community for affluent 30+ in Los Angeles (http://SingularCity.com). Though 70,000+ are reading Singular magazine, given their demographic, they may like to browse the website but only a limited percentage will join the on-line community and even fewer will return daily to participate.

    • Nice example, Linda. I wonder if your SingularCity friends might see some traction in converting folks if they focused on the lurkers and tried to find ways to engage them? Curious.

  • Agreed, Greg. If those who advocate social media spend 2009 educating, we're all going to have better consumer experiences as a result. Here's to the good fight.

  • Agreed, Greg. If those who advocate social media spend 2009 educating, we're all going to have better consumer experiences as a result. Here's to the good fight.

  • Agreed, Greg. If those who advocate social media spend 2009 educating, we're all going to have better consumer experiences as a result. Here's to the good fight.

  • What's funny Danielle is that I don't think we have to go looking for them. They're there. They're watching. We just need to push that content for them. The folks who figure out how to make them come out of the woodwork because of the content will be the big winners soon.

  • What's funny Danielle is that I don't think we have to go looking for them. They're there. They're watching. We just need to push that content for them. The folks who figure out how to make them come out of the woodwork because of the content will be the big winners soon.

  • What's funny Danielle is that I don't think we have to go looking for them. They're there. They're watching. We just need to push that content for them. The folks who figure out how to make them come out of the woodwork because of the content will be the big winners soon.

  • Why, thank you, Kneale. I appreciate the kind words.

  • Why, thank you, Kneale. I appreciate the kind words.

  • Why, thank you, Kneale. I appreciate the kind words.

  • Thanks Patrick. I would push back a bit, though, in that I don't think of the web as an advertising platform. I see it as a communications platform. Advertising is one method that can happen here, but if we look at it as purely an advertising platform and miss the interpersonal connections and communications, we're not going to get the most out of it and the people we communicate with here will be turned off as we are just trying to sell them something. Yes, I mean this for companies as well as individuals. It's okay for a company to be here, communicating, and not have the intent to sell something. It makes them more real, relevant and in the long run, effective at doing what they ultimately want to to – sell. Ironic, hey?

    Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks Patrick. I would push back a bit, though, in that I don't think of the web as an advertising platform. I see it as a communications platform. Advertising is one method that can happen here, but if we look at it as purely an advertising platform and miss the interpersonal connections and communications, we're not going to get the most out of it and the people we communicate with here will be turned off as we are just trying to sell them something. Yes, I mean this for companies as well as individuals. It's okay for a company to be here, communicating, and not have the intent to sell something. It makes them more real, relevant and in the long run, effective at doing what they ultimately want to to – sell. Ironic, hey?

    Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks Patrick. I would push back a bit, though, in that I don't think of the web as an advertising platform. I see it as a communications platform. Advertising is one method that can happen here, but if we look at it as purely an advertising platform and miss the interpersonal connections and communications, we're not going to get the most out of it and the people we communicate with here will be turned off as we are just trying to sell them something. Yes, I mean this for companies as well as individuals. It's okay for a company to be here, communicating, and not have the intent to sell something. It makes them more real, relevant and in the long run, effective at doing what they ultimately want to to – sell. Ironic, hey?

    Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Yes, but self-congratulation is so much more fun! Seriously, as a business person who's keen to tap into the power of social media for my company, this post is a great reminder about what we REALLY need. And frankly, the start that you describe for the Louisville Social Media Club sounds like a good starting place for most companies too . . .

  • Yes, but self-congratulation is so much more fun! Seriously, as a business person who's keen to tap into the power of social media for my company, this post is a great reminder about what we REALLY need. And frankly, the start that you describe for the Louisville Social Media Club sounds like a good starting place for most companies too . . .

  • Yes, but self-congratulation is so much more fun! Seriously, as a business person who's keen to tap into the power of social media for my company, this post is a great reminder about what we REALLY need. And frankly, the start that you describe for the Louisville Social Media Club sounds like a good starting place for most companies too . . .

  • Yes, but self-congratulation is so much more fun! Seriously, as a business person who's keen to tap into the power of social media for my company, this post is a great reminder about what we REALLY need. And frankly, the start that you describe for the Louisville Social Media Club sounds like a good starting place for most companies too . . .

    • Agreed, Greg. If those who advocate social media spend 2009 educating, we're all going to have better consumer experiences as a result. Here's to the good fight.

  • Fantastic! Bravo! I'm telling everyone to read this, NOW!

    Here's to a great year for you, Jason! Here's to a great year for all doers.

    Cheers,

    km

  • Fantastic! Bravo! I'm telling everyone to read this, NOW!

    Here's to a great year for you, Jason! Here's to a great year for all doers.

    Cheers,

    km

  • Fantastic! Bravo! I'm telling everyone to read this, NOW!

    Here's to a great year for you, Jason! Here's to a great year for all doers.

    Cheers,

    km

  • Fantastic! Bravo! I'm telling everyone to read this, NOW!

    Here's to a great year for you, Jason! Here's to a great year for all doers.

    Cheers,

    km

    • Why, thank you, Kneale. I appreciate the kind words.

  • Thanks for this post Jason. It's a great point to be made that social media can't just be about influencers and the small community who love to talk about it. My big question and a challenge for all of us I'm sure is how to find those people who are toe-tipping and get them more actively involved. I know that offering valuable, interesting content is a start but I'm still discovering how to get to the outer fringes where they might be, beyond just the popular social networking sites.

  • Thanks for this post Jason. It's a great point to be made that social media can't just be about influencers and the small community who love to talk about it. My big question and a challenge for all of us I'm sure is how to find those people who are toe-tipping and get them more actively involved. I know that offering valuable, interesting content is a start but I'm still discovering how to get to the outer fringes where they might be, beyond just the popular social networking sites.

  • Thanks for this post Jason. It's a great point to be made that social media can't just be about influencers and the small community who love to talk about it. My big question and a challenge for all of us I'm sure is how to find those people who are toe-tipping and get them more actively involved. I know that offering valuable, interesting content is a start but I'm still discovering how to get to the outer fringes where they might be, beyond just the popular social networking sites.

  • Thanks for this post Jason. It's a great point to be made that social media can't just be about influencers and the small community who love to talk about it. My big question and a challenge for all of us I'm sure is how to find those people who are toe-tipping and get them more actively involved. I know that offering valuable, interesting content is a start but I'm still discovering how to get to the outer fringes where they might be, beyond just the popular social networking sites.

    • What's funny Danielle is that I don't think we have to go looking for them. They're there. They're watching. We just need to push that content for them. The folks who figure out how to make them come out of the woodwork because of the content will be the big winners soon.

      • I agree completely! They're the invisible people, all they need is a push:D

  • Great insights. If I hear you right, then it's time to stop playing and start utilizing the technology for something bigger than just an Tron-style coctail party. The question is: How do we translate vis a vis transform the social media technological landscape into something both meaningful and profitable? Today, the web is an advertising platform — and social media isn't really any different. It's enable companies to realize a near one-to-one marketing push. Yet, there's got to be a way to leverage the technology and distribution potential than the open market bizarre. Right now, that's what keeps me up at night.

  • Great insights. If I hear you right, then it's time to stop playing and start utilizing the technology for something bigger than just an Tron-style coctail party. The question is: How do we translate vis a vis transform the social media technological landscape into something both meaningful and profitable? Today, the web is an advertising platform — and social media isn't really any different. It's enable companies to realize a near one-to-one marketing push. Yet, there's got to be a way to leverage the technology and distribution potential than the open market bizarre. Right now, that's what keeps me up at night.

  • Great insights. If I hear you right, then it's time to stop playing and start utilizing the technology for something bigger than just an Tron-style coctail party. The question is: How do we translate vis a vis transform the social media technological landscape into something both meaningful and profitable? Today, the web is an advertising platform — and social media isn't really any different. It's enable companies to realize a near one-to-one marketing push. Yet, there's got to be a way to leverage the technology and distribution potential than the open market bizarre. Right now, that's what keeps me up at night.

  • Great insights. If I hear you right, then it's time to stop playing and start utilizing the technology for something bigger than just an Tron-style coctail party. The question is: How do we translate vis a vis transform the social media technological landscape into something both meaningful and profitable? Today, the web is an advertising platform — and social media isn't really any different. It's enable companies to realize a near one-to-one marketing push. Yet, there's got to be a way to leverage the technology and distribution potential than the open market bizarre. Right now, that's what keeps me up at night.

    • Thanks Patrick. I would push back a bit, though, in that I don't think of the web as an advertising platform. I see it as a communications platform. Advertising is one method that can happen here, but if we look at it as purely an advertising platform and miss the interpersonal connections and communications, we're not going to get the most out of it and the people we communicate with here will be turned off as we are just trying to sell them something. Yes, I mean this for companies as well as individuals. It's okay for a company to be here, communicating, and not have the intent to sell something. It makes them more real, relevant and in the long run, effective at doing what they ultimately want to to – sell. Ironic, hey?

      Thanks for the thoughts.

    • Patrick:

      The web only looks like an advertising platform if you are an advertiser.

      To me the internet looks like the world's greatest information source. I no longer need marketers because I can connect to my like minded peers around the world to help me decide which digital camera, car, and big screen tv to buy. I no longer have my news filtered by the NYT or WSJ editorial staff, I decide who and what to read.

      Marketers who get this can take advantage of it by becoming part of the solution (making the internet MORE useful to people) instead of part of the problem (cluttering it up with more ads).

      Tom O'Brien