Walking The Fine Line Of The Personal Brand - Social Media Explorer
Walking The Fine Line Of The Personal Brand
Walking The Fine Line Of The Personal Brand
by
Jason Falls
Jason Falls

The exploration of your personal brand is quite a captivating experience. It is, after all, all about you. Human beings, by nature, prioritize themselves over others. Whether from an inherited survival of the fittest conditioning imperative in our ancient ancestors or just a matter of world perspective, we do think about ourselves on some scale of priority.

But therein lies a danger we must recognize. While your personal brand may well serve a valuable purpose for you and your company, separating and recognizing the best interests of those two entities is important. Regardless of how successful or influential our personal brand is, we need to be certain to keep our egos in check.

Deloitte’s recent Ethics & Workplace Survey shows 53 percent of employees say their social networking pages are not an employer’s concern. But 60 percent of executives believe they have a right to know how employees portray themselves and their organization online. Shockingly, one-third of employees surveyed NEVER considered what their boss or customers might think before posting material on the Internet.

Let’s say you’re a product development researcher for a toy company. You blog, participate in forums online and build a well-respected brand as a toy developer. Everyone knows you work for ABC Toys, but your opinion is clearly marked as your own in your online life. But the head of product development at ABC Toys is nervous that your authority in the industry can taint what competitors, suppliers, vendors and customers think about ABC Toys. Your opinions about processes, products of other companies and more are not opinions ABC Toys is comfortable having broadcast to the world.

You just continue to blog along, participating in communities and talking about what interests you, but your growing online presence starts to look like an ego play to ABC Toys. They start to wonder if you’re spending work time doing what you do. They are concerned you may be using your position to jockey for a promotion, or worse, a job with another company.

The communities you participate in will be severely disappointed in ABC Toys if you stop participating or when they find out ABC Toys has censored you a bit. So what’s the company to do?

I hear you yelling about personal rights and personal time and all that jazz. But if you put your company on a LinkedIn profile, you are connected to that company online. Thus, your funny Facebook photos, while not directly connected to your company, are connect-able to it. Your employer does have the right to hold you accountable for your online life.

At some point, we also have to admit that personal brand growth is intoxicating. For some people, it feeds a hungry ego. When motivated by ego, we often run awry. While most of us can and do keep that ego in check and aren’t motivated for wholly selfish reasons, our managers don’t always know what’s inside our heads and can assume too much.

But we should recognize that if personal branding or reputation management is so important in getting a job, it should also be considered important in keeping one. As such, those with or building strong personal brands need to take a few simple steps to ensure your employer doesn’t issue that awful ultimatum of stop or be fired.

  1. Bring Personal Branding Into HR Conversations When applying for a job, ask what the company stance is on employees blogging, whether you can identify as being with the company on your personal websites or in communications on social networks and blogs. Define the goals of your personal brand with Human Resources or your hiring manager and discuss them. If you’re already in your job, go have those conversations now and establish some comfortable parameters.

    You may also want to establish some goals for your personal brand tied to company success, then negotiate personal rewards for achieving them. For instance, agree with your boss that for every new business lead or conversion generated by your audience’s outreach to you online, you get a bonus. Perhaps you can set a lofty goal with the reward being a raise or promotion.

  2. Decide How Much/Little You Want To Affiliate With Your Company

    Identifying yourself as a blogger who works at company X can certainly help build your personal brand as you borrow a bit of company equity to attract respect and readers. But your ideas are what will make you relevant to your audience in the long term. If you want to be strongly affiliated with your company, sell the benefits of an influential personal brand to your boss. Explain to them how your influence can be used to drive website traffic, solicit customer feedback and even be a social media outpost for a company that might be afraid to toe those waters.

    But make sure you’re prepared to give up a bit of control of what you can and cannot do or say. There’s no such thing as a gray area here. If you identify yourself with your company, the company has the right to protect their reputation and investment in you. And if you disagree, they’ll likely stop sending you a paycheck.

  3. Educate Your Boss & Co-Workers On Personal Branding

    Strong personal brands can quickly lead to interesting inter-office angst. Your fellow employees may be jealous you’ve gotten some cyber-blessing they don’t have (because they don’t know to ask) or frustrated you’re getting attention, promotions and the like by, “playing on the Internet.” Your boss and those co-workers may also start to develop some concerns you’re spending too much time working on your personal presence online and not doing what you were hired for.

    The only way to get around the office politics is to proactively teach people the benefits of a strong personal brand and show them how to do it. Do keep in mind, however, you need to show them the company’s benefits of a personal brand first. If you make it part of the department’s business objectives, they’re more apt to see the merit and no longer think you’re just goofing off online all the time.

  4. Do An Ego Check

    Every so often, you just need to step back and ask yourself, “Am I working for the company or am I working for me?” If you want to keep your job, you should continually take steps to ensure you are pushing forward the agreed upon company messages, goals or objectives. If you’ve drawn a distinction between the two (company and individual) with your boss, then ask how much time you’re spending on your personal brand during work hours. If it’s more than what your boss or company is comfortable with, cut back.

Certainly, in an ideal world, all our personal brands would be so successful we wouldn’t need to work for someone else. But reality is a much different picture. As strong as we agree the building of personal brands is a relevant and necessary endeavor, we shouldn’t lose sight of the fact that our employers have a right and should have a role in where, when and how we shape them.

A penny for your thoughts. The comments are yours.

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About the Author

Jason Falls
Jason Falls is the founder of Social Media Explorer and one of the most notable and outspoken voices in the social media marketing industry. He is a noted marketing keynote speaker, author of two books and unapologetic bourbon aficionado. He can also be found at JasonFalls.com.
  • Robert Johannesburg

    This was really interesting. You also make a lot of valid points. Even though everyone has a right to an opinion, in today’s world that opinion can affect more than just yourself. It is important to you, and to your company, that you represent them well. I like this idea, because I think it limits bad online manners. If people are held responsible to someone outside of themselves, I think it makes them more cautious. Oh, and one quick question: is the ABC toys you used in your example a real company? Christmas is coming up, after all, and I have lots of little nieces and nephews…

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  • AmberNaslund

    Gentlemen,

    Thanks to both of you for the kind words (and please pardon my delay getting over here to say so). I know this is going to shock and disgust some folks, but I don't really overanalyze this. Maybe I should. But I do what seems like common sense.

    My work with Radian6 and my personal brand (ugh) are symbiotic. We work to build one another, and if we do good work, both of us benefit as a result. I'm driven to help people and work hard, and hopefully that comes through in what I do. Maybe Jason's right – maybe I have the benefit of working for a stellar company and brand. But I'll say that so much of this to me seems like common sense, the same way you'd behave if you were doing any other public, customer-facing work on behalf of a company. We just now have that many other channels to keep track of, but they're not going away anytime soon.

    Thanks again, you guys. Kind words, and very much appreciated.

    Amber

  • AmberNaslund

    Gentlemen,

    Thanks to both of you for the kind words (and please pardon my delay getting over here to say so). I know this is going to shock and disgust some folks, but I don't really overanalyze this. Maybe I should. But I do what seems like common sense.

    My work with Radian6 and my personal brand (ugh) are symbiotic. We work to build one another, and if we do good work, both of us benefit as a result. I'm driven to help people and work hard, and hopefully that comes through in what I do. Maybe Jason's right – maybe I have the benefit of working for a stellar company and brand. But I'll say that so much of this to me seems like common sense, the same way you'd behave if you were doing any other public, customer-facing work on behalf of a company. We just now have that many other channels to keep track of, but they're not going away anytime soon.

    Thanks again, you guys. Kind words, and very much appreciated.

    Amber

  • Gentlemen,

    Thanks to both of you for the kind words (and please pardon my delay getting over here to say so). I know this is going to shock and disgust some folks, but I don't really overanalyze this. Maybe I should. But I do what seems like common sense.

    My work with Radian6 and my personal brand (ugh) are symbiotic. We work to build one another, and if we do good work, both of us benefit as a result. I'm driven to help people and work hard, and hopefully that comes through in what I do. Maybe Jason's right – maybe I have the benefit of working for a stellar company and brand. But I'll say that so much of this to me seems like common sense, the same way you'd behave if you were doing any other public, customer-facing work on behalf of a company. We just now have that many other channels to keep track of, but they're not going away anytime soon.

    Thanks again, you guys. Kind words, and very much appreciated.

    Amber

  • Gentlemen,

    Thanks to both of you for the kind words (and please pardon my delay getting over here to say so). I know this is going to shock and disgust some folks, but I don't really overanalyze this. Maybe I should. But I do what seems like common sense.

    My work with Radian6 and my personal brand (ugh) are symbiotic. We work to build one another, and if we do good work, both of us benefit as a result. I'm driven to help people and work hard, and hopefully that comes through in what I do. Maybe Jason's right – maybe I have the benefit of working for a stellar company and brand. But I'll say that so much of this to me seems like common sense, the same way you'd behave if you were doing any other public, customer-facing work on behalf of a company. We just now have that many other channels to keep track of, but they're not going away anytime soon.

    Thanks again, you guys. Kind words, and very much appreciated.

    Amber

  • Gentlemen,

    Thanks to both of you for the kind words (and please pardon my delay getting over here to say so). I know this is going to shock and disgust some folks, but I don't really overanalyze this. Maybe I should. But I do what seems like common sense.

    My work with Radian6 and my personal brand (ugh) are symbiotic. We work to build one another, and if we do good work, both of us benefit as a result. I'm driven to help people and work hard, and hopefully that comes through in what I do. Maybe Jason's right – maybe I have the benefit of working for a stellar company and brand. But I'll say that so much of this to me seems like common sense, the same way you'd behave if you were doing any other public, customer-facing work on behalf of a company. We just now have that many other channels to keep track of, but they're not going away anytime soon.

    Thanks again, you guys. Kind words, and very much appreciated.

    Amber

  • Gentlemen,

    Thanks to both of you for the kind words (and please pardon my delay getting over here to say so). I know this is going to shock and disgust some folks, but I don't really overanalyze this. Maybe I should. But I do what seems like common sense.

    My work with Radian6 and my personal brand (ugh) are symbiotic. We work to build one another, and if we do good work, both of us benefit as a result. I'm driven to help people and work hard, and hopefully that comes through in what I do. Maybe Jason's right – maybe I have the benefit of working for a stellar company and brand. But I'll say that so much of this to me seems like common sense, the same way you'd behave if you were doing any other public, customer-facing work on behalf of a company. We just now have that many other channels to keep track of, but they're not going away anytime soon.

    Thanks again, you guys. Kind words, and very much appreciated.

    Amber

  • Gentlemen,

    Thanks to both of you for the kind words (and please pardon my delay getting over here to say so). I know this is going to shock and disgust some folks, but I don't really overanalyze this. Maybe I should. But I do what seems like common sense.

    My work with Radian6 and my personal brand (ugh) are symbiotic. We work to build one another, and if we do good work, both of us benefit as a result. I'm driven to help people and work hard, and hopefully that comes through in what I do. Maybe Jason's right – maybe I have the benefit of working for a stellar company and brand. But I'll say that so much of this to me seems like common sense, the same way you'd behave if you were doing any other public, customer-facing work on behalf of a company. We just now have that many other channels to keep track of, but they're not going away anytime soon.

    Thanks again, you guys. Kind words, and very much appreciated.

    Amber

  • I'm really fascinated by this social media sub-plot. Organizations have always been made up of individuals that represent the organization as a whole. I love the new dimension that social technologies put on this dynamic.

    If I have a bad experience with Company XYZ Customer Care rep John Smith over the phone, I've had a bad experience with one person and yet the entire organization loses my business.

    Does Company XYZ still lose my business if/when Customer Care rep John Smith writes a controversial blog post or posts questionable pictures of himself on Facebook?

    If that kind of loss of business occurs, can it be quantified?

    But more importantly, is a world where we could hide behind the term “Off Duty” be slipping away into the darkness of yesteryear's unconnectedness? Where exactly will we as consumers redraw the line between personal and private as we all evolve on-line? Or will the line simply go away altogether?

    I personally think that we are all moving toward a single integrated self, as our lives are played out on-line. But I'm seriously enjoying watching it play out. :)

    -chris

  • I'm really fascinated by this social media sub-plot. Organizations have always been made up of individuals that represent the organization as a whole. I love the new dimension that social technologies put on this dynamic.

    If I have a bad experience with Company XYZ Customer Care rep John Smith over the phone, I've had a bad experience with one person and yet the entire organization loses my business.

    Does Company XYZ still lose my business if/when Customer Care rep John Smith writes a controversial blog post or posts questionable pictures of himself on Facebook?

    If that kind of loss of business occurs, can it be quantified?

    But more importantly, is a world where we could hide behind the term “Off Duty” be slipping away into the darkness of yesteryear's unconnectedness? Where exactly will we as consumers redraw the line between personal and private as we all evolve on-line? Or will the line simply go away altogether?

    I personally think that we are all moving toward a single integrated self, as our lives are played out on-line. But I'm seriously enjoying watching it play out. :)

    -chris

  • I'm really fascinated by this social media sub-plot. Organizations have always been made up of individuals that represent the organization as a whole. I love the new dimension that social technologies put on this dynamic.

    If I have a bad experience with Company XYZ Customer Care rep John Smith over the phone, I've had a bad experience with one person and yet the entire organization loses my business.

    Does Company XYZ still lose my business if/when Customer Care rep John Smith writes a controversial blog post or posts questionable pictures of himself on Facebook?

    If that kind of loss of business occurs, can it be quantified?

    But more importantly, is a world where we could hide behind the term “Off Duty” be slipping away into the darkness of yesteryear's unconnectedness? Where exactly will we as consumers redraw the line between personal and private as we all evolve on-line? Or will the line simply go away altogether?

    I personally think that we are all moving toward a single integrated self, as our lives are played out on-line. But I'm seriously enjoying watching it play out. :)

    -chris

  • I'm really fascinated by this social media sub-plot. Organizations have always been made up of individuals that represent the organization as a whole. I love the new dimension that social technologies put on this dynamic.

    If I have a bad experience with Company XYZ Customer Care rep John Smith over the phone, I've had a bad experience with one person and yet the entire organization loses my business.

    Does Company XYZ still lose my business if/when Customer Care rep John Smith writes a controversial blog post or posts questionable pictures of himself on Facebook?

    If that kind of loss of business occurs, can it be quantified?

    But more importantly, is a world where we could hide behind the term “Off Duty” be slipping away into the darkness of yesteryear's unconnectedness? Where exactly will we as consumers redraw the line between personal and private as we all evolve on-line? Or will the line simply go away altogether?

    I personally think that we are all moving toward a single integrated self, as our lives are played out on-line. But I'm seriously enjoying watching it play out. :)

    -chris

  • I'm really fascinated by this social media sub-plot. Organizations have always been made up of individuals that represent the organization as a whole. I love the new dimension that social technologies put on this dynamic.

    If I have a bad experience with Company XYZ Customer Care rep John Smith over the phone, I've had a bad experience with one person and yet the entire organization loses my business.

    Does Company XYZ still lose my business if/when Customer Care rep John Smith writes a controversial blog post or posts questionable pictures of himself on Facebook?

    If that kind of loss of business occurs, can it be quantified?

    But more importantly, is a world where we could hide behind the term “Off Duty” be slipping away into the darkness of yesteryear's unconnectedness? Where exactly will we as consumers redraw the line between personal and private as we all evolve on-line? Or will the line simply go away altogether?

    I personally think that we are all moving toward a single integrated self, as our lives are played out on-line. But I'm seriously enjoying watching it play out. :)

    -chris

  • I'm really fascinated by this social media sub-plot. Organizations have always been made up of individuals that represent the organization as a whole. I love the new dimension that social technologies put on this dynamic.

    If I have a bad experience with Company XYZ Customer Care rep John Smith over the phone, I've had a bad experience with one person and yet the entire organization loses my business.

    Does Company XYZ still lose my business if/when Customer Care rep John Smith writes a controversial blog post or posts questionable pictures of himself on Facebook?

    If that kind of loss of business occurs, can it be quantified?

    But more importantly, is a world where we could hide behind the term “Off Duty” be slipping away into the darkness of yesteryear's unconnectedness? Where exactly will we as consumers redraw the line between personal and private as we all evolve on-line? Or will the line simply go away altogether?

    I personally think that we are all moving toward a single integrated self, as our lives are played out on-line. But I'm seriously enjoying watching it play out. :)

    -chris

  • I'm really fascinated by this social media sub-plot. Organizations have always been made up of individuals that represent the organization as a whole. I love the new dimension that social technologies put on this dynamic.

    If I have a bad experience with Company XYZ Customer Care rep John Smith over the phone, I've had a bad experience with one person and yet the entire organization loses my business.

    Does Company XYZ still lose my business if/when Customer Care rep John Smith writes a controversial blog post or posts questionable pictures of himself on Facebook?

    If that kind of loss of business occurs, can it be quantified?

    But more importantly, is a world where we could hide behind the term “Off Duty” be slipping away into the darkness of yesteryear's unconnectedness? Where exactly will we as consumers redraw the line between personal and private as we all evolve on-line? Or will the line simply go away altogether?

    I personally think that we are all moving toward a single integrated self, as our lives are played out on-line. But I'm seriously enjoying watching it play out. :)

    -chris

  • I'm really fascinated by this social media sub-plot. Organizations have always been made up of individuals that represent the organization as a whole. I love the new dimension that social technologies put on this dynamic.

    If I have a bad experience with Company XYZ Customer Care rep John Smith over the phone, I've had a bad experience with one person and yet the entire organization loses my business.

    Does Company XYZ still lose my business if/when Customer Care rep John Smith writes a controversial blog post or posts questionable pictures of himself on Facebook?

    If that kind of loss of business occurs, can it be quantified?

    But more importantly, is a world where we could hide behind the term “Off Duty” be slipping away into the darkness of yesteryear's unconnectedness? Where exactly will we as consumers redraw the line between personal and private as we all evolve on-line? Or will the line simply go away altogether?

    I personally think that we are all moving toward a single integrated self, as our lives are played out on-line. But I'm seriously enjoying watching it play out. :)

    -chris

  • KatFrench

    Ah, Jason.

    Did I ever tell you about the time I almost got Dooced? Way before I was officially working in web marketing?

    I didn't write anything negative about my employer. In fact, I didn't write about my employer, at all. I mentioned in my blog that I was having a bad day in general and was struggling with feeling motivated at work.

    And I nearly got fired. Ostensibly “because people might know where you work.” But in actuality, it was most likely because a coworker was convinced I was spending all my work time “goofing off on the internet” and stalked my blog till she had sufficient ammo to go to H.R. and complain.

    As I recall, that same coworker spent roughly 40% of her day on personal calls or gossiping in the lunch room. Which apparently isn't “goofing off.” That's what folks in the mental health field call “transference.”

    I'm not taking this unpleasant stroll down vocational memory lane because I'm still bitter about that experience. (Although I kind of might be.) But because people just. don't. THINK. Part of this responsibility is incumbent on companies to have a policy in place before they just decide “Oh crap. An employee has a blog. What if people read it? What if she says something obnoxious!”

    But part of the responsibility is on the employees to track down their supervisors, HR folks, and make sure everybody knows where the other guy stands. The truth is, I don't think that employer was ever going to be okay with me blogging, and I wasn't ever going to be okay with not blogging. The smart and brave thing would have been to have gotten that out in the open from the start. I told my boss I had a blog, saw his face blanch, and didn't pursue it further. That was my bad.

    “Don't ask, don't tell” is NOT a workable strategy for employee social media participation.

  • KatFrench

    Ah, Jason.

    Did I ever tell you about the time I almost got Dooced? Way before I was officially working in web marketing?

    I didn't write anything negative about my employer. In fact, I didn't write about my employer, at all. I mentioned in my blog that I was having a bad day in general and was struggling with feeling motivated at work.

    And I nearly got fired. Ostensibly “because people might know where you work.” But in actuality, it was most likely because a coworker was convinced I was spending all my work time “goofing off on the internet” and stalked my blog till she had sufficient ammo to go to H.R. and complain.

    As I recall, that same coworker spent roughly 40% of her day on personal calls or gossiping in the lunch room. Which apparently isn't “goofing off.” That's what folks in the mental health field call “transference.”

    I'm not taking this unpleasant stroll down vocational memory lane because I'm still bitter about that experience. (Although I kind of might be.) But because people just. don't. THINK. Part of this responsibility is incumbent on companies to have a policy in place before they just decide “Oh crap. An employee has a blog. What if people read it? What if she says something obnoxious!”

    But part of the responsibility is on the employees to track down their supervisors, HR folks, and make sure everybody knows where the other guy stands. The truth is, I don't think that employer was ever going to be okay with me blogging, and I wasn't ever going to be okay with not blogging. The smart and brave thing would have been to have gotten that out in the open from the start. I told my boss I had a blog, saw his face blanch, and didn't pursue it further. That was my bad.

    “Don't ask, don't tell” is NOT a workable strategy for employee social media participation.

  • KatFrench

    Ah, Jason.

    Did I ever tell you about the time I almost got Dooced? Way before I was officially working in web marketing?

    I didn't write anything negative about my employer. In fact, I didn't write about my employer, at all. I mentioned in my blog that I was having a bad day in general and was struggling with feeling motivated at work.

    And I nearly got fired. Ostensibly “because people might know where you work.” But in actuality, it was most likely because a coworker was convinced I was spending all my work time “goofing off on the internet” and stalked my blog till she had sufficient ammo to go to H.R. and complain.

    As I recall, that same coworker spent roughly 40% of her day on personal calls or gossiping in the lunch room. Which apparently isn't “goofing off.” That's what folks in the mental health field call “transference.”

    I'm not taking this unpleasant stroll down vocational memory lane because I'm still bitter about that experience. (Although I kind of might be.) But because people just. don't. THINK. Part of this responsibility is incumbent on companies to have a policy in place before they just decide “Oh crap. An employee has a blog. What if people read it? What if she says something obnoxious!”

    But part of the responsibility is on the employees to track down their supervisors, HR folks, and make sure everybody knows where the other guy stands. The truth is, I don't think that employer was ever going to be okay with me blogging, and I wasn't ever going to be okay with not blogging. The smart and brave thing would have been to have gotten that out in the open from the start. I told my boss I had a blog, saw his face blanch, and didn't pursue it further. That was my bad.

    “Don't ask, don't tell” is NOT a workable strategy for employee social media participation.

  • KatFrench

    Ah, Jason.

    Did I ever tell you about the time I almost got Dooced? Way before I was officially working in web marketing?

    I didn't write anything negative about my employer. In fact, I didn't write about my employer, at all. I mentioned in my blog that I was having a bad day in general and was struggling with feeling motivated at work.

    And I nearly got fired. Ostensibly “because people might know where you work.” But in actuality, it was most likely because a coworker was convinced I was spending all my work time “goofing off on the internet” and stalked my blog till she had sufficient ammo to go to H.R. and complain.

    As I recall, that same coworker spent roughly 40% of her day on personal calls or gossiping in the lunch room. Which apparently isn't “goofing off.” That's what folks in the mental health field call “transference.”

    I'm not taking this unpleasant stroll down vocational memory lane because I'm still bitter about that experience. (Although I kind of might be.) But because people just. don't. THINK. Part of this responsibility is incumbent on companies to have a policy in place before they just decide “Oh crap. An employee has a blog. What if people read it? What if she says something obnoxious!”

    But part of the responsibility is on the employees to track down their supervisors, HR folks, and make sure everybody knows where the other guy stands. The truth is, I don't think that employer was ever going to be okay with me blogging, and I wasn't ever going to be okay with not blogging. The smart and brave thing would have been to have gotten that out in the open from the start. I told my boss I had a blog, saw his face blanch, and didn't pursue it further. That was my bad.

    “Don't ask, don't tell” is NOT a workable strategy for employee social media participation.

  • KatFrench

    Ah, Jason.

    Did I ever tell you about the time I almost got Dooced? Way before I was officially working in web marketing?

    I didn't write anything negative about my employer. In fact, I didn't write about my employer, at all. I mentioned in my blog that I was having a bad day in general and was struggling with feeling motivated at work.

    And I nearly got fired. Ostensibly “because people might know where you work.” But in actuality, it was most likely because a coworker was convinced I was spending all my work time “goofing off on the internet” and stalked my blog till she had sufficient ammo to go to H.R. and complain.

    As I recall, that same coworker spent roughly 40% of her day on personal calls or gossiping in the lunch room. Which apparently isn't “goofing off.” That's what folks in the mental health field call “transference.”

    I'm not taking this unpleasant stroll down vocational memory lane because I'm still bitter about that experience. (Although I kind of might be.) But because people just. don't. THINK. Part of this responsibility is incumbent on companies to have a policy in place before they just decide “Oh crap. An employee has a blog. What if people read it? What if she says something obnoxious!”

    But part of the responsibility is on the employees to track down their supervisors, HR folks, and make sure everybody knows where the other guy stands. The truth is, I don't think that employer was ever going to be okay with me blogging, and I wasn't ever going to be okay with not blogging. The smart and brave thing would have been to have gotten that out in the open from the start. I told my boss I had a blog, saw his face blanch, and didn't pursue it further. That was my bad.

    “Don't ask, don't tell” is NOT a workable strategy for employee social media participation.

  • KatFrench

    Ah, Jason.

    Did I ever tell you about the time I almost got Dooced? Way before I was officially working in web marketing?

    I didn't write anything negative about my employer. In fact, I didn't write about my employer, at all. I mentioned in my blog that I was having a bad day in general and was struggling with feeling motivated at work.

    And I nearly got fired. Ostensibly “because people might know where you work.” But in actuality, it was most likely because a coworker was convinced I was spending all my work time “goofing off on the internet” and stalked my blog till she had sufficient ammo to go to H.R. and complain.

    As I recall, that same coworker spent roughly 40% of her day on personal calls or gossiping in the lunch room. Which apparently isn't “goofing off.” That's what folks in the mental health field call “transference.”

    I'm not taking this unpleasant stroll down vocational memory lane because I'm still bitter about that experience. (Although I kind of might be.) But because people just. don't. THINK. Part of this responsibility is incumbent on companies to have a policy in place before they just decide “Oh crap. An employee has a blog. What if people read it? What if she says something obnoxious!”

    But part of the responsibility is on the employees to track down their supervisors, HR folks, and make sure everybody knows where the other guy stands. The truth is, I don't think that employer was ever going to be okay with me blogging, and I wasn't ever going to be okay with not blogging. The smart and brave thing would have been to have gotten that out in the open from the start. I told my boss I had a blog, saw his face blanch, and didn't pursue it further. That was my bad.

    “Don't ask, don't tell” is NOT a workable strategy for employee social media participation.

  • KatFrench

    Ah, Jason.

    Did I ever tell you about the time I almost got Dooced? Way before I was officially working in web marketing?

    I didn't write anything negative about my employer. In fact, I didn't write about my employer, at all. I mentioned in my blog that I was having a bad day in general and was struggling with feeling motivated at work.

    And I nearly got fired. Ostensibly “because people might know where you work.” But in actuality, it was most likely because a coworker was convinced I was spending all my work time “goofing off on the internet” and stalked my blog till she had sufficient ammo to go to H.R. and complain.

    As I recall, that same coworker spent roughly 40% of her day on personal calls or gossiping in the lunch room. Which apparently isn't “goofing off.” That's what folks in the mental health field call “transference.”

    I'm not taking this unpleasant stroll down vocational memory lane because I'm still bitter about that experience. (Although I kind of might be.) But because people just. don't. THINK. Part of this responsibility is incumbent on companies to have a policy in place before they just decide “Oh crap. An employee has a blog. What if people read it? What if she says something obnoxious!”

    But part of the responsibility is on the employees to track down their supervisors, HR folks, and make sure everybody knows where the other guy stands. The truth is, I don't think that employer was ever going to be okay with me blogging, and I wasn't ever going to be okay with not blogging. The smart and brave thing would have been to have gotten that out in the open from the start. I told my boss I had a blog, saw his face blanch, and didn't pursue it further. That was my bad.

    “Don't ask, don't tell” is NOT a workable strategy for employee social media participation.

  • KatFrench

    Ah, Jason.

    Did I ever tell you about the time I almost got Dooced? Way before I was officially working in web marketing?

    I didn't write anything negative about my employer. In fact, I didn't write about my employer, at all. I mentioned in my blog that I was having a bad day in general and was struggling with feeling motivated at work.

    And I nearly got fired. Ostensibly “because people might know where you work.” But in actuality, it was most likely because a coworker was convinced I was spending all my work time “goofing off on the internet” and stalked my blog till she had sufficient ammo to go to H.R. and complain.

    As I recall, that same coworker spent roughly 40% of her day on personal calls or gossiping in the lunch room. Which apparently isn't “goofing off.” That's what folks in the mental health field call “transference.”

    I'm not taking this unpleasant stroll down vocational memory lane because I'm still bitter about that experience. (Although I kind of might be.) But because people just. don't. THINK. Part of this responsibility is incumbent on companies to have a policy in place before they just decide “Oh crap. An employee has a blog. What if people read it? What if she says something obnoxious!”

    But part of the responsibility is on the employees to track down their supervisors, HR folks, and make sure everybody knows where the other guy stands. The truth is, I don't think that employer was ever going to be okay with me blogging, and I wasn't ever going to be okay with not blogging. The smart and brave thing would have been to have gotten that out in the open from the start. I told my boss I had a blog, saw his face blanch, and didn't pursue it further. That was my bad.

    “Don't ask, don't tell” is NOT a workable strategy for employee social media participation.

  • mrhames

    Does your agency have a social media policy? We're an ad agency trying to encourage the use of social media to understand it better. but we're crafting a policy so people know where the company stands. Almost like a dress code, but not.

    More like a don't be stupid code. And in an time where 30-something people can put food up their bum and allegedly pretend to serve it to customers, anything goes, right? Especially since they thought it would be funny to film it, and add it to YouTube.

  • mrhames

    Does your agency have a social media policy? We're an ad agency trying to encourage the use of social media to understand it better. but we're crafting a policy so people know where the company stands. Almost like a dress code, but not.

    More like a don't be stupid code. And in an time where 30-something people can put food up their bum and allegedly pretend to serve it to customers, anything goes, right? Especially since they thought it would be funny to film it, and add it to YouTube.

  • mrhames

    Does your agency have a social media policy? We're an ad agency trying to encourage the use of social media to understand it better. but we're crafting a policy so people know where the company stands. Almost like a dress code, but not.

    More like a don't be stupid code. And in an time where 30-something people can put food up their bum and allegedly pretend to serve it to customers, anything goes, right? Especially since they thought it would be funny to film it, and add it to YouTube.

  • mrhames

    Does your agency have a social media policy? We're an ad agency trying to encourage the use of social media to understand it better. but we're crafting a policy so people know where the company stands. Almost like a dress code, but not.

    More like a don't be stupid code. And in an time where 30-something people can put food up their bum and allegedly pretend to serve it to customers, anything goes, right? Especially since they thought it would be funny to film it, and add it to YouTube.

  • mrhames

    Does your agency have a social media policy? We're an ad agency trying to encourage the use of social media to understand it better. but we're crafting a policy so people know where the company stands. Almost like a dress code, but not.

    More like a don't be stupid code. And in an time where 30-something people can put food up their bum and allegedly pretend to serve it to customers, anything goes, right? Especially since they thought it would be funny to film it, and add it to YouTube.

  • mrhames

    Does your agency have a social media policy? We're an ad agency trying to encourage the use of social media to understand it better. but we're crafting a policy so people know where the company stands. Almost like a dress code, but not.

    More like a don't be stupid code. And in an time where 30-something people can put food up their bum and allegedly pretend to serve it to customers, anything goes, right? Especially since they thought it would be funny to film it, and add it to YouTube.

  • mrhames

    Does your agency have a social media policy? We're an ad agency trying to encourage the use of social media to understand it better. but we're crafting a policy so people know where the company stands. Almost like a dress code, but not.

    More like a don't be stupid code. And in an time where 30-something people can put food up their bum and allegedly pretend to serve it to customers, anything goes, right? Especially since they thought it would be funny to film it, and add it to YouTube.

  • mrhames

    Does your agency have a social media policy? We're an ad agency trying to encourage the use of social media to understand it better. but we're crafting a policy so people know where the company stands. Almost like a dress code, but not.

    More like a don't be stupid code. And in an time where 30-something people can put food up their bum and allegedly pretend to serve it to customers, anything goes, right? Especially since they thought it would be funny to film it, and add it to YouTube.

  • awesome post! Just got done reading Dan Schawbel's Me 2.0 book and then was browsing the AdAge top 150 Marketing/Ad/Social Media blogs and came across this post. I really like the content you have to offer. I like how you raise awareness of not only the benefits of having a personal brand, but also the cautions of doing it and what negatives can happen. I used to work at a Wall Street firm and social media/blogging/etc. would not even be thought of! I got out of that gig and now doing marketing and love the ability to express myself on the internet relating to topics of interest, passion, and expertise. Keep up the great work on your blog.

  • awesome post! Just got done reading Dan Schawbel's Me 2.0 book and then was browsing the AdAge top 150 Marketing/Ad/Social Media blogs and came across this post. I really like the content you have to offer. I like how you raise awareness of not only the benefits of having a personal brand, but also the cautions of doing it and what negatives can happen. I used to work at a Wall Street firm and social media/blogging/etc. would not even be thought of! I got out of that gig and now doing marketing and love the ability to express myself on the internet relating to topics of interest, passion, and expertise. Keep up the great work on your blog.

  • awesome post! Just got done reading Dan Schawbel's Me 2.0 book and then was browsing the AdAge top 150 Marketing/Ad/Social Media blogs and came across this post. I really like the content you have to offer. I like how you raise awareness of not only the benefits of having a personal brand, but also the cautions of doing it and what negatives can happen. I used to work at a Wall Street firm and social media/blogging/etc. would not even be thought of! I got out of that gig and now doing marketing and love the ability to express myself on the internet relating to topics of interest, passion, and expertise. Keep up the great work on your blog.

  • awesome post! Just got done reading Dan Schawbel's Me 2.0 book and then was browsing the AdAge top 150 Marketing/Ad/Social Media blogs and came across this post. I really like the content you have to offer. I like how you raise awareness of not only the benefits of having a personal brand, but also the cautions of doing it and what negatives can happen. I used to work at a Wall Street firm and social media/blogging/etc. would not even be thought of! I got out of that gig and now doing marketing and love the ability to express myself on the internet relating to topics of interest, passion, and expertise. Keep up the great work on your blog.

  • awesome post! Just got done reading Dan Schawbel's Me 2.0 book and then was browsing the AdAge top 150 Marketing/Ad/Social Media blogs and came across this post. I really like the content you have to offer. I like how you raise awareness of not only the benefits of having a personal brand, but also the cautions of doing it and what negatives can happen. I used to work at a Wall Street firm and social media/blogging/etc. would not even be thought of! I got out of that gig and now doing marketing and love the ability to express myself on the internet relating to topics of interest, passion, and expertise. Keep up the great work on your blog.

  • awesome post! Just got done reading Dan Schawbel's Me 2.0 book and then was browsing the AdAge top 150 Marketing/Ad/Social Media blogs and came across this post. I really like the content you have to offer. I like how you raise awareness of not only the benefits of having a personal brand, but also the cautions of doing it and what negatives can happen. I used to work at a Wall Street firm and social media/blogging/etc. would not even be thought of! I got out of that gig and now doing marketing and love the ability to express myself on the internet relating to topics of interest, passion, and expertise. Keep up the great work on your blog.

  • awesome post! Just got done reading Dan Schawbel's Me 2.0 book and then was browsing the AdAge top 150 Marketing/Ad/Social Media blogs and came across this post. I really like the content you have to offer. I like how you raise awareness of not only the benefits of having a personal brand, but also the cautions of doing it and what negatives can happen. I used to work at a Wall Street firm and social media/blogging/etc. would not even be thought of! I got out of that gig and now doing marketing and love the ability to express myself on the internet relating to topics of interest, passion, and expertise. Keep up the great work on your blog.

  • brentgrab

    awesome post! Just got done reading Dan Schawbel's Me 2.0 book and then was browsing the AdAge top 150 Marketing/Ad/Social Media blogs and came across this post. I really like the content you have to offer. I like how you raise awareness of not only the benefits of having a personal brand, but also the cautions of doing it and what negatives can happen. I used to work at a Wall Street firm and social media/blogging/etc. would not even be thought of! I got out of that gig and now doing marketing and love the ability to express myself on the internet relating to topics of interest, passion, and expertise. Keep up the great work on your blog.

  • Great post, Jason! This is great information and especially important for anyone establishing a strong personal brand directly linked to their current position. If you are in a position at work different from the personal brand you are working to establish online via social media, then you may not encounter many, if any, challenges.

  • Great post, Jason! This is great information and especially important for anyone establishing a strong personal brand directly linked to their current position. If you are in a position at work different from the personal brand you are working to establish online via social media, then you may not encounter many, if any, challenges.

  • Great post, Jason! This is great information and especially important for anyone establishing a strong personal brand directly linked to their current position. If you are in a position at work different from the personal brand you are working to establish online via social media, then you may not encounter many, if any, challenges.

  • Great post, Jason! This is great information and especially important for anyone establishing a strong personal brand directly linked to their current position. If you are in a position at work different from the personal brand you are working to establish online via social media, then you may not encounter many, if any, challenges.

  • Great post, Jason! This is great information and especially important for anyone establishing a strong personal brand directly linked to their current position. If you are in a position at work different from the personal brand you are working to establish online via social media, then you may not encounter many, if any, challenges.

  • Great post, Jason! This is great information and especially important for anyone establishing a strong personal brand directly linked to their current position. If you are in a position at work different from the personal brand you are working to establish online via social media, then you may not encounter many, if any, challenges.

  • Great post, Jason! This is great information and especially important for anyone establishing a strong personal brand directly linked to their current position. If you are in a position at work different from the personal brand you are working to establish online via social media, then you may not encounter many, if any, challenges.

  • Great post, Jason! This is great information and especially important for anyone establishing a strong personal brand directly linked to their current position. If you are in a position at work different from the personal brand you are working to establish online via social media, then you may not encounter many, if any, challenges.

  • That it is. Thanks for chiming in, Stuart.

  • That it is. Thanks for chiming in, Stuart.

  • That it is. Thanks for chiming in, Stuart.

  • That it is. Thanks for chiming in, Stuart.

  • That it is. Thanks for chiming in, Stuart.

  • That it is. Thanks for chiming in, Stuart.

  • That it is. Thanks for chiming in, Stuart.

  • Thanks, D.J. It's easy to put yourself on the line when you have a company/product/brand that is as good as Amber's. Of course, Amber is an all-star with or without Radian6. Thanks for pointing her out.

  • Thanks, D.J. It's easy to put yourself on the line when you have a company/product/brand that is as good as Amber's. Of course, Amber is an all-star with or without Radian6. Thanks for pointing her out.

  • Thanks, D.J. It's easy to put yourself on the line when you have a company/product/brand that is as good as Amber's. Of course, Amber is an all-star with or without Radian6. Thanks for pointing her out.

  • Thanks, D.J. It's easy to put yourself on the line when you have a company/product/brand that is as good as Amber's. Of course, Amber is an all-star with or without Radian6. Thanks for pointing her out.

  • Thanks, D.J. It's easy to put yourself on the line when you have a company/product/brand that is as good as Amber's. Of course, Amber is an all-star with or without Radian6. Thanks for pointing her out.

  • Thanks, D.J. It's easy to put yourself on the line when you have a company/product/brand that is as good as Amber's. Of course, Amber is an all-star with or without Radian6. Thanks for pointing her out.

  • Thanks, D.J. It's easy to put yourself on the line when you have a company/product/brand that is as good as Amber's. Of course, Amber is an all-star with or without Radian6. Thanks for pointing her out.

  • Because executives are reactive, not proactive. They're scared of doing something wrong instead of trying something that might be right.

    Of course, that's just my take. Heh.

  • Because executives are reactive, not proactive. They're scared of doing something wrong instead of trying something that might be right.

    Of course, that's just my take. Heh.

  • Because executives are reactive, not proactive. They're scared of doing something wrong instead of trying something that might be right.

    Of course, that's just my take. Heh.

  • Because executives are reactive, not proactive. They're scared of doing something wrong instead of trying something that might be right.

    Of course, that's just my take. Heh.

  • Because executives are reactive, not proactive. They're scared of doing something wrong instead of trying something that might be right.

    Of course, that's just my take. Heh.

  • Because executives are reactive, not proactive. They're scared of doing something wrong instead of trying something that might be right.

    Of course, that's just my take. Heh.

  • Because executives are reactive, not proactive. They're scared of doing something wrong instead of trying something that might be right.

    Of course, that's just my take. Heh.

  • Thanks Dan. Nice to know the personal branding expert approves. Much appreciated.

  • Thanks Dan. Nice to know the personal branding expert approves. Much appreciated.

  • Thanks Dan. Nice to know the personal branding expert approves. Much appreciated.

  • Thanks Dan. Nice to know the personal branding expert approves. Much appreciated.

  • Thanks Dan. Nice to know the personal branding expert approves. Much appreciated.

  • Thanks Dan. Nice to know the personal branding expert approves. Much appreciated.

  • Thanks Dan. Nice to know the personal branding expert approves. Much appreciated.

  • Interesting take. I've never had to deal with this to much mainly because in the jobs that I have had I was either exclusively responsible for the social media content/branding or the company was so far behind that they probably didn't know what Facebook was (go Temp Jobs!).

    Worth keeping an eye on for sure.

  • Interesting take. I've never had to deal with this to much mainly because in the jobs that I have had I was either exclusively responsible for the social media content/branding or the company was so far behind that they probably didn't know what Facebook was (go Temp Jobs!).

    Worth keeping an eye on for sure.

  • Interesting take. I've never had to deal with this to much mainly because in the jobs that I have had I was either exclusively responsible for the social media content/branding or the company was so far behind that they probably didn't know what Facebook was (go Temp Jobs!).

    Worth keeping an eye on for sure.

  • Interesting take. I've never had to deal with this to much mainly because in the jobs that I have had I was either exclusively responsible for the social media content/branding or the company was so far behind that they probably didn't know what Facebook was (go Temp Jobs!).

    Worth keeping an eye on for sure.

  • Interesting take. I've never had to deal with this to much mainly because in the jobs that I have had I was either exclusively responsible for the social media content/branding or the company was so far behind that they probably didn't know what Facebook was (go Temp Jobs!).

    Worth keeping an eye on for sure.

  • Interesting take. I've never had to deal with this to much mainly because in the jobs that I have had I was either exclusively responsible for the social media content/branding or the company was so far behind that they probably didn't know what Facebook was (go Temp Jobs!).

    Worth keeping an eye on for sure.

  • Interesting take. I've never had to deal with this to much mainly because in the jobs that I have had I was either exclusively responsible for the social media content/branding or the company was so far behind that they probably didn't know what Facebook was (go Temp Jobs!).

    Worth keeping an eye on for sure.

  • Interesting take. I've never had to deal with this to much mainly because in the jobs that I have had I was either exclusively responsible for the social media content/branding or the company was so far behind that they probably didn't know what Facebook was (go Temp Jobs!).

    Worth keeping an eye on for sure.

    • That it is. Thanks for chiming in, Stuart.

  • Pingback: Walking The Fine Line Of The Personal Brand | Social Media Explorer |()

  • Jason –

    The balance between personal and corporate brand is a fascinating one for me. I believe it works well for those individuals who work for a supportive company, don't do too many “dumb” things, and have a personality that allows for 100% transparency. Those that do a great job of merging personal and professional aren't afraid to put themselves on the line *and* believe in their company/product/brand.

    This won't come as a surprise to you, but IMHO Amber Naslund is one of the best at this.

    Thanks for a thought-provoking post.

    DJ Waldow
    @djwaldow (80% personal, 20% professional)
    @bronto (90% professional, 10% personal)

  • Jason –

    The balance between personal and corporate brand is a fascinating one for me. I believe it works well for those individuals who work for a supportive company, don't do too many “dumb” things, and have a personality that allows for 100% transparency. Those that do a great job of merging personal and professional aren't afraid to put themselves on the line *and* believe in their company/product/brand.

    This won't come as a surprise to you, but IMHO Amber Naslund is one of the best at this.

    Thanks for a thought-provoking post.

    DJ Waldow
    @djwaldow (80% personal, 20% professional)
    @bronto (90% professional, 10% personal)

  • Jason –

    The balance between personal and corporate brand is a fascinating one for me. I believe it works well for those individuals who work for a supportive company, don't do too many “dumb” things, and have a personality that allows for 100% transparency. Those that do a great job of merging personal and professional aren't afraid to put themselves on the line *and* believe in their company/product/brand.

    This won't come as a surprise to you, but IMHO Amber Naslund is one of the best at this.

    Thanks for a thought-provoking post.

    DJ Waldow
    @djwaldow (80% personal, 20% professional)
    @bronto (90% professional, 10% personal)

  • Jason –

    The balance between personal and corporate brand is a fascinating one for me. I believe it works well for those individuals who work for a supportive company, don't do too many “dumb” things, and have a personality that allows for 100% transparency. Those that do a great job of merging personal and professional aren't afraid to put themselves on the line *and* believe in their company/product/brand.

    This won't come as a surprise to you, but IMHO Amber Naslund is one of the best at this.

    Thanks for a thought-provoking post.

    DJ Waldow
    @djwaldow (80% personal, 20% professional)
    @bronto (90% professional, 10% personal)

  • Jason –

    The balance between personal and corporate brand is a fascinating one for me. I believe it works well for those individuals who work for a supportive company, don't do too many “dumb” things, and have a personality that allows for 100% transparency. Those that do a great job of merging personal and professional aren't afraid to put themselves on the line *and* believe in their company/product/brand.

    This won't come as a surprise to you, but IMHO Amber Naslund is one of the best at this.

    Thanks for a thought-provoking post.

    DJ Waldow
    @djwaldow (80% personal, 20% professional)
    @bronto (90% professional, 10% personal)

  • Jason –

    The balance between personal and corporate brand is a fascinating one for me. I believe it works well for those individuals who work for a supportive company, don't do too many “dumb” things, and have a personality that allows for 100% transparency. Those that do a great job of merging personal and professional aren't afraid to put themselves on the line *and* believe in their company/product/brand.

    This won't come as a surprise to you, but IMHO Amber Naslund is one of the best at this.

    Thanks for a thought-provoking post.

    DJ Waldow
    @djwaldow (80% personal, 20% professional)
    @bronto (90% professional, 10% personal)

  • Jason –

    The balance between personal and corporate brand is a fascinating one for me. I believe it works well for those individuals who work for a supportive company, don't do too many “dumb” things, and have a personality that allows for 100% transparency. Those that do a great job of merging personal and professional aren't afraid to put themselves on the line *and* believe in their company/product/brand.

    This won't come as a surprise to you, but IMHO Amber Naslund is one of the best at this.

    Thanks for a thought-provoking post.

    DJ Waldow
    @djwaldow (80% personal, 20% professional)
    @bronto (90% professional, 10% personal)

  • Jason –

    The balance between personal and corporate brand is a fascinating one for me. I believe it works well for those individuals who work for a supportive company, don't do too many “dumb” things, and have a personality that allows for 100% transparency. Those that do a great job of merging personal and professional aren't afraid to put themselves on the line *and* believe in their company/product/brand.

    This won't come as a surprise to you, but IMHO Amber Naslund is one of the best at this.

    Thanks for a thought-provoking post.

    DJ Waldow
    @djwaldow (80% personal, 20% professional)
    @bronto (90% professional, 10% personal)

    • Thanks, D.J. It's easy to put yourself on the line when you have a company/product/brand that is as good as Amber's. Of course, Amber is an all-star with or without Radian6. Thanks for pointing her out.

      • Gentlemen,

        Thanks to both of you for the kind words (and please pardon my delay getting over here to say so). I know this is going to shock and disgust some folks, but I don't really overanalyze this. Maybe I should. But I do what seems like common sense.

        My work with Radian6 and my personal brand (ugh) are symbiotic. We work to build one another, and if we do good work, both of us benefit as a result. I'm driven to help people and work hard, and hopefully that comes through in what I do. Maybe Jason's right – maybe I have the benefit of working for a stellar company and brand. But I'll say that so much of this to me seems like common sense, the same way you'd behave if you were doing any other public, customer-facing work on behalf of a company. We just now have that many other channels to keep track of, but they're not going away anytime soon.

        Thanks again, you guys. Kind words, and very much appreciated.

        Amber

  • I think it's ironic that 60% of executives want to know what employees say on their personal profiles, and yet so many still balk at building a social media listening plan or listening to/engaging with customers online.

    Why one and not the other?

  • I think it's ironic that 60% of executives want to know what employees say on their personal profiles, and yet so many still balk at building a social media listening plan or listening to/engaging with customers online.

    Why one and not the other?

  • I think it's ironic that 60% of executives want to know what employees say on their personal profiles, and yet so many still balk at building a social media listening plan or listening to/engaging with customers online.

    Why one and not the other?

  • I think it's ironic that 60% of executives want to know what employees say on their personal profiles, and yet so many still balk at building a social media listening plan or listening to/engaging with customers online.

    Why one and not the other?

  • I think it's ironic that 60% of executives want to know what employees say on their personal profiles, and yet so many still balk at building a social media listening plan or listening to/engaging with customers online.

    Why one and not the other?

  • I think it's ironic that 60% of executives want to know what employees say on their personal profiles, and yet so many still balk at building a social media listening plan or listening to/engaging with customers online.

    Why one and not the other?

  • I think it's ironic that 60% of executives want to know what employees say on their personal profiles, and yet so many still balk at building a social media listening plan or listening to/engaging with customers online.

    Why one and not the other?

  • I think it's ironic that 60% of executives want to know what employees say on their personal profiles, and yet so many still balk at building a social media listening plan or listening to/engaging with customers online.

    Why one and not the other?

    • Because executives are reactive, not proactive. They're scared of doing something wrong instead of trying something that might be right.

      Of course, that's just my take. Heh.

  • Jason, great blog post. The first point you mentioned is only going to become a more important consideration, especially for Gen-Y'ers. If a company isn't in this space right now, they are in serious trouble in the future. In fact, I don't know how some companies can afford to spend money using traditional means right now, so they probably won't survive the recession anyways. HR is going to be forced to be “cool” with these social networking activities (and legal). The problem is that the workplace is still slow to change.

  • Jason, great blog post. The first point you mentioned is only going to become a more important consideration, especially for Gen-Y'ers. If a company isn't in this space right now, they are in serious trouble in the future. In fact, I don't know how some companies can afford to spend money using traditional means right now, so they probably won't survive the recession anyways. HR is going to be forced to be “cool” with these social networking activities (and legal). The problem is that the workplace is still slow to change.

  • Jason, great blog post. The first point you mentioned is only going to become a more important consideration, especially for Gen-Y'ers. If a company isn't in this space right now, they are in serious trouble in the future. In fact, I don't know how some companies can afford to spend money using traditional means right now, so they probably won't survive the recession anyways. HR is going to be forced to be “cool” with these social networking activities (and legal). The problem is that the workplace is still slow to change.

  • Jason, great blog post. The first point you mentioned is only going to become a more important consideration, especially for Gen-Y'ers. If a company isn't in this space right now, they are in serious trouble in the future. In fact, I don't know how some companies can afford to spend money using traditional means right now, so they probably won't survive the recession anyways. HR is going to be forced to be “cool” with these social networking activities (and legal). The problem is that the workplace is still slow to change.

  • Jason, great blog post. The first point you mentioned is only going to become a more important consideration, especially for Gen-Y'ers. If a company isn't in this space right now, they are in serious trouble in the future. In fact, I don't know how some companies can afford to spend money using traditional means right now, so they probably won't survive the recession anyways. HR is going to be forced to be “cool” with these social networking activities (and legal). The problem is that the workplace is still slow to change.

  • Jason, great blog post. The first point you mentioned is only going to become a more important consideration, especially for Gen-Y'ers. If a company isn't in this space right now, they are in serious trouble in the future. In fact, I don't know how some companies can afford to spend money using traditional means right now, so they probably won't survive the recession anyways. HR is going to be forced to be “cool” with these social networking activities (and legal). The problem is that the workplace is still slow to change.

  • Jason, great blog post. The first point you mentioned is only going to become a more important consideration, especially for Gen-Y'ers. If a company isn't in this space right now, they are in serious trouble in the future. In fact, I don't know how some companies can afford to spend money using traditional means right now, so they probably won't survive the recession anyways. HR is going to be forced to be “cool” with these social networking activities (and legal). The problem is that the workplace is still slow to change.

  • Jason, great blog post. The first point you mentioned is only going to become a more important consideration, especially for Gen-Y'ers. If a company isn't in this space right now, they are in serious trouble in the future. In fact, I don't know how some companies can afford to spend money using traditional means right now, so they probably won't survive the recession anyways. HR is going to be forced to be “cool” with these social networking activities (and legal). The problem is that the workplace is still slow to change.

    • Thanks Dan. Nice to know the personal branding expert approves. Much appreciated.

  • John, you said it as good as could be said. “It is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management.”

    If that were happening in all organizations over the last 5-10 years, there wouldn't be any personal branding controversies. Well said. Companies take note. “Proactive management” — brilliant.

  • John, you said it as good as could be said. “It is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management.”

    If that were happening in all organizations over the last 5-10 years, there wouldn't be any personal branding controversies. Well said. Companies take note. “Proactive management” — brilliant.

  • John, you said it as good as could be said. “It is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management.”

    If that were happening in all organizations over the last 5-10 years, there wouldn't be any personal branding controversies. Well said. Companies take note. “Proactive management” — brilliant.

  • John, you said it as good as could be said. “It is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management.”

    If that were happening in all organizations over the last 5-10 years, there wouldn't be any personal branding controversies. Well said. Companies take note. “Proactive management” — brilliant.

  • John, you said it as good as could be said. “It is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management.”

    If that were happening in all organizations over the last 5-10 years, there wouldn't be any personal branding controversies. Well said. Companies take note. “Proactive management” — brilliant.

  • John, you said it as good as could be said. “It is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management.”

    If that were happening in all organizations over the last 5-10 years, there wouldn't be any personal branding controversies. Well said. Companies take note. “Proactive management” — brilliant.

  • John, you said it as good as could be said. “It is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management.”

    If that were happening in all organizations over the last 5-10 years, there wouldn't be any personal branding controversies. Well said. Companies take note. “Proactive management” — brilliant.

  • Very true, Adam. Thanks for the thoughts.

    My hope is this will help folks navigate those choppy waters when the boss starts getting nervous about how “Googled” his or her employees are.

  • Very true, Adam. Thanks for the thoughts.

    My hope is this will help folks navigate those choppy waters when the boss starts getting nervous about how “Googled” his or her employees are.

  • Very true, Adam. Thanks for the thoughts.

    My hope is this will help folks navigate those choppy waters when the boss starts getting nervous about how “Googled” his or her employees are.

  • Very true, Adam. Thanks for the thoughts.

    My hope is this will help folks navigate those choppy waters when the boss starts getting nervous about how “Googled” his or her employees are.

  • Very true, Adam. Thanks for the thoughts.

    My hope is this will help folks navigate those choppy waters when the boss starts getting nervous about how “Googled” his or her employees are.

  • Very true, Adam. Thanks for the thoughts.

    My hope is this will help folks navigate those choppy waters when the boss starts getting nervous about how “Googled” his or her employees are.

  • Very true, Adam. Thanks for the thoughts.

    My hope is this will help folks navigate those choppy waters when the boss starts getting nervous about how “Googled” his or her employees are.

  • A very well argued blog. I have had a number of conversations with clients recently about who should be the 'social media voice' for a business, and the consensus is definitely that it is something everyone should be involved with (or allowed/encouraged to be involved with). You have neatly summed up the risk that an organisation faces though by referring to personal branding. To my mind, it will always be a thin line that people walk, but it's far better that they start walking than stay where they are. At the risk of over-extending the metaphor, it is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management. And without wanting to use your blog as a platform for self-promotion, I have given the subject a slightly different spin on my blog here (http://www.baseonegroup.co.uk/beyond/2009/05/le…). Did I say my blog? I meant my company's blog. Ooops.

  • A very well argued blog. I have had a number of conversations with clients recently about who should be the 'social media voice' for a business, and the consensus is definitely that it is something everyone should be involved with (or allowed/encouraged to be involved with). You have neatly summed up the risk that an organisation faces though by referring to personal branding. To my mind, it will always be a thin line that people walk, but it's far better that they start walking than stay where they are. At the risk of over-extending the metaphor, it is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management. And without wanting to use your blog as a platform for self-promotion, I have given the subject a slightly different spin on my blog here (http://www.baseonegroup.co.uk/beyond/2009/05/le…). Did I say my blog? I meant my company's blog. Ooops.

  • A very well argued blog. I have had a number of conversations with clients recently about who should be the 'social media voice' for a business, and the consensus is definitely that it is something everyone should be involved with (or allowed/encouraged to be involved with). You have neatly summed up the risk that an organisation faces though by referring to personal branding. To my mind, it will always be a thin line that people walk, but it's far better that they start walking than stay where they are. At the risk of over-extending the metaphor, it is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management. And without wanting to use your blog as a platform for self-promotion, I have given the subject a slightly different spin on my blog here (http://www.baseonegroup.co.uk/beyond/2009/05/le…). Did I say my blog? I meant my company's blog. Ooops.

  • A very well argued blog. I have had a number of conversations with clients recently about who should be the 'social media voice' for a business, and the consensus is definitely that it is something everyone should be involved with (or allowed/encouraged to be involved with). You have neatly summed up the risk that an organisation faces though by referring to personal branding. To my mind, it will always be a thin line that people walk, but it's far better that they start walking than stay where they are. At the risk of over-extending the metaphor, it is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management. And without wanting to use your blog as a platform for self-promotion, I have given the subject a slightly different spin on my blog here (http://www.baseonegroup.co.uk/beyond/2009/05/le…). Did I say my blog? I meant my company's blog. Ooops.

  • A very well argued blog. I have had a number of conversations with clients recently about who should be the 'social media voice' for a business, and the consensus is definitely that it is something everyone should be involved with (or allowed/encouraged to be involved with). You have neatly summed up the risk that an organisation faces though by referring to personal branding. To my mind, it will always be a thin line that people walk, but it's far better that they start walking than stay where they are. At the risk of over-extending the metaphor, it is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management. And without wanting to use your blog as a platform for self-promotion, I have given the subject a slightly different spin on my blog here (http://www.baseonegroup.co.uk/beyond/2009/05/le…). Did I say my blog? I meant my company's blog. Ooops.

  • A very well argued blog. I have had a number of conversations with clients recently about who should be the 'social media voice' for a business, and the consensus is definitely that it is something everyone should be involved with (or allowed/encouraged to be involved with). You have neatly summed up the risk that an organisation faces though by referring to personal branding. To my mind, it will always be a thin line that people walk, but it's far better that they start walking than stay where they are. At the risk of over-extending the metaphor, it is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management. And without wanting to use your blog as a platform for self-promotion, I have given the subject a slightly different spin on my blog here (http://www.baseonegroup.co.uk/beyond/2009/05/le…). Did I say my blog? I meant my company's blog. Ooops.

  • A very well argued blog. I have had a number of conversations with clients recently about who should be the 'social media voice' for a business, and the consensus is definitely that it is something everyone should be involved with (or allowed/encouraged to be involved with). You have neatly summed up the risk that an organisation faces though by referring to personal branding. To my mind, it will always be a thin line that people walk, but it's far better that they start walking than stay where they are. At the risk of over-extending the metaphor, it is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management. And without wanting to use your blog as a platform for self-promotion, I have given the subject a slightly different spin on my blog here (http://www.baseonegroup.co.uk/beyond/2009/05/le…). Did I say my blog? I meant my company's blog. Ooops.

  • A very well argued blog. I have had a number of conversations with clients recently about who should be the 'social media voice' for a business, and the consensus is definitely that it is something everyone should be involved with (or allowed/encouraged to be involved with). You have neatly summed up the risk that an organisation faces though by referring to personal branding. To my mind, it will always be a thin line that people walk, but it's far better that they start walking than stay where they are. At the risk of over-extending the metaphor, it is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management. And without wanting to use your blog as a platform for self-promotion, I have given the subject a slightly different spin on my blog here (http://www.baseonegroup.co.uk/beyond/2009/05/le…). Did I say my blog? I meant my company's blog. Ooops.

    • John, you said it as good as could be said. “It is the duty of every progressive organisation to help employees keep their balance with clear guidelines and proactive management.”

      If that were happening in all organizations over the last 5-10 years, there wouldn't be any personal branding controversies. Well said. Companies take note. “Proactive management” — brilliant.

  • Great stuff. Years ago when we traveled the web with a fairly broad sense of anonymity people did not have a problem feeling like they could keep their online personas to themselves.

    This has changed quite a bit over the last couple years. In most cases people are using their real names in more communities and on publishing platforms. Google does a nice job of indexing all that information as well. You never know what might pop up. People simply need to get used to that and act accordingly. The choice is theirs.

  • Great stuff. Years ago when we traveled the web with a fairly broad sense of anonymity people did not have a problem feeling like they could keep their online personas to themselves.

    This has changed quite a bit over the last couple years. In most cases people are using their real names in more communities and on publishing platforms. Google does a nice job of indexing all that information as well. You never know what might pop up. People simply need to get used to that and act accordingly. The choice is theirs.

  • Great stuff. Years ago when we traveled the web with a fairly broad sense of anonymity people did not have a problem feeling like they could keep their online personas to themselves.

    This has changed quite a bit over the last couple years. In most cases people are using their real names in more communities and on publishing platforms. Google does a nice job of indexing all that information as well. You never know what might pop up. People simply need to get used to that and act accordingly. The choice is theirs.

  • Great stuff. Years ago when we traveled the web with a fairly broad sense of anonymity people did not have a problem feeling like they could keep their online personas to themselves.

    This has changed quite a bit over the last couple years. In most cases people are using their real names in more communities and on publishing platforms. Google does a nice job of indexing all that information as well. You never know what might pop up. People simply need to get used to that and act accordingly. The choice is theirs.

  • Great stuff. Years ago when we traveled the web with a fairly broad sense of anonymity people did not have a problem feeling like they could keep their online personas to themselves.

    This has changed quite a bit over the last couple years. In most cases people are using their real names in more communities and on publishing platforms. Google does a nice job of indexing all that information as well. You never know what might pop up. People simply need to get used to that and act accordingly. The choice is theirs.

  • Great stuff. Years ago when we traveled the web with a fairly broad sense of anonymity people did not have a problem feeling like they could keep their online personas to themselves.

    This has changed quite a bit over the last couple years. In most cases people are using their real names in more communities and on publishing platforms. Google does a nice job of indexing all that information as well. You never know what might pop up. People simply need to get used to that and act accordingly. The choice is theirs.

  • Great stuff. Years ago when we traveled the web with a fairly broad sense of anonymity people did not have a problem feeling like they could keep their online personas to themselves.

    This has changed quite a bit over the last couple years. In most cases people are using their real names in more communities and on publishing platforms. Google does a nice job of indexing all that information as well. You never know what might pop up. People simply need to get used to that and act accordingly. The choice is theirs.

  • Great stuff. Years ago when we traveled the web with a fairly broad sense of anonymity people did not have a problem feeling like they could keep their online personas to themselves.

    This has changed quite a bit over the last couple years. In most cases people are using their real names in more communities and on publishing platforms. Google does a nice job of indexing all that information as well. You never know what might pop up. People simply need to get used to that and act accordingly. The choice is theirs.

    • Very true, Adam. Thanks for the thoughts.

      My hope is this will help folks navigate those choppy waters when the boss starts getting nervous about how “Googled” his or her employees are.