What Every Company Should Know About Social Media Policy
What Every Company Should Know About Social Media Policy
by

A social media policy is a company’s first line of defense against risk in social media marketing. Shockingly, only one in three companies has a social media policy in place. While I’m sure that the majority of marketing managers and decision-makers who read Social Media Explorer are ahead of the curve, there’s a good chance your company doesn’t have a written policy.

*UPDATE* – eMarketer published a story and research on companies without social networking policies just hours after we went live with this post. 69% of American companies do not have social networking policies for employees.

Part of the problem is that a social media policy is a misnomer. Your company should have social media policies. It’s not just making rules for who can blog and say they work for you. It’s more than just telling employees what they can and cannot do on company computers. Here’s a list of some social media policies you should consider:

  • Employee Code of Conduct for Online Communications
  • Employee Code of Conduct for Company Representation in Online Communications
  • Employee Blogging Disclosure Policy
  • Employee Facebook Usage Policy
  • Employee Personal Blog Policy
  • Employee Personal Social Network Policy
  • Employee Personal Twitter Policy
  • Employee LinkedIn Policy
  • Corporate Blogging Policy
  • Corporate Blog Use Policy
  • Corporate Blog Post Approval Process
  • Corporate Blog Commenting Policy
  • Corporate Facebook Brand Page Usage Policy
  • Corporate Facebook Public Comment/Messaging Policy
  • Corporate Twitter Account Policy
  • Corporate YouTube Policy
  • Corporate YouTube Public Comment Policy
  • Company Password Policy

While it may seem frivolous to spell out policies for every social network, that’s not quite the point. Different networks have different implications for different companies. YouTube, for instance, is a fertile ground for anonymous commentors and lets-see-if-I-can-say-the-eff-word fodder. If your company or employees have reason to be on YouTube, it might be best to have a policy to prevent any future embarrassment if they’re outed as an employee while behaving like the crowds.

By having written policies for your employees in personal and company use, your customers or audience in their behavior in interacting with your company and processes in place for handling social media content production and user-generated content handling, you mitigate risk and keep your lawyers happy. In my experience, when policies are in place, the “no”s you are used to hearing from legal and compliance suddenly become “yes”es.

Social Media Policies Toolkit from Toolkit CafeWhile there are several excellent pieces of advice from around the web on what you should include in a policy or how to write your own (see below), I was recently asked to review a product called the Social Media Policies Toolkit offered by Toolkit Cafe. The Toolkit features templates for many of above types of policies. With them, you can either plug your company name in and go, or use as a basis for your policy creation.

Frankly, I was so impressed by the templates, I asked the Toolkit Cafe folks if I could not only recommend their product, but use it and even participate in any affiliate program they might have. You may have noticed their advertisement in my sidebar recently. I do recommend this product and will use it as a basis of policy creation for clients in the future. As always, I recommend the policies be customized and catered to each specific client’s needs, but the bases and best practices are covered with these templates. The kit is available for $149.00.

And yes, I do profit if you purchase after clicking on the ad or the links above. If you wish me to not profit from the recommendation, you can visit http://toolkitcafe.com and purchase free of the affiliation. Regardless, if you’re working on or planning to work on policies for your organization or clients, you should have this tool in your arsenal.

The Toolkit Cafe products (they also offer similar kits for Six Sigma, Budget & Finance, Telecommuting, Windows 7 and IT Governance) are geared toward Information Technology managers and directors, but are wholly useful to other disciplines.

And, as if snooping around my brain to land in this post, Seyfarth Shaw Attorneys emailed me last night to let me know of a webinar they are producing tomorrow, Feb. 4, at 1 p.m. ET, called “Untangling Web 2.0: Understanding The Implications of Social Media In The Workplace.” The webinar is free for the firm’s clients and $100 for non-clients. I plan on attending to see what Seyfarth Shaw labor and employment attorney Devjani Mishra has to say about risk and social media. The webinar is scheduled to include tips for implementing an effective social media policy, best practices for the use of social media to attract and screen job applicants and special consideration for employer-sponsored social media activity.

While I know little about Mrs. Mishra or Seyfarth Shaw and cannot endorse the information they’ll present (I’ve not seen it), the legal perspective will be good to hear. I promise to report back … likely live on Twitter.

Does your company have a written policy? Does it include all or part of the above listing? What challenges did you find writing it? If you haven’t written one yet, what specific company challenges are you concerned about. Share if you can and let’s discuss in the comments.

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About the Author

Jason Falls
Jason Falls is the founder of Social Media Explorer and one of the most notable and outspoken voices in the social media marketing industry. He is a noted marketing keynote speaker, author of two books and unapologetic bourbon aficionado. He can also be found at JasonFalls.com.
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  • John E Lincoln

    You have done a good job to lay out the requirements of a social media policy. In my opinion, it is very important that the policy be expressed to the companies employees. When things are left unsaid that is when we get in trouble. For instance, say one of your employees feels it is safe to make remarks about the company online and one happens to be negative. For the companies sake, and for their sake, they need to know that that information can be made easily public and they could get in trouble. I've reviewed a few policies and i have to say that i really like HPs social media policy. Also, IBM has a good policy if you want to keep things a little bit more tightly regulated. Overall i think this is a good post. I have written a blog on this as well at: http://www.seoinc.com/seo-blog/company-social-m

    There is also some good information in there. I think where companies need to be the most careful is on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Would you agree?

  • I think having a social media policy demotes other forms of communication, and interacting respectfully with customers is something that should be part of a company culture, across all modes of communication. If you need a social media policy, you're doing something wrong in hiring, training or culture.

    More comments here:
    http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/615

  • I think having a social media policy demotes other forms of communication, and interacting respectfully with customers is something that should be part of a company culture, across all modes of communication. If you need a social media policy, you're doing something wrong in hiring, training or culture.

    More comments here:
    http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/615

  • kellybriefworld

    As an IT consultant I am fully aware that IT management is struggling with whether social media is productive or obstructive for companies and their employees. Software is being developed and policy and restrictions are being decided everyday by IT managers. The security of company networks are at stake but the potential for innovation using social media is a large enough carrot for the discussion of how to properly utilize the medium continues. Palo Alto networks came up with a whitepaper, http://bit.ly/d2NZRp, which will explore the issues surrounding social media in the workplace. It is important to not only understand the immediate benefits of doing business how one lives, but the threat it presents to a company's greater ROI and productivity when it comes to the server's safety and security.
    If your IT Department wants to block social media apps on the company network… http://bit.ly/d2NZRp and http://bit.ly/cR80Al

  • Excellent points. I included you in my article on Inc.com. Thanks so much for your insight.
    http://www.inc.com/guides/2010/05/writing-a-soc

  • Awesome. Glad I could help out. Hopefully, the policies toolkit can help you
    as well. Enjoy!

  • Awesome. Glad I could help out. Hopefully, the policies toolkit can help you
    as well. Enjoy!

  • sss3045230

    Jason,
    This is great stuff! It is giving me the “push” I need to develop a policy/rules etc. at Hosparus.
    thanks,
    Stephanie

  • sss3045230

    Jason,
    This is great stuff! It is giving me the “push” I need to develop a policy/rules etc. at Hosparus.
    thanks,
    Stephanie

  • sss3045230

    Jason,
    This is great stuff! It is giving me the “push” I need to develop a policy/rules etc. at Hosparus.
    thanks,
    Stephanie

    • Awesome. Glad I could help out. Hopefully, the policies toolkit can help you
      as well. Enjoy!

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  • socialmediaexpert258

    Every company should understand the pros and cons of social media marketing. Goods share.

  • socialmediaexpert258

    Every company should understand the pros and cons of social media marketing. Goods share.

  • socialmediaexpert258

    Every company should understand the pros and cons of social media marketing. Goods share.

  • Didn't take it as criticism. No worries.

    Here's the Dominoes fiasco on Consumerist:

    http://consumerist.com/2009/04/dominos-rogue-em

    I'll see your three cents and raise you to four! Heh.

  • Didn't take it as criticism. No worries.

    Here's the Dominoes fiasco on Consumerist:

    http://consumerist.com/2009/04/dominos-rogue-em

    I'll see your three cents and raise you to four! Heh.

  • Yst

    Hi Jason,
    1) Looking back, I think my post sounded a little bit critical and that wasn't my intent, I intended only discussion, sorry. :-).
    2) Actually, I think I missed the pizza video, care to fill me in?
    3) Yes, true I agree with your point three. I've certainly seen my fair share (and some of these common sense “lackers” are at the VP level and above). For example, my friend worked with a Fortune 500 company VP whose idea of “marketing” was basically hiring people to spam.

    Only intentionally critical part: you're wrong, 3 cent sounds perfectly fine! ;-)

  • Yst

    Hi Jason,
    1) Looking back, I think my post sounded a little bit critical and that wasn't my intent, I intended only discussion, sorry. :-).
    2) Actually, I think I missed the pizza video, care to fill me in?
    3) Yes, true I agree with your point three. I've certainly seen my fair share (and some of these common sense “lackers” are at the VP level and above). For example, my friend worked with a Fortune 500 company VP whose idea of “marketing” was basically hiring people to spam.

    Only intentionally critical part: you're wrong, 3 cent sounds perfectly fine! ;-)

  • Fair points, but keep in mind that many companies, especially larger ones,
    hire employees at all education and experience levels. The simple fact of
    the matter is that many people don't have much common sense when it comes to
    these type of things. Did you see the Dominoes Pizza video from last spring?
    Can you fathom any reasonably intelligent human beings doing that? Policies
    exist because not everyone knows better.

    I agree that a lot of cumbersome policies can be restrictive, but you should
    always have something on file that the employees have to be aware of that
    covers your ass as a company, employer and employee. My two cents … just
    because three cents sounds weird. Heh.

  • Fair points, but keep in mind that many companies, especially larger ones,
    hire employees at all education and experience levels. The simple fact of
    the matter is that many people don't have much common sense when it comes to
    these type of things. Did you see the Dominoes Pizza video from last spring?
    Can you fathom any reasonably intelligent human beings doing that? Policies
    exist because not everyone knows better.

    I agree that a lot of cumbersome policies can be restrictive, but you should
    always have something on file that the employees have to be aware of that
    covers your ass as a company, employer and employee. My two cents … just
    because three cents sounds weird. Heh.

  • Yst

    I think too many policies though makes people feel like elementary school children though?
    Anyone agree? I mean we're adults, we can figure out what is good for ourselves on our own.

    For example, a friend of a friend of mine was given an instruction manual on how to wear the corporate badge. Another company had a policy on the number of family photos you can have at your desk (is it too distracting?)

    I think having a whole textbook on social media contact at a company is basically turning the company into an elementary school classroom.

    My 3 cent (why do they call it two cent anyway? ).

  • Yst

    I think too many policies though makes people feel like elementary school children though?
    Anyone agree? I mean we're adults, we can figure out what is good for ourselves on our own.

    For example, a friend of a friend of mine was given an instruction manual on how to wear the corporate badge. Another company had a policy on the number of family photos you can have at your desk (is it too distracting?)

    I think having a whole textbook on social media contact at a company is basically turning the company into an elementary school classroom.

    My 3 cent (why do they call it two cent anyway? ).

  • Yst

    I think too many policies though makes people feel like elementary school children though?
    Anyone agree? I mean we're adults, we can figure out what is good for ourselves on our own.

    For example, a friend of a friend of mine was given an instruction manual on how to wear the corporate badge. Another company had a policy on the number of family photos you can have at your desk (is it too distracting?)

    I think having a whole textbook on social media contact at a company is basically turning the company into an elementary school classroom.

    My 3 cent (why do they call it two cent anyway? ).

    • Fair points, but keep in mind that many companies, especially larger ones,
      hire employees at all education and experience levels. The simple fact of
      the matter is that many people don't have much common sense when it comes to
      these type of things. Did you see the Dominoes Pizza video from last spring?
      Can you fathom any reasonably intelligent human beings doing that? Policies
      exist because not everyone knows better.

      I agree that a lot of cumbersome policies can be restrictive, but you should
      always have something on file that the employees have to be aware of that
      covers your ass as a company, employer and employee. My two cents … just
      because three cents sounds weird. Heh.

      • Yst

        Hi Jason,
        1) Looking back, I think my post sounded a little bit critical and that wasn't my intent, I intended only discussion, sorry. :-).
        2) Actually, I think I missed the pizza video, care to fill me in?
        3) Yes, true I agree with your point three. I've certainly seen my fair share (and some of these common sense “lackers” are at the VP level and above). For example, my friend worked with a Fortune 500 company VP whose idea of “marketing” was basically hiring people to spam.

        Only intentionally critical part: you're wrong, 3 cent sounds perfectly fine! ;-)

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    http://www.onlineuniversalwork.com

  • Thank you, Kathi. Great to hear some on-the-ground perspectives. Keep
    pushing for adoption and understanding. You're making your company better
    for doing so.

  • Thank you, Kathi. Great to hear some on-the-ground perspectives. Keep
    pushing for adoption and understanding. You're making your company better
    for doing so.

  • kkwiatko

    I think many people feel that these guidelines are just common sense and that there's no reason to formalize them. I don't think that's true. I believe that companies would be best served by creating the policy and publicizing it among employees. Our firm has an enterprise-wide policy that honestly isn't that comprehensive or well-known. The only reason that I'm aware of it is because I'm heading up our division's social media efforts. I'm finding that's not a good thing as I start fielding questions from co-workers. Granted, I'm in a unique position because we're in such a heavily regulated industry. I can't mention my company name or post links back to the company Web site, and technically, my LinkedIn profile may need to be reviewed by my compliance department. I'm pushing for us to get these policies in place ASAP before someone who doesn't know any better unknowingly gets us into trouble. Again, extreme scenario for us, but I think by taking the time and being prepared, you may avoid a mess later down the road.

    Thanks for the resources – we'll be checking them out as we prepare our policy.

  • kkwiatko

    I think many people feel that these guidelines are just common sense and that there's no reason to formalize them. I don't think that's true. I believe that companies would be best served by creating the policy and publicizing it among employees. Our firm has an enterprise-wide policy that honestly isn't that comprehensive or well-known. The only reason that I'm aware of it is because I'm heading up our division's social media efforts. I'm finding that's not a good thing as I start fielding questions from co-workers. Granted, I'm in a unique position because we're in such a heavily regulated industry. I can't mention my company name or post links back to the company Web site, and technically, my LinkedIn profile may need to be reviewed by my compliance department. I'm pushing for us to get these policies in place ASAP before someone who doesn't know any better unknowingly gets us into trouble. Again, extreme scenario for us, but I think by taking the time and being prepared, you may avoid a mess later down the road.

    Thanks for the resources – we'll be checking them out as we prepare our policy.

  • I think many people feel that these guidelines are just common sense and that there's no reason to formalize them. I don't think that's true. I believe that companies would be best served by creating the policy and publicizing it among employees. Our firm has an enterprise-wide policy that honestly isn't that comprehensive or well-known. The only reason that I'm aware of it is because I'm heading up our division's social media efforts. I'm finding that's not a good thing as I start fielding questions from co-workers. Granted, I'm in a unique position because we're in such a heavily regulated industry. I can't mention my company name or post links back to the company Web site, and technically, my LinkedIn profile may need to be reviewed by my compliance department. I'm pushing for us to get these policies in place ASAP before someone who doesn't know any better unknowingly gets us into trouble. Again, extreme scenario for us, but I think by taking the time and being prepared, you may avoid a mess later down the road.

    Thanks for the resources – we'll be checking them out as we prepare our policy.

    • Thank you, Kathi. Great to hear some on-the-ground perspectives. Keep
      pushing for adoption and understanding. You're making your company better
      for doing so.

  • Interesting to hear some different perspectives. At least they're not being
    absolute about not being on Facebook or Twitter. And if it's working for you
    and your co-workers, it's reasonable for your company. (Not what I'd
    recommend, but that's not my per view, either.) Thanks for sharing.

  • Interesting to hear some different perspectives. At least they're not being
    absolute about not being on Facebook or Twitter. And if it's working for you
    and your co-workers, it's reasonable for your company. (Not what I'd
    recommend, but that's not my per view, either.) Thanks for sharing.

  • sylvawilson

    At my job they simply said “Please do not friend any co-workers or people who you do business with on Twitter or Facebook. It doesn't make our company look good if you have alcohol (no we are not a regligious corporation…far from it) and if you are dancing wildly on the dance floor…” I was happy about the new rule, because I always felt like I HAD to friend my co-workers who I really didn't want in my personal life that much. Also, I do think there is a need for the policy, but it can go too far on the other hand too. If someone wanted to curb what I say on my blog, I would be heart broken.

  • sylvawilson

    At my job they simply said “Please do not friend any co-workers or people who you do business with on Twitter or Facebook. It doesn't make our company look good if you have alcohol (no we are not a regligious corporation…far from it) and if you are dancing wildly on the dance floor…” I was happy about the new rule, because I always felt like I HAD to friend my co-workers who I really didn't want in my personal life that much. Also, I do think there is a need for the policy, but it can go too far on the other hand too. If someone wanted to curb what I say on my blog, I would be heart broken.

  • sylvawilson

    At my job they simply said “Please do not friend any co-workers or people who you do business with on Twitter or Facebook. It doesn't make our company look good if you have alcohol (no we are not a regligious corporation…far from it) and if you are dancing wildly on the dance floor…” I was happy about the new rule, because I always felt like I HAD to friend my co-workers who I really didn't want in my personal life that much. Also, I do think there is a need for the policy, but it can go too far on the other hand too. If someone wanted to curb what I say on my blog, I would be heart broken.

    • Interesting to hear some different perspectives. At least they're not being
      absolute about not being on Facebook or Twitter. And if it's working for you
      and your co-workers, it's reasonable for your company. (Not what I'd
      recommend, but that's not my per view, either.) Thanks for sharing.

  • Totally agree with you that not everyone is an “it-getter”, which is why policies and guides are needed. I'm certainly not suggesting that companies don't need something in place for risk management and to set the tone either.

    I think I may have misunderstood (it was early) and thought you were suggesting having multiple and separate documents for every element of a company's social media presence. My point was really that existing policies usually cover the basics like disclosure and confidentiality – your social media document should educate your staff on things like transparency, the reactionary nature of social media, and how to be successful when representing your employer online.

  • Totally agree with you that not everyone is an “it-getter”, which is why policies and guides are needed. I'm certainly not suggesting that companies don't need something in place for risk management and to set the tone either.

    I think I may have misunderstood (it was early) and thought you were suggesting having multiple and separate documents for every element of a company's social media presence. My point was really that existing policies usually cover the basics like disclosure and confidentiality – your social media document should educate your staff on things like transparency, the reactionary nature of social media, and how to be successful when representing your employer online.

  • Awesome, Maddie. Thanks for the link. I'll check it out.

  • Awesome, Maddie. Thanks for the link. I'll check it out.

  • Thanks David. There's a big difference between “policy” and “instructions.”
    Not having a policy in place is like going into a joint business venture
    without a written agreement. Someone is going to get screwed.

    And policies don't have to be imposing or big-brother-ish. I wrote something
    like this in a policy once: “The company embraces your right and ability to
    learn and grow through online connections. We want you to be online. These
    parameters are only to serve as written reminders that in being online, you
    represent the company whether you think you do or not. When in doubt, do
    what's best for both of us and you're probably going to be in good shape.”

    I think it's brave, but somewhat foolish, to say, “Screw policies. We don't
    need 'em.” And that approach doesn't scale, either. The larger the company,
    the higher chance you'll have employees with online access who you can't
    really trust. Not everyone is an “it-getter” and companies need to account
    for that.

    Make sense?

  • Thanks David. There's a big difference between “policy” and “instructions.”
    Not having a policy in place is like going into a joint business venture
    without a written agreement. Someone is going to get screwed.

    And policies don't have to be imposing or big-brother-ish. I wrote something
    like this in a policy once: “The company embraces your right and ability to
    learn and grow through online connections. We want you to be online. These
    parameters are only to serve as written reminders that in being online, you
    represent the company whether you think you do or not. When in doubt, do
    what's best for both of us and you're probably going to be in good shape.”

    I think it's brave, but somewhat foolish, to say, “Screw policies. We don't
    need 'em.” And that approach doesn't scale, either. The larger the company,
    the higher chance you'll have employees with online access who you can't
    really trust. Not everyone is an “it-getter” and companies need to account
    for that.

    Make sense?

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  • Not sure I agree with you on this… Why mire your employees with numerous policies?

    Chances are you already have policies in place that deal with electronic communication, privacy and confientiality etc. We're in the process of implementing one social media guideline document that is intended to provide employees with a guide – not explicit instructions on how to use each platform.

    While I think you can look at processes within your marketing dept etc. if they're leading the charge from a corporate perspective, having a large number of policies like this will only scare people off. You've got to make it easy for people to be ambassadors for your brand!

  • Not sure I agree with you on this… Why mire your employees with numerous policies?

    Chances are you already have policies in place that deal with electronic communication, privacy and confientiality etc. We're in the process of implementing one social media guideline document that is intended to provide employees with a guide – not explicit instructions on how to use each platform.

    While I think you can look at processes within your marketing dept etc. if they're leading the charge from a corporate perspective, having a large number of policies like this will only scare people off. You've got to make it easy for people to be ambassadors for your brand!

  • Not sure I agree with you on this… Why mire your employees with numerous policies?

    Chances are you already have policies in place that deal with electronic communication, privacy and confientiality etc. We're in the process of implementing one social media guideline document that is intended to provide employees with a guide – not explicit instructions on how to use each platform.

    While I think you can look at processes within your marketing dept etc. if they're leading the charge from a corporate perspective, having a large number of policies like this will only scare people off. You've got to make it easy for people to be ambassadors for your brand!

    • Thanks David. There's a big difference between “policy” and “instructions.”
      Not having a policy in place is like going into a joint business venture
      without a written agreement. Someone is going to get screwed.

      And policies don't have to be imposing or big-brother-ish. I wrote something
      like this in a policy once: “The company embraces your right and ability to
      learn and grow through online connections. We want you to be online. These
      parameters are only to serve as written reminders that in being online, you
      represent the company whether you think you do or not. When in doubt, do
      what's best for both of us and you're probably going to be in good shape.”

      I think it's brave, but somewhat foolish, to say, “Screw policies. We don't
      need 'em.” And that approach doesn't scale, either. The larger the company,
      the higher chance you'll have employees with online access who you can't
      really trust. Not everyone is an “it-getter” and companies need to account
      for that.

      Make sense?

      • Totally agree with you that not everyone is an “it-getter”, which is why policies and guides are needed. I'm certainly not suggesting that companies don't need something in place for risk management and to set the tone either.

        I think I may have misunderstood (it was early) and thought you were suggesting having multiple and separate documents for every element of a company's social media presence. My point was really that existing policies usually cover the basics like disclosure and confidentiality – your social media document should educate your staff on things like transparency, the reactionary nature of social media, and how to be successful when representing your employer online.

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  • Hey Jason, nice post. I'll definitely check out the toolkit! Just FYI we wrote a white paper on social media policies as they specifically relate to associations (membership organizations) – http://www.socialfish.org/whitepaper – might be of interest to some of your readers.

    See you in NYC at EventCamp!

  • Hey Jason, nice post. I'll definitely check out the toolkit! Just FYI we wrote a white paper on social media policies as they specifically relate to associations (membership organizations) – http://www.socialfish.org/whitepaper – might be of interest to some of your readers.

    See you in NYC at EventCamp!

  • Hey Jason, nice post. I'll definitely check out the toolkit! Just FYI we wrote a white paper on social media policies as they specifically relate to associations (membership organizations) – http://www.socialfish.org/whitepaper – might be of interest to some of your readers.

    See you in NYC at EventCamp!

    • Awesome, Maddie. Thanks for the link. I'll check it out.

  • Thanks, Shannon! I appreciate the pass along and you stopping by!

  • Thanks, Shannon! I appreciate the pass along and you stopping by!

  • This is fantastic information Jason and a topic of discussion that came up at Canada eConnect (#CEC2010) last week. Many companies want to use social media, but they are also worried about implications and if they should have social media guidelines. I'll be passing this along.

  • This is fantastic information Jason and a topic of discussion that came up at Canada eConnect (#CEC2010) last week. Many companies want to use social media, but they are also worried about implications and if they should have social media guidelines. I'll be passing this along.

  • This is fantastic information Jason and a topic of discussion that came up at Canada eConnect (#CEC2010) last week. Many companies want to use social media, but they are also worried about implications and if they should have social media guidelines. I'll be passing this along.

    • Thanks, Shannon! I appreciate the pass along and you stopping by!

  • Thanks Anna. Glad to be of service.

  • Thanks Anna. Glad to be of service.

  • Thanks for the information Jason. I am actually finalizing the social media policy for the company I work for but this gives me some information to process.
    Good tips.

  • Thanks for the information Jason. I am actually finalizing the social media policy for the company I work for but this gives me some information to process.
    Good tips.

  • Thanks for the information Jason. I am actually finalizing the social media policy for the company I work for but this gives me some information to process.
    Good tips.

  • Well said, Scott. Thanks for that. Wonderful perspective.

  • Well said, Scott. Thanks for that. Wonderful perspective.

  • scotttownsend

    The Toolkit Cafe sounds like a great way for businesses to get started with their social media policy. I would agree that everyone needs guidelines in the workplace and the social media area is no exception. Boundaries are funny if you think about it… they really free you up and are empowering.

  • scotttownsend

    The Toolkit Cafe sounds like a great way for businesses to get started with their social media policy. I would agree that everyone needs guidelines in the workplace and the social media area is no exception. Boundaries are funny if you think about it… they really free you up and are empowering.

  • scotttownsend

    The Toolkit Cafe sounds like a great way for businesses to get started with their social media policy. I would agree that everyone needs guidelines in the workplace and the social media area is no exception. Boundaries are funny if you think about it… they really free you up and are empowering.

    • Well said, Scott. Thanks for that. Wonderful perspective.