Why Social Media Will Not Get You A Job In A Recession - Social Media Explorer
Why Social Media Will Not Get You A Job In A Recession
Why Social Media Will Not Get You A Job In A Recession
by
Jason Falls
Jason Falls

I love the optimism springing forth from the social media evangelists. It’s almost like because we have social media, none of us “insiders” have to worry about tough economic times, losing our jobs or finding new ones. I’ve got news for you. Not only have social media advocates not had enough time in most organizations to illustrate the benefits of their positions, but the classically trained marketers and executives that are making hiring and firing decisions probably think the social media bible-thumpers are nuts.

Social media might be why you don’t keep your job in a recession.

Okay, so that’s a bit extreme. Blog Tip No. 173 from Falls: Don’t just say something. Say something incite-ful (notice the spelling).

No, I don’t think social media advocates are going to be the first laid off in a recession. But I would like to inject a dissenting opinion on the “social media will save you” bandwagon. Yes, having a strong personal brand and being well connected in the social media space is a good place to start to keep or find a job during tough economic times, but Twittering all day is not likely to get you hired.

Handshake by Aidan Jones on FlickrThe type of social networking that will save you or your job in a recession was, is and will always be the off-line kind.

Sure, there are anomaly examples out there of people getting jobs through Twitter conversations or connections on LinkedIn or Facebook, but let’s be honest. Most companies aren’t inside the tech bubble or hip to social media and wouldn’t think of hiring someone without a more traditional interview process. This means the social media job security utopia doesn’t exist for most of the free world.

So it all comes back to the good, old-fashioned grip-and-grin, the face-to-face, yes, dare I say, human contact, that will get you a job in a recession (or any other time for that matter.) The reason I know is that while on-line social networking is unbelievably powerful and empowering, the off-line networking is what sustains us and our businesses.

The Well-Networked Don’t Apply For Jobs, They Go Get Them

In 2006, I was a public relations professional, but in the high-walled silo of college athletics. Most folks in the mainstream heard what I did and thought, “What a joke. The guy watches ballgames for a living.” To boot, I lived six hours away from Louisville, where my wife and I wanted to return. I wanted to get out of college athletics and into mainstream marketing and public relations in a town where I had very few corporate connections or friends.

So I networked, but not on-line. Sure I solidified the LinkedIn profile (before most people knew what LinkedIn was), searched job boards and leveraged what few friends I had in marketing in Kentucky to get my name out there, but none of those put me at Doe-Anderson. What I did was pick up the phone and call people. I called everyone. Marketing managers, PR managers, HR directors, VPs, brand managers … If they were someone in Louisville and even remotely connected to the industry I was gunning for, they probably got a phone call from me.

And my approach was simple. Since I mostly got voice mail, I introduced myself, told them I was moving to Louisville and looking for opportunities and wanted to chat with them about the marketplace for their expertise and perspective. I asked them for 10 minutes on the phone, emailed them a resume and then followed up. While I didn’t do the math, I would say close to 85 or 90 percent of them not only responded, but spent 10 minutes on the phone with me chatting about jobs and companies in Louisville. I made a couple of trips and arranged for face-to-face meetings with several people on my list. Now, they not only had my resume, they knew who I was.

Within 60 days of starting my job search, I had five phone interviews, wound up with two face-to-face interviews and two job offers. Besides email, I didn’t communicate with a single person in my job search via social networks.

Now, to be fair, many of the now-recommended social networks job-related activity either didn’t exist, weren’t well populated or weren’t yet tapped for business purposes in early 2006. But if I were looking for a job today, I would go about it much the same way. Sure, I might use my connections in social media to reach people rather than using email. And, yes, I would be very open about looking for an opportunity which could lead to interest from hiring companies or managers. But the tried and true method of picking up the phone or meeting face-to-face will never be replaced by on-line communications in terms of putting an individual top of mind for a job opportunity.

And in the end, when I did land my job at Doe, even though I was the new guy in town, most of the people to know knew me.

Should you follow the advice of Rachel Levy, Mack Collier, Dan Schwabel or Michael Litman?(The British one, not the one who works at Doe-Anderson. He has an extra “t”.) Sure you should. But know and understand that all the on-line, behind-the-computer, cyber connections in the world don’t beat a hand shake, a smile and a chat.

IMAGE:Shaking Hands,” by Aidan Jones on Flickr.

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About the Author

Jason Falls
Jason Falls is the founder of Social Media Explorer and one of the most notable and outspoken voices in the social media marketing industry. He is a noted marketing keynote speaker, author of two books and unapologetic bourbon aficionado. He can also be found at JasonFalls.com.
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  • I would say close to 85 or 90 percent of them not only responded, but spent 10 minutes on the phone with me chatting about jobs and companies in Louisville.

  • I would say close to 85 or 90 percent of them not only responded, but spent 10 minutes on the phone with me chatting about jobs and companies in Louisville.

  • If anything social media can prevent you from getting a job, depending on what information you put out there. I know our company checks resumes out on line.

  • I strongly agree that the type of social networking that will save you or your job in a recession was, is and will always be the off-line kind. Thanks for sharing informative article anyway.

  • You really had a great point—nice share!
    Thanks for writing this article; this should be read by the entire applicant to give them an inspiring taught on how they going to seek a work. This will only means that being in the internet is not all, it still doing the traditional way.
    You are a good writer Jayson.

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  • Debbie

    We just interviewed an excellent applicant. Checked her out on Facebook afterward. She has 236 friends, which makes us wonder if she'll spend a lot of time on Facebook, texting, emailing, IMing, getting phone calls, etc. Plus one of her interests was “being a smart ass.” Not worth the risk on this end.

    • Although her selection of her interests was a bit offside – I don't think you can judge anything you mentioned based on 236 friends on facebook. First off, in your graduating class in high-school you probably have more than 150 people – then in University you meet another 50-100. Not to mention the random people you meet at work, through extra-curricular activities, during your childhood and just your everyday family.

      2nd – The average person on facebook has 120 friends on facebook – Just checked my facebook and not one of the five friends I clicked had less than 450. The only thing that you can judge based on their friends list is whether or not they are an extrovert or an introvert – and even that can be debated. To judge this “excellent” applicant based on 4 words is in my opinion; kind of ridiculous…

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  • Tim

    Human contact- nothing quite replaces it, and perhaps nothing ever should.

    Some great points here-

    Having said that, since we're also talking about being more creative during this economic slump, why not think outside the box of looking to work for another in the first place?

    I'm rather amazed that there are plenty of skill sets that are for whatever reason not “conventional” enough to be taught in schools, but the mastery of which would lead to more autonomy.

    Most of us are trained to be employees- nothing wrong with that, but I'm convinced that thinking that way is a kind of tunnel vision that keeps many from learning skills that would allow them to carve out there own path to income.

    One of them is as close as the computer in front of you. For the first time in history, we are 3 feet in front of the world, yet few learn how to use it in a way to render 1) value to others and 2)income for themselves.

    leavethejobbehind.com

  • Tim

    Human contact- nothing quite replaces it, and perhaps nothing ever should.

    Some great points here-

    Having said that, since we're also talking about being more creative during this economic slump, why not think outside the box of looking to work for another in the first place?

    I'm rather amazed that there are plenty of skill sets that are for whatever reason not “conventional” enough to be taught in schools, but the mastery of which would lead to more autonomy.

    Most of us are trained to be employees- nothing wrong with that, but I'm convinced that thinking that way is a kind of tunnel vision that keeps many from learning skills that would allow them to carve out there own path to income.

    One of them is as close as the computer in front of you. For the first time in history, we are 3 feet in front of the world, yet few learn how to use it in a way to render 1) value to others and 2)income for themselves.

    leavethejobbehind.com

  • Tim

    Human contact- nothing quite replaces it, and perhaps nothing ever should.

    Some great points here-

    Having said that, since we're also talking about being more creative during this economic slump, why not think outside the box of looking to work for another in the first place?

    I'm rather amazed that there are plenty of skill sets that are for whatever reason not “conventional” enough to be taught in schools, but the mastery of which would lead to more autonomy.

    Most of us are trained to be employees- nothing wrong with that, but I'm convinced that thinking that way is a kind of tunnel vision that keeps many from learning skills that would allow them to carve out there own path to income.

    One of them is as close as the computer in front of you. For the first time in history, we are 3 feet in front of the world, yet few learn how to use it in a way to render 1) value to others and 2)income for themselves.

    leavethejobbehind.com

  • Tim

    Human contact- nothing quite replaces it, and perhaps nothing ever should.

    Some great points here-

    Having said that, since we're also talking about being more creative during this economic slump, why not think outside the box of looking to work for another in the first place?

    I'm rather amazed that there are plenty of skill sets that are for whatever reason not “conventional” enough to be taught in schools, but the mastery of which would lead to more autonomy.

    Most of us are trained to be employees- nothing wrong with that, but I'm convinced that thinking that way is a kind of tunnel vision that keeps many from learning skills that would allow them to carve out there own path to income.

    One of them is as close as the computer in front of you. For the first time in history, we are 3 feet in front of the world, yet few learn how to use it in a way to render 1) value to others and 2)income for themselves.

    leavethejobbehind.com

  • Tim

    Human contact- nothing quite replaces it, and perhaps nothing ever should.

    Some great points here-

    Having said that, since we're also talking about being more creative during this economic slump, why not think outside the box of looking to work for another in the first place?

    I'm rather amazed that there are plenty of skill sets that are for whatever reason not “conventional” enough to be taught in schools, but the mastery of which would lead to more autonomy.

    Most of us are trained to be employees- nothing wrong with that, but I'm convinced that thinking that way is a kind of tunnel vision that keeps many from learning skills that would allow them to carve out there own path to income.

    One of them is as close as the computer in front of you. For the first time in history, we are 3 feet in front of the world, yet few learn how to use it in a way to render 1) value to others and 2)income for themselves.

    leavethejobbehind.com

  • Tim

    Human contact- nothing quite replaces it, and perhaps nothing ever should.

    Some great points here-

    Having said that, since we're also talking about being more creative during this economic slump, why not think outside the box of looking to work for another in the first place?

    I'm rather amazed that there are plenty of skill sets that are for whatever reason not “conventional” enough to be taught in schools, but the mastery of which would lead to more autonomy.

    Most of us are trained to be employees- nothing wrong with that, but I'm convinced that thinking that way is a kind of tunnel vision that keeps many from learning skills that would allow them to carve out there own path to income.

    One of them is as close as the computer in front of you. For the first time in history, we are 3 feet in front of the world, yet few learn how to use it in a way to render 1) value to others and 2)income for themselves.

    leavethejobbehind.com

  • Tim

    Human contact- nothing quite replaces it, and perhaps nothing ever should.

    Some great points here-

    Having said that, since we're also talking about being more creative during this economic slump, why not think outside the box of looking to work for another in the first place?

    I'm rather amazed that there are plenty of skill sets that are for whatever reason not “conventional” enough to be taught in schools, but the mastery of which would lead to more autonomy.

    Most of us are trained to be employees- nothing wrong with that, but I'm convinced that thinking that way is a kind of tunnel vision that keeps many from learning skills that would allow them to carve out there own path to income.

    One of them is as close as the computer in front of you. For the first time in history, we are 3 feet in front of the world, yet few learn how to use it in a way to render 1) value to others and 2)income for themselves.

    leavethejobbehind.com

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  • I am not convinced about Twitter in a learning and development context. I posted my thoughts here: http://learn2develop.blogspot.com/2009/02/twitt

    Chris

  • I am not convinced about Twitter in a learning and development context. I posted my thoughts here: http://learn2develop.blogspot.com/2009/02/twitt

    Chris

  • I am not convinced about Twitter in a learning and development context. I posted my thoughts here: http://learn2develop.blogspot.com/2009/02/twitt

    Chris

  • I am not convinced about Twitter in a learning and development context. I posted my thoughts here: http://learn2develop.blogspot.com/2009/02/twitt

    Chris

  • I am not convinced about Twitter in a learning and development context. I posted my thoughts here: http://learn2develop.blogspot.com/2009/02/twitt

    Chris

  • I am not convinced about Twitter in a learning and development context. I posted my thoughts here: http://learn2develop.blogspot.com/2009/02/twitt

    Chris

  • I am not convinced about Twitter in a learning and development context. I posted my thoughts here: http://learn2develop.blogspot.com/2009/02/twitt

    Chris

  • Jason, thanks for bringing us all back down to earth with some common sense! :) I think the more we dive into social media and the online world, the more we distance ourselves from what is really going on in the 'real' world. MOST people are not in the clouds with us and while having an online network is great, it's the offline meetings that usually solidify the relationships built online.

    Personally, every job I've ever gotten was because I knew someone on the inside who recommended me…and that's the offline network at work.

    I don't agree with Dan that “if you're highly connected online and then lose your job, it wont' be as hard to recover for the experienced professional.” Yes, you might have contacts that can help spread your resume around…but those people doing the hiring just aren't in the same space and they treat you like any other candidate that applied. Just my experience.

  • Jason, thanks for bringing us all back down to earth with some common sense! :) I think the more we dive into social media and the online world, the more we distance ourselves from what is really going on in the 'real' world. MOST people are not in the clouds with us and while having an online network is great, it's the offline meetings that usually solidify the relationships built online.

    Personally, every job I've ever gotten was because I knew someone on the inside who recommended me…and that's the offline network at work.

    I don't agree with Dan that “if you're highly connected online and then lose your job, it wont' be as hard to recover for the experienced professional.” Yes, you might have contacts that can help spread your resume around…but those people doing the hiring just aren't in the same space and they treat you like any other candidate that applied. Just my experience.

  • Jason, thanks for bringing us all back down to earth with some common sense! :) I think the more we dive into social media and the online world, the more we distance ourselves from what is really going on in the 'real' world. MOST people are not in the clouds with us and while having an online network is great, it's the offline meetings that usually solidify the relationships built online.

    Personally, every job I've ever gotten was because I knew someone on the inside who recommended me…and that's the offline network at work.

    I don't agree with Dan that “if you're highly connected online and then lose your job, it wont' be as hard to recover for the experienced professional.” Yes, you might have contacts that can help spread your resume around…but those people doing the hiring just aren't in the same space and they treat you like any other candidate that applied. Just my experience.

  • Jason, thanks for bringing us all back down to earth with some common sense! :) I think the more we dive into social media and the online world, the more we distance ourselves from what is really going on in the 'real' world. MOST people are not in the clouds with us and while having an online network is great, it's the offline meetings that usually solidify the relationships built online.

    Personally, every job I've ever gotten was because I knew someone on the inside who recommended me…and that's the offline network at work.

    I don't agree with Dan that “if you're highly connected online and then lose your job, it wont' be as hard to recover for the experienced professional.” Yes, you might have contacts that can help spread your resume around…but those people doing the hiring just aren't in the same space and they treat you like any other candidate that applied. Just my experience.

  • Jason, thanks for bringing us all back down to earth with some common sense! :) I think the more we dive into social media and the online world, the more we distance ourselves from what is really going on in the 'real' world. MOST people are not in the clouds with us and while having an online network is great, it's the offline meetings that usually solidify the relationships built online.

    Personally, every job I've ever gotten was because I knew someone on the inside who recommended me…and that's the offline network at work.

    I don't agree with Dan that “if you're highly connected online and then lose your job, it wont' be as hard to recover for the experienced professional.” Yes, you might have contacts that can help spread your resume around…but those people doing the hiring just aren't in the same space and they treat you like any other candidate that applied. Just my experience.

  • Jason, thanks for bringing us all back down to earth with some common sense! :) I think the more we dive into social media and the online world, the more we distance ourselves from what is really going on in the 'real' world. MOST people are not in the clouds with us and while having an online network is great, it's the offline meetings that usually solidify the relationships built online.

    Personally, every job I've ever gotten was because I knew someone on the inside who recommended me…and that's the offline network at work.

    I don't agree with Dan that “if you're highly connected online and then lose your job, it wont' be as hard to recover for the experienced professional.” Yes, you might have contacts that can help spread your resume around…but those people doing the hiring just aren't in the same space and they treat you like any other candidate that applied. Just my experience.

  • Jason, thanks for bringing us all back down to earth with some common sense! :) I think the more we dive into social media and the online world, the more we distance ourselves from what is really going on in the 'real' world. MOST people are not in the clouds with us and while having an online network is great, it's the offline meetings that usually solidify the relationships built online.

    Personally, every job I've ever gotten was because I knew someone on the inside who recommended me…and that's the offline network at work.

    I don't agree with Dan that “if you're highly connected online and then lose your job, it wont' be as hard to recover for the experienced professional.” Yes, you might have contacts that can help spread your resume around…but those people doing the hiring just aren't in the same space and they treat you like any other candidate that applied. Just my experience.

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  • susang

    Couldn't agree with you more, Jason. Knowing about social media and not looking like a dinosaur is certainly a great thing when you are interviewing. But spending all day tweeting about your random thoughts isn't the most flattering thing, either. I employed the exact tactics you're describing here when I was trying to get my first p.r. job in Nashville, and was totally new to the area. It worked like a charm. Shortly after I moved to Louisville, I became president of IABC in town, which gave me an instantaneous network that has been a boon to me for years. The last time I actually had to look for work, I was able to get three solid job offers in three weeks. (This was still the 1990s–much better times.) Later, it helped me very successfully consult while having plenty of time for my family. People still need to see you to really get a read on who you are, your credibility and your manner before they will recommend you to friends. So to those who are job hunting, never neglect the personal care and feeding of your network. And always make sure you're doing a good turn for others in your profession. Make sure you've got a lot of good will in the bank. It will sustain you no matter what the economy.

  • susang

    Couldn't agree with you more, Jason. Knowing about social media and not looking like a dinosaur is certainly a great thing when you are interviewing. But spending all day tweeting about your random thoughts isn't the most flattering thing, either. I employed the exact tactics you're describing here when I was trying to get my first p.r. job in Nashville, and was totally new to the area. It worked like a charm. Shortly after I moved to Louisville, I became president of IABC in town, which gave me an instantaneous network that has been a boon to me for years. The last time I actually had to look for work, I was able to get three solid job offers in three weeks. (This was still the 1990s–much better times.) Later, it helped me very successfully consult while having plenty of time for my family. People still need to see you to really get a read on who you are, your credibility and your manner before they will recommend you to friends. So to those who are job hunting, never neglect the personal care and feeding of your network. And always make sure you're doing a good turn for others in your profession. Make sure you've got a lot of good will in the bank. It will sustain you no matter what the economy.

  • susang

    Couldn't agree with you more, Jason. Knowing about social media and not looking like a dinosaur is certainly a great thing when you are interviewing. But spending all day tweeting about your random thoughts isn't the most flattering thing, either. I employed the exact tactics you're describing here when I was trying to get my first p.r. job in Nashville, and was totally new to the area. It worked like a charm. Shortly after I moved to Louisville, I became president of IABC in town, which gave me an instantaneous network that has been a boon to me for years. The last time I actually had to look for work, I was able to get three solid job offers in three weeks. (This was still the 1990s–much better times.) Later, it helped me very successfully consult while having plenty of time for my family. People still need to see you to really get a read on who you are, your credibility and your manner before they will recommend you to friends. So to those who are job hunting, never neglect the personal care and feeding of your network. And always make sure you're doing a good turn for others in your profession. Make sure you've got a lot of good will in the bank. It will sustain you no matter what the economy.

  • susang

    Couldn't agree with you more, Jason. Knowing about social media and not looking like a dinosaur is certainly a great thing when you are interviewing. But spending all day tweeting about your random thoughts isn't the most flattering thing, either. I employed the exact tactics you're describing here when I was trying to get my first p.r. job in Nashville, and was totally new to the area. It worked like a charm. Shortly after I moved to Louisville, I became president of IABC in town, which gave me an instantaneous network that has been a boon to me for years. The last time I actually had to look for work, I was able to get three solid job offers in three weeks. (This was still the 1990s–much better times.) Later, it helped me very successfully consult while having plenty of time for my family. People still need to see you to really get a read on who you are, your credibility and your manner before they will recommend you to friends. So to those who are job hunting, never neglect the personal care and feeding of your network. And always make sure you're doing a good turn for others in your profession. Make sure you've got a lot of good will in the bank. It will sustain you no matter what the economy.

  • susang

    Couldn't agree with you more, Jason. Knowing about social media and not looking like a dinosaur is certainly a great thing when you are interviewing. But spending all day tweeting about your random thoughts isn't the most flattering thing, either. I employed the exact tactics you're describing here when I was trying to get my first p.r. job in Nashville, and was totally new to the area. It worked like a charm. Shortly after I moved to Louisville, I became president of IABC in town, which gave me an instantaneous network that has been a boon to me for years. The last time I actually had to look for work, I was able to get three solid job offers in three weeks. (This was still the 1990s–much better times.) Later, it helped me very successfully consult while having plenty of time for my family. People still need to see you to really get a read on who you are, your credibility and your manner before they will recommend you to friends. So to those who are job hunting, never neglect the personal care and feeding of your network. And always make sure you're doing a good turn for others in your profession. Make sure you've got a lot of good will in the bank. It will sustain you no matter what the economy.

  • susang

    Couldn't agree with you more, Jason. Knowing about social media and not looking like a dinosaur is certainly a great thing when you are interviewing. But spending all day tweeting about your random thoughts isn't the most flattering thing, either. I employed the exact tactics you're describing here when I was trying to get my first p.r. job in Nashville, and was totally new to the area. It worked like a charm. Shortly after I moved to Louisville, I became president of IABC in town, which gave me an instantaneous network that has been a boon to me for years. The last time I actually had to look for work, I was able to get three solid job offers in three weeks. (This was still the 1990s–much better times.) Later, it helped me very successfully consult while having plenty of time for my family. People still need to see you to really get a read on who you are, your credibility and your manner before they will recommend you to friends. So to those who are job hunting, never neglect the personal care and feeding of your network. And always make sure you're doing a good turn for others in your profession. Make sure you've got a lot of good will in the bank. It will sustain you no matter what the economy.

  • susang

    Couldn't agree with you more, Jason. Knowing about social media and not looking like a dinosaur is certainly a great thing when you are interviewing. But spending all day tweeting about your random thoughts isn't the most flattering thing, either. I employed the exact tactics you're describing here when I was trying to get my first p.r. job in Nashville, and was totally new to the area. It worked like a charm. Shortly after I moved to Louisville, I became president of IABC in town, which gave me an instantaneous network that has been a boon to me for years. The last time I actually had to look for work, I was able to get three solid job offers in three weeks. (This was still the 1990s–much better times.) Later, it helped me very successfully consult while having plenty of time for my family. People still need to see you to really get a read on who you are, your credibility and your manner before they will recommend you to friends. So to those who are job hunting, never neglect the personal care and feeding of your network. And always make sure you're doing a good turn for others in your profession. Make sure you've got a lot of good will in the bank. It will sustain you no matter what the economy.

  • Hi Jason,

    I just thought I would step in as Michael Litman is a very good friend of mine. In my opinion both social media (whether blogs, Twitter or online communities) can help get a job but offline networking is also useful.

    Michael contacted last year via my blog asking me if I could help him get a job in social media. He firstly started freelance as I introduced him to a friend of mine that I met at a netwoking event.
    Here we have an offline / online scenario

    A few months later one of my Twitter contacts contacted me asking me if I knew anyone who was looking for a job – I referred him to Michael.

    Here we have the opposite scenario – online/offline

    I think as far as the UK market is concerned, having a social media definitely helps with job hunting and will gradually become more and more important. Out of 5 people in my office and 4 of us blog!

  • Hi Jason,

    I just thought I would step in as Michael Litman is a very good friend of mine. In my opinion both social media (whether blogs, Twitter or online communities) can help get a job but offline networking is also useful.

    Michael contacted last year via my blog asking me if I could help him get a job in social media. He firstly started freelance as I introduced him to a friend of mine that I met at a netwoking event.
    Here we have an offline / online scenario

    A few months later one of my Twitter contacts contacted me asking me if I knew anyone who was looking for a job – I referred him to Michael.

    Here we have the opposite scenario – online/offline

    I think as far as the UK market is concerned, having a social media definitely helps with job hunting and will gradually become more and more important. Out of 5 people in my office and 4 of us blog!

  • Hi Jason,

    I just thought I would step in as Michael Litman is a very good friend of mine. In my opinion both social media (whether blogs, Twitter or online communities) can help get a job but offline networking is also useful.

    Michael contacted last year via my blog asking me if I could help him get a job in social media. He firstly started freelance as I introduced him to a friend of mine that I met at a netwoking event.
    Here we have an offline / online scenario

    A few months later one of my Twitter contacts contacted me asking me if I knew anyone who was looking for a job – I referred him to Michael.

    Here we have the opposite scenario – online/offline

    I think as far as the UK market is concerned, having a social media definitely helps with job hunting and will gradually become more and more important. Out of 5 people in my office and 4 of us blog!

  • Hi Jason,

    I just thought I would step in as Michael Litman is a very good friend of mine. In my opinion both social media (whether blogs, Twitter or online communities) can help get a job but offline networking is also useful.

    Michael contacted last year via my blog asking me if I could help him get a job in social media. He firstly started freelance as I introduced him to a friend of mine that I met at a netwoking event.
    Here we have an offline / online scenario

    A few months later one of my Twitter contacts contacted me asking me if I knew anyone who was looking for a job – I referred him to Michael.

    Here we have the opposite scenario – online/offline

    I think as far as the UK market is concerned, having a social media definitely helps with job hunting and will gradually become more and more important. Out of 5 people in my office and 4 of us blog!

  • Hi Jason,

    I just thought I would step in as Michael Litman is a very good friend of mine. In my opinion both social media (whether blogs, Twitter or online communities) can help get a job but offline networking is also useful.

    Michael contacted last year via my blog asking me if I could help him get a job in social media. He firstly started freelance as I introduced him to a friend of mine that I met at a netwoking event.
    Here we have an offline / online scenario

    A few months later one of my Twitter contacts contacted me asking me if I knew anyone who was looking for a job – I referred him to Michael.

    Here we have the opposite scenario – online/offline

    I think as far as the UK market is concerned, having a social media definitely helps with job hunting and will gradually become more and more important. Out of 5 people in my office and 4 of us blog!

  • Hi Jason,

    I just thought I would step in as Michael Litman is a very good friend of mine. In my opinion both social media (whether blogs, Twitter or online communities) can help get a job but offline networking is also useful.

    Michael contacted last year via my blog asking me if I could help him get a job in social media. He firstly started freelance as I introduced him to a friend of mine that I met at a netwoking event.
    Here we have an offline / online scenario

    A few months later one of my Twitter contacts contacted me asking me if I knew anyone who was looking for a job – I referred him to Michael.

    Here we have the opposite scenario – online/offline

    I think as far as the UK market is concerned, having a social media definitely helps with job hunting and will gradually become more and more important. Out of 5 people in my office and 4 of us blog!

  • Hi Jason,

    I just thought I would step in as Michael Litman is a very good friend of mine. In my opinion both social media (whether blogs, Twitter or online communities) can help get a job but offline networking is also useful.

    Michael contacted last year via my blog asking me if I could help him get a job in social media. He firstly started freelance as I introduced him to a friend of mine that I met at a netwoking event.
    Here we have an offline / online scenario

    A few months later one of my Twitter contacts contacted me asking me if I knew anyone who was looking for a job – I referred him to Michael.

    Here we have the opposite scenario – online/offline

    I think as far as the UK market is concerned, having a social media definitely helps with job hunting and will gradually become more and more important. Out of 5 people in my office and 4 of us blog!

  • :-) I just had to work the price in there to get to the “Priceless” tag line.. a bit contorted, but it was early in the morning .. thanks for playing along and thanks for not judging me :-)

    The economy will bounce back. The organizations that have been doing SM right will have members craving for human contact. The ones that do it exceedingly well will have stoked value into the equation and will profit nicely early on.

  • :-) I just had to work the price in there to get to the “Priceless” tag line.. a bit contorted, but it was early in the morning .. thanks for playing along and thanks for not judging me :-)

    The economy will bounce back. The organizations that have been doing SM right will have members craving for human contact. The ones that do it exceedingly well will have stoked value into the equation and will profit nicely early on.

  • :-) I just had to work the price in there to get to the “Priceless” tag line.. a bit contorted, but it was early in the morning .. thanks for playing along and thanks for not judging me :-)

    The economy will bounce back. The organizations that have been doing SM right will have members craving for human contact. The ones that do it exceedingly well will have stoked value into the equation and will profit nicely early on.

  • :-) I just had to work the price in there to get to the “Priceless” tag line.. a bit contorted, but it was early in the morning .. thanks for playing along and thanks for not judging me :-)

    The economy will bounce back. The organizations that have been doing SM right will have members craving for human contact. The ones that do it exceedingly well will have stoked value into the equation and will profit nicely early on.

  • :-) I just had to work the price in there to get to the “Priceless” tag line.. a bit contorted, but it was early in the morning .. thanks for playing along and thanks for not judging me :-)

    The economy will bounce back. The organizations that have been doing SM right will have members craving for human contact. The ones that do it exceedingly well will have stoked value into the equation and will profit nicely early on.

  • :-) I just had to work the price in there to get to the “Priceless” tag line.. a bit contorted, but it was early in the morning .. thanks for playing along and thanks for not judging me :-)

    The economy will bounce back. The organizations that have been doing SM right will have members craving for human contact. The ones that do it exceedingly well will have stoked value into the equation and will profit nicely early on.

  • Pingback: Social media is building value for human touch | GerardMcLean.com()

  • Rufus, I'm not sure how to respond to your comment other than to say I would think the trade show business might prove beneficial for the interpersonal networking offline, but with the economy the way it is, trade shows will be less attended and not as profitable for companies there.

    You're right that social media is creating greater value for the human touch, but putting a price tag on it is a little weird. Of course, I'm theoretically responding to a dog, so I shouldn't judge, right?

  • Rufus, I'm not sure how to respond to your comment other than to say I would think the trade show business might prove beneficial for the interpersonal networking offline, but with the economy the way it is, trade shows will be less attended and not as profitable for companies there.

    You're right that social media is creating greater value for the human touch, but putting a price tag on it is a little weird. Of course, I'm theoretically responding to a dog, so I shouldn't judge, right?

  • Rufus, I'm not sure how to respond to your comment other than to say I would think the trade show business might prove beneficial for the interpersonal networking offline, but with the economy the way it is, trade shows will be less attended and not as profitable for companies there.

    You're right that social media is creating greater value for the human touch, but putting a price tag on it is a little weird. Of course, I'm theoretically responding to a dog, so I shouldn't judge, right?

  • Rufus, I'm not sure how to respond to your comment other than to say I would think the trade show business might prove beneficial for the interpersonal networking offline, but with the economy the way it is, trade shows will be less attended and not as profitable for companies there.

    You're right that social media is creating greater value for the human touch, but putting a price tag on it is a little weird. Of course, I'm theoretically responding to a dog, so I shouldn't judge, right?

  • Rufus, I'm not sure how to respond to your comment other than to say I would think the trade show business might prove beneficial for the interpersonal networking offline, but with the economy the way it is, trade shows will be less attended and not as profitable for companies there.

    You're right that social media is creating greater value for the human touch, but putting a price tag on it is a little weird. Of course, I'm theoretically responding to a dog, so I shouldn't judge, right?

  • Rufus, I'm not sure how to respond to your comment other than to say I would think the trade show business might prove beneficial for the interpersonal networking offline, but with the economy the way it is, trade shows will be less attended and not as profitable for companies there.

    You're right that social media is creating greater value for the human touch, but putting a price tag on it is a little weird. Of course, I'm theoretically responding to a dog, so I shouldn't judge, right?

  • lonsafko

    Yeah… We are really proud of it. – Lon

  • lonsafko

    Yeah… We are really proud of it. – Lon

  • lonsafko

    Yeah… We are really proud of it. – Lon

  • lonsafko

    Yeah… We are really proud of it. – Lon

  • lonsafko

    Yeah… We are really proud of it. – Lon

  • lonsafko

    Yeah… We are really proud of it. – Lon

  • lonsafko

    Yeah… We are really proud of it. – Lon

  • Jason, do you have any opinions on how social media can help dogs out in this recession?

    My opinion on all this social media is it is creating value for human touch. A handshake will be worth $1,000, a smile $3,500 and a hug; priceless. (Sorry, you can't by your way into scratching me behind the ears, but we can still talk :-) )

    On the business side of things, I think we will see a resurgence of the trade show for organizations that can weather this economy. But, since they will have a new-found value, they will not be for the unwashed masses. Will be interesting for trade associations who are on watching all this and on the ball.

  • Jason, do you have any opinions on how social media can help dogs out in this recession?

    My opinion on all this social media is it is creating value for human touch. A handshake will be worth $1,000, a smile $3,500 and a hug; priceless. (Sorry, you can't by your way into scratching me behind the ears, but we can still talk :-) )

    On the business side of things, I think we will see a resurgence of the trade show for organizations that can weather this economy. But, since they will have a new-found value, they will not be for the unwashed masses. Will be interesting for trade associations who are on watching all this and on the ball.

  • Jason, do you have any opinions on how social media can help dogs out in this recession?

    My opinion on all this social media is it is creating value for human touch. A handshake will be worth $1,000, a smile $3,500 and a hug; priceless. (Sorry, you can't by your way into scratching me behind the ears, but we can still talk :-) )

    On the business side of things, I think we will see a resurgence of the trade show for organizations that can weather this economy. But, since they will have a new-found value, they will not be for the unwashed masses. Will be interesting for trade associations who are on watching all this and on the ball.

  • Jason, do you have any opinions on how social media can help dogs out in this recession?

    My opinion on all this social media is it is creating value for human touch. A handshake will be worth $1,000, a smile $3,500 and a hug; priceless. (Sorry, you can't by your way into scratching me behind the ears, but we can still talk :-) )

    On the business side of things, I think we will see a resurgence of the trade show for organizations that can weather this economy. But, since they will have a new-found value, they will not be for the unwashed masses. Will be interesting for trade associations who are on watching all this and on the ball.

  • Jason, do you have any opinions on how social media can help dogs out in this recession?

    My opinion on all this social media is it is creating value for human touch. A handshake will be worth $1,000, a smile $3,500 and a hug; priceless. (Sorry, you can't by your way into scratching me behind the ears, but we can still talk :-) )

    On the business side of things, I think we will see a resurgence of the trade show for organizations that can weather this economy. But, since they will have a new-found value, they will not be for the unwashed masses. Will be interesting for trade associations who are on watching all this and on the ball.

  • Jason, do you have any opinions on how social media can help dogs out in this recession?

    My opinion on all this social media is it is creating value for human touch. A handshake will be worth $1,000, a smile $3,500 and a hug; priceless. (Sorry, you can't by your way into scratching me behind the ears, but we can still talk :-) )

    On the business side of things, I think we will see a resurgence of the trade show for organizations that can weather this economy. But, since they will have a new-found value, they will not be for the unwashed masses. Will be interesting for trade associations who are on watching all this and on the ball.

  • Jason, do you have any opinions on how social media can help dogs out in this recession?

    My opinion on all this social media is it is creating value for human touch. A handshake will be worth $1,000, a smile $3,500 and a hug; priceless. (Sorry, you can't by your way into scratching me behind the ears, but we can still talk :-) )

    On the business side of things, I think we will see a resurgence of the trade show for organizations that can weather this economy. But, since they will have a new-found value, they will not be for the unwashed masses. Will be interesting for trade associations who are on watching all this and on the ball.

    • Rufus, I'm not sure how to respond to your comment other than to say I would think the trade show business might prove beneficial for the interpersonal networking offline, but with the economy the way it is, trade shows will be less attended and not as profitable for companies there.

      You're right that social media is creating greater value for the human touch, but putting a price tag on it is a little weird. Of course, I'm theoretically responding to a dog, so I shouldn't judge, right?

      • :-) I just had to work the price in there to get to the “Priceless” tag line.. a bit contorted, but it was early in the morning .. thanks for playing along and thanks for not judging me :-)

        The economy will bounce back. The organizations that have been doing SM right will have members craving for human contact. The ones that do it exceedingly well will have stoked value into the equation and will profit nicely early on.

  • Love the completion of the circuit metaphor. That's why you da man K.D.

  • Love the completion of the circuit metaphor. That's why you da man K.D.

  • Love the completion of the circuit metaphor. That's why you da man K.D.

  • Love the completion of the circuit metaphor. That's why you da man K.D.

  • Love the completion of the circuit metaphor. That's why you da man K.D.

  • Love the completion of the circuit metaphor. That's why you da man K.D.

  • Good idea, George. I'll be sure to follow that advice should I ever go solo or work from home.

    Try it and report back. I bet it does have a good effect.

  • Good idea, George. I'll be sure to follow that advice should I ever go solo or work from home.

    Try it and report back. I bet it does have a good effect.

  • Good idea, George. I'll be sure to follow that advice should I ever go solo or work from home.

    Try it and report back. I bet it does have a good effect.

  • Good idea, George. I'll be sure to follow that advice should I ever go solo or work from home.

    Try it and report back. I bet it does have a good effect.

  • Good idea, George. I'll be sure to follow that advice should I ever go solo or work from home.

    Try it and report back. I bet it does have a good effect.

  • Good idea, George. I'll be sure to follow that advice should I ever go solo or work from home.

    Try it and report back. I bet it does have a good effect.

  • That's funny. I work out of my home and some days I'm thankful for a client meeting so I can, you know, shower. A friend told me that when you work at home its important to get up at the same time, shower, dress for work and then to drive to a coffee shop. Drink coffee and then return as if you're commuting to work. Says it keeps you sharp. I haven't tried that yet, but I should.

  • That's funny. I work out of my home and some days I'm thankful for a client meeting so I can, you know, shower. A friend told me that when you work at home its important to get up at the same time, shower, dress for work and then to drive to a coffee shop. Drink coffee and then return as if you're commuting to work. Says it keeps you sharp. I haven't tried that yet, but I should.

  • That's funny. I work out of my home and some days I'm thankful for a client meeting so I can, you know, shower. A friend told me that when you work at home its important to get up at the same time, shower, dress for work and then to drive to a coffee shop. Drink coffee and then return as if you're commuting to work. Says it keeps you sharp. I haven't tried that yet, but I should.

  • That's funny. I work out of my home and some days I'm thankful for a client meeting so I can, you know, shower. A friend told me that when you work at home its important to get up at the same time, shower, dress for work and then to drive to a coffee shop. Drink coffee and then return as if you're commuting to work. Says it keeps you sharp. I haven't tried that yet, but I should.

  • That's funny. I work out of my home and some days I'm thankful for a client meeting so I can, you know, shower. A friend told me that when you work at home its important to get up at the same time, shower, dress for work and then to drive to a coffee shop. Drink coffee and then return as if you're commuting to work. Says it keeps you sharp. I haven't tried that yet, but I should.

  • That's funny. I work out of my home and some days I'm thankful for a client meeting so I can, you know, shower. A friend told me that when you work at home its important to get up at the same time, shower, dress for work and then to drive to a coffee shop. Drink coffee and then return as if you're commuting to work. Says it keeps you sharp. I haven't tried that yet, but I should.

  • IMHO, social media is all about the offline meeting. It is a circuit that is completed with an offline interaction. Which is my way of agreeing with your post. But perhaps a mix of the two is best. Cause if anyone offline decides to google me? Game on.

  • IMHO, social media is all about the offline meeting. It is a circuit that is completed with an offline interaction. Which is my way of agreeing with your post. But perhaps a mix of the two is best. Cause if anyone offline decides to google me? Game on.

  • IMHO, social media is all about the offline meeting. It is a circuit that is completed with an offline interaction. Which is my way of agreeing with your post. But perhaps a mix of the two is best. Cause if anyone offline decides to google me? Game on.

  • IMHO, social media is all about the offline meeting. It is a circuit that is completed with an offline interaction. Which is my way of agreeing with your post. But perhaps a mix of the two is best. Cause if anyone offline decides to google me? Game on.

  • IMHO, social media is all about the offline meeting. It is a circuit that is completed with an offline interaction. Which is my way of agreeing with your post. But perhaps a mix of the two is best. Cause if anyone offline decides to google me? Game on.

  • IMHO, social media is all about the offline meeting. It is a circuit that is completed with an offline interaction. Which is my way of agreeing with your post. But perhaps a mix of the two is best. Cause if anyone offline decides to google me? Game on.

  • IMHO, social media is all about the offline meeting. It is a circuit that is completed with an offline interaction. Which is my way of agreeing with your post. But perhaps a mix of the two is best. Cause if anyone offline decides to google me? Game on.

    • Love the completion of the circuit metaphor. That's why you da man K.D.

  • Thanks David. It's not about comments to me. It's about conversation. And me posting then never coming back to interact with the readers isn't a conversation. Plus it's arrogant. I love the back and forth. Thanks for being a part of it.

  • Thanks David. It's not about comments to me. It's about conversation. And me posting then never coming back to interact with the readers isn't a conversation. Plus it's arrogant. I love the back and forth. Thanks for being a part of it.

  • Thanks David. It's not about comments to me. It's about conversation. And me posting then never coming back to interact with the readers isn't a conversation. Plus it's arrogant. I love the back and forth. Thanks for being a part of it.

  • Thanks David. It's not about comments to me. It's about conversation. And me posting then never coming back to interact with the readers isn't a conversation. Plus it's arrogant. I love the back and forth. Thanks for being a part of it.

  • Thanks David. It's not about comments to me. It's about conversation. And me posting then never coming back to interact with the readers isn't a conversation. Plus it's arrogant. I love the back and forth. Thanks for being a part of it.

  • Thanks David. It's not about comments to me. It's about conversation. And me posting then never coming back to interact with the readers isn't a conversation. Plus it's arrogant. I love the back and forth. Thanks for being a part of it.

  • Very much agreed, George. Using on-line to open off-line opportunity is the best approach. My hope is that the post helped all those blinded by the new of social media come to the realization that they still have to comb their hair and get off the bean bag chair to get a job.

    Thanks for commenting.

  • Very much agreed, George. Using on-line to open off-line opportunity is the best approach. My hope is that the post helped all those blinded by the new of social media come to the realization that they still have to comb their hair and get off the bean bag chair to get a job.

    Thanks for commenting.

  • Very much agreed, George. Using on-line to open off-line opportunity is the best approach. My hope is that the post helped all those blinded by the new of social media come to the realization that they still have to comb their hair and get off the bean bag chair to get a job.

    Thanks for commenting.

  • Very much agreed, George. Using on-line to open off-line opportunity is the best approach. My hope is that the post helped all those blinded by the new of social media come to the realization that they still have to comb their hair and get off the bean bag chair to get a job.

    Thanks for commenting.

  • Very much agreed, George. Using on-line to open off-line opportunity is the best approach. My hope is that the post helped all those blinded by the new of social media come to the realization that they still have to comb their hair and get off the bean bag chair to get a job.

    Thanks for commenting.

  • Very much agreed, George. Using on-line to open off-line opportunity is the best approach. My hope is that the post helped all those blinded by the new of social media come to the realization that they still have to comb their hair and get off the bean bag chair to get a job.

    Thanks for commenting.

  • Yeah, Danny. You got hosed. Heh.

    Picking up clients via Twitter is do-able. I've done it, in fact. But for the most part, you're right. They wind up being tech companies or inside the social media bubble folks. For the regular CPG and other companies, it's still going to be the old fashioned networking that wins the business. At least for now.

  • Yeah, Danny. You got hosed. Heh.

    Picking up clients via Twitter is do-able. I've done it, in fact. But for the most part, you're right. They wind up being tech companies or inside the social media bubble folks. For the regular CPG and other companies, it's still going to be the old fashioned networking that wins the business. At least for now.

  • Yeah, Danny. You got hosed. Heh.

    Picking up clients via Twitter is do-able. I've done it, in fact. But for the most part, you're right. They wind up being tech companies or inside the social media bubble folks. For the regular CPG and other companies, it's still going to be the old fashioned networking that wins the business. At least for now.

  • Yeah, Danny. You got hosed. Heh.

    Picking up clients via Twitter is do-able. I've done it, in fact. But for the most part, you're right. They wind up being tech companies or inside the social media bubble folks. For the regular CPG and other companies, it's still going to be the old fashioned networking that wins the business. At least for now.

  • Yeah, Danny. You got hosed. Heh.

    Picking up clients via Twitter is do-able. I've done it, in fact. But for the most part, you're right. They wind up being tech companies or inside the social media bubble folks. For the regular CPG and other companies, it's still going to be the old fashioned networking that wins the business. At least for now.

  • Yeah, Danny. You got hosed. Heh.

    Picking up clients via Twitter is do-able. I've done it, in fact. But for the most part, you're right. They wind up being tech companies or inside the social media bubble folks. For the regular CPG and other companies, it's still going to be the old fashioned networking that wins the business. At least for now.

  • Thanks for pushing the topic out there, Rachel. I agree with you that Balance is the key. No one approach is going to always work, but a thorough one will.

    Thanks for stopping by and continuing the conversation.

  • Thanks for pushing the topic out there, Rachel. I agree with you that Balance is the key. No one approach is going to always work, but a thorough one will.

    Thanks for stopping by and continuing the conversation.

  • Thanks for pushing the topic out there, Rachel. I agree with you that Balance is the key. No one approach is going to always work, but a thorough one will.

    Thanks for stopping by and continuing the conversation.

  • Thanks for pushing the topic out there, Rachel. I agree with you that Balance is the key. No one approach is going to always work, but a thorough one will.

    Thanks for stopping by and continuing the conversation.

  • Thanks for pushing the topic out there, Rachel. I agree with you that Balance is the key. No one approach is going to always work, but a thorough one will.

    Thanks for stopping by and continuing the conversation.

  • Thanks for pushing the topic out there, Rachel. I agree with you that Balance is the key. No one approach is going to always work, but a thorough one will.

    Thanks for stopping by and continuing the conversation.

  • Pingback: Social media leader reminds us that PR is a face-to-face business « ToughSledding()

  • Hi Jason:
    I agree with your assessment about “new media” types not being safe inside organizations. I'm still amazed at how many mainstream companies think social media is hocus pocus or a trend. But there are two issues here.

    1. Keeping your current job when you're the new media guy and;

    2. Using social media to find a job.

    Social media is an excellent way to get work and find clients. It's been helping me greatly to be blogging, Twittering and using social media platforms. Not only does it demonstrate to potential clients that I know of what I speak, it is a great way to be introduced or reintroduced to people you've worked with before. That's the network you really want to tap into when you look for a job.

    Of course, in-person networking is best, but making that happen can start online.

  • Hi Jason:
    I agree with your assessment about “new media” types not being safe inside organizations. I'm still amazed at how many mainstream companies think social media is hocus pocus or a trend. But there are two issues here.

    1. Keeping your current job when you're the new media guy and;

    2. Using social media to find a job.

    Social media is an excellent way to get work and find clients. It's been helping me greatly to be blogging, Twittering and using social media platforms. Not only does it demonstrate to potential clients that I know of what I speak, it is a great way to be introduced or reintroduced to people you've worked with before. That's the network you really want to tap into when you look for a job.

    Of course, in-person networking is best, but making that happen can start online.

  • Hi Jason:
    I agree with your assessment about “new media” types not being safe inside organizations. I'm still amazed at how many mainstream companies think social media is hocus pocus or a trend. But there are two issues here.

    1. Keeping your current job when you're the new media guy and;

    2. Using social media to find a job.

    Social media is an excellent way to get work and find clients. It's been helping me greatly to be blogging, Twittering and using social media platforms. Not only does it demonstrate to potential clients that I know of what I speak, it is a great way to be introduced or reintroduced to people you've worked with before. That's the network you really want to tap into when you look for a job.

    Of course, in-person networking is best, but making that happen can start online.

  • Hi Jason:
    I agree with your assessment about “new media” types not being safe inside organizations. I'm still amazed at how many mainstream companies think social media is hocus pocus or a trend. But there are two issues here.

    1. Keeping your current job when you're the new media guy and;

    2. Using social media to find a job.

    Social media is an excellent way to get work and find clients. It's been helping me greatly to be blogging, Twittering and using social media platforms. Not only does it demonstrate to potential clients that I know of what I speak, it is a great way to be introduced or reintroduced to people you've worked with before. That's the network you really want to tap into when you look for a job.

    Of course, in-person networking is best, but making that happen can start online.

  • Hi Jason:
    I agree with your assessment about “new media” types not being safe inside organizations. I'm still amazed at how many mainstream companies think social media is hocus pocus or a trend. But there are two issues here.

    1. Keeping your current job when you're the new media guy and;

    2. Using social media to find a job.

    Social media is an excellent way to get work and find clients. It's been helping me greatly to be blogging, Twittering and using social media platforms. Not only does it demonstrate to potential clients that I know of what I speak, it is a great way to be introduced or reintroduced to people you've worked with before. That's the network you really want to tap into when you look for a job.

    Of course, in-person networking is best, but making that happen can start online.

  • Hi Jason:
    I agree with your assessment about “new media” types not being safe inside organizations. I'm still amazed at how many mainstream companies think social media is hocus pocus or a trend. But there are two issues here.

    1. Keeping your current job when you're the new media guy and;

    2. Using social media to find a job.

    Social media is an excellent way to get work and find clients. It's been helping me greatly to be blogging, Twittering and using social media platforms. Not only does it demonstrate to potential clients that I know of what I speak, it is a great way to be introduced or reintroduced to people you've worked with before. That's the network you really want to tap into when you look for a job.

    Of course, in-person networking is best, but making that happen can start online.

  • Hi Jason:
    I agree with your assessment about “new media” types not being safe inside organizations. I'm still amazed at how many mainstream companies think social media is hocus pocus or a trend. But there are two issues here.

    1. Keeping your current job when you're the new media guy and;

    2. Using social media to find a job.

    Social media is an excellent way to get work and find clients. It's been helping me greatly to be blogging, Twittering and using social media platforms. Not only does it demonstrate to potential clients that I know of what I speak, it is a great way to be introduced or reintroduced to people you've worked with before. That's the network you really want to tap into when you look for a job.

    Of course, in-person networking is best, but making that happen can start online.

    • Very much agreed, George. Using on-line to open off-line opportunity is the best approach. My hope is that the post helped all those blinded by the new of social media come to the realization that they still have to comb their hair and get off the bean bag chair to get a job.

      Thanks for commenting.

      • That's funny. I work out of my home and some days I'm thankful for a client meeting so I can, you know, shower. A friend told me that when you work at home its important to get up at the same time, shower, dress for work and then to drive to a coffee shop. Drink coffee and then return as if you're commuting to work. Says it keeps you sharp. I haven't tried that yet, but I should.

        • Good idea, George. I'll be sure to follow that advice should I ever go solo or work from home.

          Try it and report back. I bet it does have a good effect.

  • You mean that $1500 I spent on the Social Media Certificate isn't worth diddly? Dammit! ;-)

    It's funny, we were discussing this (ina roundabout kind-of-way) on #Journchat last night, about whether the Twitter pitch is worthwhile. I'd mentioned that I'd been fortunate enough to pick up three clients via Twitter, yet as you say, this wasn't massively indicative of the norm, since they were all tech companies. Or, the typical users of Twitter and social media on the whole, much like media companies and similar.

    Sure, we have some great tools to work with, but a voice and eye contact will always beat a virtual relationship, no matter how well you've built it up. At least for now.

  • You mean that $1500 I spent on the Social Media Certificate isn't worth diddly? Dammit! ;-)

    It's funny, we were discussing this (ina roundabout kind-of-way) on #Journchat last night, about whether the Twitter pitch is worthwhile. I'd mentioned that I'd been fortunate enough to pick up three clients via Twitter, yet as you say, this wasn't massively indicative of the norm, since they were all tech companies. Or, the typical users of Twitter and social media on the whole, much like media companies and similar.

    Sure, we have some great tools to work with, but a voice and eye contact will always beat a virtual relationship, no matter how well you've built it up. At least for now.

  • You mean that $1500 I spent on the Social Media Certificate isn't worth diddly? Dammit! ;-)

    It's funny, we were discussing this (ina roundabout kind-of-way) on #Journchat last night, about whether the Twitter pitch is worthwhile. I'd mentioned that I'd been fortunate enough to pick up three clients via Twitter, yet as you say, this wasn't massively indicative of the norm, since they were all tech companies. Or, the typical users of Twitter and social media on the whole, much like media companies and similar.

    Sure, we have some great tools to work with, but a voice and eye contact will always beat a virtual relationship, no matter how well you've built it up. At least for now.

  • You mean that $1500 I spent on the Social Media Certificate isn't worth diddly? Dammit! ;-)

    It's funny, we were discussing this (ina roundabout kind-of-way) on #Journchat last night, about whether the Twitter pitch is worthwhile. I'd mentioned that I'd been fortunate enough to pick up three clients via Twitter, yet as you say, this wasn't massively indicative of the norm, since they were all tech companies. Or, the typical users of Twitter and social media on the whole, much like media companies and similar.

    Sure, we have some great tools to work with, but a voice and eye contact will always beat a virtual relationship, no matter how well you've built it up. At least for now.

  • You mean that $1500 I spent on the Social Media Certificate isn't worth diddly? Dammit! ;-)

    It's funny, we were discussing this (ina roundabout kind-of-way) on #Journchat last night, about whether the Twitter pitch is worthwhile. I'd mentioned that I'd been fortunate enough to pick up three clients via Twitter, yet as you say, this wasn't massively indicative of the norm, since they were all tech companies. Or, the typical users of Twitter and social media on the whole, much like media companies and similar.

    Sure, we have some great tools to work with, but a voice and eye contact will always beat a virtual relationship, no matter how well you've built it up. At least for now.

  • You mean that $1500 I spent on the Social Media Certificate isn't worth diddly? Dammit! ;-)

    It's funny, we were discussing this (ina roundabout kind-of-way) on #Journchat last night, about whether the Twitter pitch is worthwhile. I'd mentioned that I'd been fortunate enough to pick up three clients via Twitter, yet as you say, this wasn't massively indicative of the norm, since they were all tech companies. Or, the typical users of Twitter and social media on the whole, much like media companies and similar.

    Sure, we have some great tools to work with, but a voice and eye contact will always beat a virtual relationship, no matter how well you've built it up. At least for now.

  • You mean that $1500 I spent on the Social Media Certificate isn't worth diddly? Dammit! ;-)

    It's funny, we were discussing this (ina roundabout kind-of-way) on #Journchat last night, about whether the Twitter pitch is worthwhile. I'd mentioned that I'd been fortunate enough to pick up three clients via Twitter, yet as you say, this wasn't massively indicative of the norm, since they were all tech companies. Or, the typical users of Twitter and social media on the whole, much like media companies and similar.

    Sure, we have some great tools to work with, but a voice and eye contact will always beat a virtual relationship, no matter how well you've built it up. At least for now.

    • Yeah, Danny. You got hosed. Heh.

      Picking up clients via Twitter is do-able. I've done it, in fact. But for the most part, you're right. They wind up being tech companies or inside the social media bubble folks. For the regular CPG and other companies, it's still going to be the old fashioned networking that wins the business. At least for now.

  • Larissa

    Jason – great post and I totally agree. I have been actively job searching, but I use social media as a supplement to real, personal contact. Twitter and LinkedIn have been helpful for me in finding contacts to connect with who may be able to help me with an “in” at a particular job I've applied for. It's also great to have such a big network of PR/marketing folks who are always thinking of me for projects, potential jobs, etc. I've been lucky that social media experience HAS helped me secure some cool project work, which is keeping the bills paid. The nice thing about social media and job hunting is that it helps you feel like you're not the only one out there, and you're not alone.

    ~ Larissa
    @LYF108

  • Larissa

    Jason – great post and I totally agree. I have been actively job searching, but I use social media as a supplement to real, personal contact. Twitter and LinkedIn have been helpful for me in finding contacts to connect with who may be able to help me with an “in” at a particular job I've applied for. It's also great to have such a big network of PR/marketing folks who are always thinking of me for projects, potential jobs, etc. I've been lucky that social media experience HAS helped me secure some cool project work, which is keeping the bills paid. The nice thing about social media and job hunting is that it helps you feel like you're not the only one out there, and you're not alone.

    ~ Larissa
    @LYF108

  • Larissa

    Jason – great post and I totally agree. I have been actively job searching, but I use social media as a supplement to real, personal contact. Twitter and LinkedIn have been helpful for me in finding contacts to connect with who may be able to help me with an “in” at a particular job I've applied for. It's also great to have such a big network of PR/marketing folks who are always thinking of me for projects, potential jobs, etc. I've been lucky that social media experience HAS helped me secure some cool project work, which is keeping the bills paid. The nice thing about social media and job hunting is that it helps you feel like you're not the only one out there, and you're not alone.

    ~ Larissa
    @LYF108

  • Larissa

    Jason – great post and I totally agree. I have been actively job searching, but I use social media as a supplement to real, personal contact. Twitter and LinkedIn have been helpful for me in finding contacts to connect with who may be able to help me with an “in” at a particular job I've applied for. It's also great to have such a big network of PR/marketing folks who are always thinking of me for projects, potential jobs, etc. I've been lucky that social media experience HAS helped me secure some cool project work, which is keeping the bills paid. The nice thing about social media and job hunting is that it helps you feel like you're not the only one out there, and you're not alone.

    ~ Larissa
    @LYF108

  • Larissa

    Jason – great post and I totally agree. I have been actively job searching, but I use social media as a supplement to real, personal contact. Twitter and LinkedIn have been helpful for me in finding contacts to connect with who may be able to help me with an “in” at a particular job I've applied for. It's also great to have such a big network of PR/marketing folks who are always thinking of me for projects, potential jobs, etc. I've been lucky that social media experience HAS helped me secure some cool project work, which is keeping the bills paid. The nice thing about social media and job hunting is that it helps you feel like you're not the only one out there, and you're not alone.

    ~ Larissa
    @LYF108

  • Larissa

    Jason – great post and I totally agree. I have been actively job searching, but I use social media as a supplement to real, personal contact. Twitter and LinkedIn have been helpful for me in finding contacts to connect with who may be able to help me with an “in” at a particular job I've applied for. It's also great to have such a big network of PR/marketing folks who are always thinking of me for projects, potential jobs, etc. I've been lucky that social media experience HAS helped me secure some cool project work, which is keeping the bills paid. The nice thing about social media and job hunting is that it helps you feel like you're not the only one out there, and you're not alone.

    ~ Larissa
    @LYF108

  • I'm in Salisbury – just over an hour away. Look forward to hearing what you're up to in London and checking it out.

  • I'm in Salisbury – just over an hour away. Look forward to hearing what you're up to in London and checking it out.

  • I'm in Salisbury – just over an hour away. Look forward to hearing what you're up to in London and checking it out.

  • I'm in Salisbury – just over an hour away. Look forward to hearing what you're up to in London and checking it out.

  • I'm in Salisbury – just over an hour away. Look forward to hearing what you're up to in London and checking it out.

  • Jason – Thanks for mentioning me in your post. The key point for me about all of this, is BALANCE. I don't think any one tactic is the answer… you need to use social media, online job boards, and in-person networking. The part that's most new to me, and a lot of other people, is social media, so I chose to focus on that area. My next blog post is actually going to be about in-person networking, following an interview I did with Diane Darling of Effective Networking. I think it's important for job-seekers (such as myself) to incorporate all methods. I'll send you a link when it's done. I'll be curious as to your thoughts.

    And, I do agree with the comments above that specifically, the online needs to move offline. I have found Twitter incredibly valuable for making connections, and then I take them offline. For example, I looked up specific social media companies in Boston, found people who worked there, and set up in-person meetings with each of them. I have found that to be an effective way to meet people away from the screen.

    I like your comment about “hand shake, a smile and a chat.” I couldn't agree more.

    So, overall, my message is BALANCE, especially in the current economic situation. You need to cover all your bases (which is why I'm still awake at 1:50am!).

    Thanks again for mentioning me!

    -Rachel- (@bostonmarketer)

  • Jason – Thanks for mentioning me in your post. The key point for me about all of this, is BALANCE. I don't think any one tactic is the answer… you need to use social media, online job boards, and in-person networking. The part that's most new to me, and a lot of other people, is social media, so I chose to focus on that area. My next blog post is actually going to be about in-person networking, following an interview I did with Diane Darling of Effective Networking. I think it's important for job-seekers (such as myself) to incorporate all methods. I'll send you a link when it's done. I'll be curious as to your thoughts.

    And, I do agree with the comments above that specifically, the online needs to move offline. I have found Twitter incredibly valuable for making connections, and then I take them offline. For example, I looked up specific social media companies in Boston, found people who worked there, and set up in-person meetings with each of them. I have found that to be an effective way to meet people away from the screen.

    I like your comment about “hand shake, a smile and a chat.” I couldn't agree more.

    So, overall, my message is BALANCE, especially in the current economic situation. You need to cover all your bases (which is why I'm still awake at 1:50am!).

    Thanks again for mentioning me!

    -Rachel- (@bostonmarketer)

  • Jason – Thanks for mentioning me in your post. The key point for me about all of this, is BALANCE. I don't think any one tactic is the answer… you need to use social media, online job boards, and in-person networking. The part that's most new to me, and a lot of other people, is social media, so I chose to focus on that area. My next blog post is actually going to be about in-person networking, following an interview I did with Diane Darling of Effective Networking. I think it's important for job-seekers (such as myself) to incorporate all methods. I'll send you a link when it's done. I'll be curious as to your thoughts.

    And, I do agree with the comments above that specifically, the online needs to move offline. I have found Twitter incredibly valuable for making connections, and then I take them offline. For example, I looked up specific social media companies in Boston, found people who worked there, and set up in-person meetings with each of them. I have found that to be an effective way to meet people away from the screen.

    I like your comment about “hand shake, a smile and a chat.” I couldn't agree more.

    So, overall, my message is BALANCE, especially in the current economic situation. You need to cover all your bases (which is why I'm still awake at 1:50am!).

    Thanks again for mentioning me!

    -Rachel- (@bostonmarketer)

  • Jason – Thanks for mentioning me in your post. The key point for me about all of this, is BALANCE. I don't think any one tactic is the answer… you need to use social media, online job boards, and in-person networking. The part that's most new to me, and a lot of other people, is social media, so I chose to focus on that area. My next blog post is actually going to be about in-person networking, following an interview I did with Diane Darling of Effective Networking. I think it's important for job-seekers (such as myself) to incorporate all methods. I'll send you a link when it's done. I'll be curious as to your thoughts.

    And, I do agree with the comments above that specifically, the online needs to move offline. I have found Twitter incredibly valuable for making connections, and then I take them offline. For example, I looked up specific social media companies in Boston, found people who worked there, and set up in-person meetings with each of them. I have found that to be an effective way to meet people away from the screen.

    I like your comment about “hand shake, a smile and a chat.” I couldn't agree more.

    So, overall, my message is BALANCE, especially in the current economic situation. You need to cover all your bases (which is why I'm still awake at 1:50am!).

    Thanks again for mentioning me!

    -Rachel- (@bostonmarketer)

  • Jason – Thanks for mentioning me in your post. The key point for me about all of this, is BALANCE. I don't think any one tactic is the answer… you need to use social media, online job boards, and in-person networking. The part that's most new to me, and a lot of other people, is social media, so I chose to focus on that area. My next blog post is actually going to be about in-person networking, following an interview I did with Diane Darling of Effective Networking. I think it's important for job-seekers (such as myself) to incorporate all methods. I'll send you a link when it's done. I'll be curious as to your thoughts.

    And, I do agree with the comments above that specifically, the online needs to move offline. I have found Twitter incredibly valuable for making connections, and then I take them offline. For example, I looked up specific social media companies in Boston, found people who worked there, and set up in-person meetings with each of them. I have found that to be an effective way to meet people away from the screen.

    I like your comment about “hand shake, a smile and a chat.” I couldn't agree more.

    So, overall, my message is BALANCE, especially in the current economic situation. You need to cover all your bases (which is why I'm still awake at 1:50am!).

    Thanks again for mentioning me!

    -Rachel- (@bostonmarketer)

  • Jason – Thanks for mentioning me in your post. The key point for me about all of this, is BALANCE. I don't think any one tactic is the answer… you need to use social media, online job boards, and in-person networking. The part that's most new to me, and a lot of other people, is social media, so I chose to focus on that area. My next blog post is actually going to be about in-person networking, following an interview I did with Diane Darling of Effective Networking. I think it's important for job-seekers (such as myself) to incorporate all methods. I'll send you a link when it's done. I'll be curious as to your thoughts.

    And, I do agree with the comments above that specifically, the online needs to move offline. I have found Twitter incredibly valuable for making connections, and then I take them offline. For example, I looked up specific social media companies in Boston, found people who worked there, and set up in-person meetings with each of them. I have found that to be an effective way to meet people away from the screen.

    I like your comment about “hand shake, a smile and a chat.” I couldn't agree more.

    So, overall, my message is BALANCE, especially in the current economic situation. You need to cover all your bases (which is why I'm still awake at 1:50am!).

    Thanks again for mentioning me!

    -Rachel- (@bostonmarketer)

    • Larissa

      Jason – great post and I totally agree. I have been actively job searching, but I use social media as a supplement to real, personal contact. Twitter and LinkedIn have been helpful for me in finding contacts to connect with who may be able to help me with an “in” at a particular job I've applied for. It's also great to have such a big network of PR/marketing folks who are always thinking of me for projects, potential jobs, etc. I've been lucky that social media experience HAS helped me secure some cool project work, which is keeping the bills paid. The nice thing about social media and job hunting is that it helps you feel like you're not the only one out there, and you're not alone.

      ~ Larissa
      @LYF108

      • My experience so far has been that the handshakes and the emails get me the job but understanding how to effectively use some of these online tools has made it possible to start to get my name out there as someone who understands it from a particular perspective

    • Thanks for pushing the topic out there, Rachel. I agree with you that Balance is the key. No one approach is going to always work, but a thorough one will.

      Thanks for stopping by and continuing the conversation.

  • Very true. Great points. We'll have the same conversation in 10 years and see how it's changed. (=

    Thanks for taking the time to reply. I love how you handle responding to your blog comments. I'll definitely be back.

    Dave

  • Very true. Great points. We'll have the same conversation in 10 years and see how it's changed. (=

    Thanks for taking the time to reply. I love how you handle responding to your blog comments. I'll definitely be back.

    Dave

  • Very true. Great points. We'll have the same conversation in 10 years and see how it's changed. (=

    Thanks for taking the time to reply. I love how you handle responding to your blog comments. I'll definitely be back.

    Dave

  • Spinko

    Very true. Great points. We'll have the same conversation in 10 years and see how it's changed. (=

    Thanks for taking the time to reply. I love how you handle responding to your blog comments. I'll definitely be back.

    Dave

  • Very true. Great points. We'll have the same conversation in 10 years and see how it's changed. (=

    Thanks for taking the time to reply. I love how you handle responding to your blog comments. I'll definitely be back.

    Dave

  • Jason you can always hire me as your favorite Troll, even though I am not a Troll. LOL

  • Jason you can always hire me as your favorite Troll, even though I am not a Troll. LOL

  • Jason you can always hire me as your favorite Troll, even though I am not a Troll. LOL

  • Jason you can always hire me as your favorite Troll, even though I am not a Troll. LOL

  • Jason you can always hire me as your favorite Troll, even though I am not a Troll. LOL

  • Thanks for the reassurance I'm not nuts, Carol. And good luck to your friends who are looking.

  • Thanks for the reassurance I'm not nuts, Carol. And good luck to your friends who are looking.

  • Thanks for the reassurance I'm not nuts, Carol. And good luck to your friends who are looking.

  • Thanks for the reassurance I'm not nuts, Carol. And good luck to your friends who are looking.

  • Thanks for the reassurance I'm not nuts, Carol. And good luck to your friends who are looking.

  • Don't disagree with your main point, Mack, but I don't think a sensational headline that gets people here to read the meat of the point is a disservice to my readers. Just the opposite. It's a service to remind them that social media alone isn't likely to get you a job. You've got to get off your ass and work the old fashion network (phone, in person, etc.). For all those putting too many eggs in the social media basket, I would argue that headline helped them wake up and smell the coffee a bit.

    Of course, I've been wrong before. Thanks for the push back.

  • Don't disagree with your main point, Mack, but I don't think a sensational headline that gets people here to read the meat of the point is a disservice to my readers. Just the opposite. It's a service to remind them that social media alone isn't likely to get you a job. You've got to get off your ass and work the old fashion network (phone, in person, etc.). For all those putting too many eggs in the social media basket, I would argue that headline helped them wake up and smell the coffee a bit.

    Of course, I've been wrong before. Thanks for the push back.

  • Don't disagree with your main point, Mack, but I don't think a sensational headline that gets people here to read the meat of the point is a disservice to my readers. Just the opposite. It's a service to remind them that social media alone isn't likely to get you a job. You've got to get off your ass and work the old fashion network (phone, in person, etc.). For all those putting too many eggs in the social media basket, I would argue that headline helped them wake up and smell the coffee a bit.

    Of course, I've been wrong before. Thanks for the push back.

  • Don't disagree with your main point, Mack, but I don't think a sensational headline that gets people here to read the meat of the point is a disservice to my readers. Just the opposite. It's a service to remind them that social media alone isn't likely to get you a job. You've got to get off your ass and work the old fashion network (phone, in person, etc.). For all those putting too many eggs in the social media basket, I would argue that headline helped them wake up and smell the coffee a bit.

    Of course, I've been wrong before. Thanks for the push back.

  • Don't disagree with your main point, Mack, but I don't think a sensational headline that gets people here to read the meat of the point is a disservice to my readers. Just the opposite. It's a service to remind them that social media alone isn't likely to get you a job. You've got to get off your ass and work the old fashion network (phone, in person, etc.). For all those putting too many eggs in the social media basket, I would argue that headline helped them wake up and smell the coffee a bit.

    Of course, I've been wrong before. Thanks for the push back.

  • Completely agree, David. And good point – If you aren't targeting a certain city or location, social media does help you cast a wide net. Obviously, I wouldn't walk away from social media when looking for a job, but still think the traditional methods are going to be the prevailing success mechanism until we in the digital age are the ultimate hiring managers. We're getting there, but the decision makers on jobs are still mostly older, traditional types. It's the off-line methods that will get you in front of them. Certainly doing that from a distance is more challenging, but a good, ole fashioned phone call often does wonders.

    Good luck to you, sir. I'm sure you'll land something soon. Thanks for stopping by.

  • Completely agree, David. And good point – If you aren't targeting a certain city or location, social media does help you cast a wide net. Obviously, I wouldn't walk away from social media when looking for a job, but still think the traditional methods are going to be the prevailing success mechanism until we in the digital age are the ultimate hiring managers. We're getting there, but the decision makers on jobs are still mostly older, traditional types. It's the off-line methods that will get you in front of them. Certainly doing that from a distance is more challenging, but a good, ole fashioned phone call often does wonders.

    Good luck to you, sir. I'm sure you'll land something soon. Thanks for stopping by.

  • Completely agree, David. And good point – If you aren't targeting a certain city or location, social media does help you cast a wide net. Obviously, I wouldn't walk away from social media when looking for a job, but still think the traditional methods are going to be the prevailing success mechanism until we in the digital age are the ultimate hiring managers. We're getting there, but the decision makers on jobs are still mostly older, traditional types. It's the off-line methods that will get you in front of them. Certainly doing that from a distance is more challenging, but a good, ole fashioned phone call often does wonders.

    Good luck to you, sir. I'm sure you'll land something soon. Thanks for stopping by.

  • Completely agree, David. And good point – If you aren't targeting a certain city or location, social media does help you cast a wide net. Obviously, I wouldn't walk away from social media when looking for a job, but still think the traditional methods are going to be the prevailing success mechanism until we in the digital age are the ultimate hiring managers. We're getting there, but the decision makers on jobs are still mostly older, traditional types. It's the off-line methods that will get you in front of them. Certainly doing that from a distance is more challenging, but a good, ole fashioned phone call often does wonders.

    Good luck to you, sir. I'm sure you'll land something soon. Thanks for stopping by.

  • Completely agree, David. And good point – If you aren't targeting a certain city or location, social media does help you cast a wide net. Obviously, I wouldn't walk away from social media when looking for a job, but still think the traditional methods are going to be the prevailing success mechanism until we in the digital age are the ultimate hiring managers. We're getting there, but the decision makers on jobs are still mostly older, traditional types. It's the off-line methods that will get you in front of them. Certainly doing that from a distance is more challenging, but a good, ole fashioned phone call often does wonders.

    Good luck to you, sir. I'm sure you'll land something soon. Thanks for stopping by.

  • You tell me what day you'll be here and we'll do it. I'm supposed to be recovering from surgery, but I'm sure I'll ignore doctor's orders. Heh.

    Thanks for the comment, too. You're right – the online can lead to the offline. But the real world is full of people who think online is checking email. Better to focus much of one's job searching in the real world as opposed to the social media space.

    Let me know when you're coming through.

  • You tell me what day you'll be here and we'll do it. I'm supposed to be recovering from surgery, but I'm sure I'll ignore doctor's orders. Heh.

    Thanks for the comment, too. You're right – the online can lead to the offline. But the real world is full of people who think online is checking email. Better to focus much of one's job searching in the real world as opposed to the social media space.

    Let me know when you're coming through.

  • You tell me what day you'll be here and we'll do it. I'm supposed to be recovering from surgery, but I'm sure I'll ignore doctor's orders. Heh.

    Thanks for the comment, too. You're right – the online can lead to the offline. But the real world is full of people who think online is checking email. Better to focus much of one's job searching in the real world as opposed to the social media space.

    Let me know when you're coming through.

  • You tell me what day you'll be here and we'll do it. I'm supposed to be recovering from surgery, but I'm sure I'll ignore doctor's orders. Heh.

    Thanks for the comment, too. You're right – the online can lead to the offline. But the real world is full of people who think online is checking email. Better to focus much of one's job searching in the real world as opposed to the social media space.

    Let me know when you're coming through.

  • You tell me what day you'll be here and we'll do it. I'm supposed to be recovering from surgery, but I'm sure I'll ignore doctor's orders. Heh.

    Thanks for the comment, too. You're right – the online can lead to the offline. But the real world is full of people who think online is checking email. Better to focus much of one's job searching in the real world as opposed to the social media space.

    Let me know when you're coming through.

  • Absolutely, Sonny. Social media is a nice foundation for the job search. But the walls and roof have to be built in the real world with the face-to-face. I'm sure your network is going to help you land the face-to-face opportunity you need to get out of the job market. Hang in there, man. You're smart as hell. Someone will gobble you up soon.

  • Absolutely, Sonny. Social media is a nice foundation for the job search. But the walls and roof have to be built in the real world with the face-to-face. I'm sure your network is going to help you land the face-to-face opportunity you need to get out of the job market. Hang in there, man. You're smart as hell. Someone will gobble you up soon.

  • Absolutely, Sonny. Social media is a nice foundation for the job search. But the walls and roof have to be built in the real world with the face-to-face. I'm sure your network is going to help you land the face-to-face opportunity you need to get out of the job market. Hang in there, man. You're smart as hell. Someone will gobble you up soon.

  • Absolutely, Sonny. Social media is a nice foundation for the job search. But the walls and roof have to be built in the real world with the face-to-face. I'm sure your network is going to help you land the face-to-face opportunity you need to get out of the job market. Hang in there, man. You're smart as hell. Someone will gobble you up soon.

  • Absolutely, Sonny. Social media is a nice foundation for the job search. But the walls and roof have to be built in the real world with the face-to-face. I'm sure your network is going to help you land the face-to-face opportunity you need to get out of the job market. Hang in there, man. You're smart as hell. Someone will gobble you up soon.

  • Completely agree and great points, Brian. One of the ways I got “networked” in the social media space was targeting influencers I wanted to meet and get to know before a conference, then arranging to have a drink, etc., at the conference. Smart way to do it. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Completely agree and great points, Brian. One of the ways I got “networked” in the social media space was targeting influencers I wanted to meet and get to know before a conference, then arranging to have a drink, etc., at the conference. Smart way to do it. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Completely agree and great points, Brian. One of the ways I got “networked” in the social media space was targeting influencers I wanted to meet and get to know before a conference, then arranging to have a drink, etc., at the conference. Smart way to do it. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Completely agree and great points, Brian. One of the ways I got “networked” in the social media space was targeting influencers I wanted to meet and get to know before a conference, then arranging to have a drink, etc., at the conference. Smart way to do it. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Completely agree and great points, Brian. One of the ways I got “networked” in the social media space was targeting influencers I wanted to meet and get to know before a conference, then arranging to have a drink, etc., at the conference. Smart way to do it. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • True dat. I'm the same way — couple of on-line only clients, but face-to-face is the predominant method. Thanks for stopping by.

  • True dat. I'm the same way — couple of on-line only clients, but face-to-face is the predominant method. Thanks for stopping by.

  • True dat. I'm the same way — couple of on-line only clients, but face-to-face is the predominant method. Thanks for stopping by.

  • True dat. I'm the same way — couple of on-line only clients, but face-to-face is the predominant method. Thanks for stopping by.

  • True dat. I'm the same way — couple of on-line only clients, but face-to-face is the predominant method. Thanks for stopping by.

  • CeCe – You can call me anytime. Thanks for the perspective and best of luck with the hunt.

  • CeCe – You can call me anytime. Thanks for the perspective and best of luck with the hunt.

  • CeCe – You can call me anytime. Thanks for the perspective and best of luck with the hunt.

  • CeCe – You can call me anytime. Thanks for the perspective and best of luck with the hunt.

  • CeCe – You can call me anytime. Thanks for the perspective and best of luck with the hunt.

  • Nice one, Cheap. And a good one, too. Thanks.

  • Nice one, Cheap. And a good one, too. Thanks.

  • Nice one, Cheap. And a good one, too. Thanks.

  • Nice one, Cheap. And a good one, too. Thanks.

  • Nice one, Cheap. And a good one, too. Thanks.

  • Agreed Dan, and certainly I would defer to someone of your expertise here. Speaking from my own experience in being hired and hiring, though, the off-line connection is much stronger than the on-line on both sides of the coin. My perspective. Thanks for commenting.

  • Agreed Dan, and certainly I would defer to someone of your expertise here. Speaking from my own experience in being hired and hiring, though, the off-line connection is much stronger than the on-line on both sides of the coin. My perspective. Thanks for commenting.

  • Agreed Dan, and certainly I would defer to someone of your expertise here. Speaking from my own experience in being hired and hiring, though, the off-line connection is much stronger than the on-line on both sides of the coin. My perspective. Thanks for commenting.

  • Agreed Dan, and certainly I would defer to someone of your expertise here. Speaking from my own experience in being hired and hiring, though, the off-line connection is much stronger than the on-line on both sides of the coin. My perspective. Thanks for commenting.

  • Agreed Dan, and certainly I would defer to someone of your expertise here. Speaking from my own experience in being hired and hiring, though, the off-line connection is much stronger than the on-line on both sides of the coin. My perspective. Thanks for commenting.

  • Totally agree, Ryan. Social media is helpful in establishing connections and credibility, but it's the off-line connection and in-person networking that wins the job. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Totally agree, Ryan. Social media is helpful in establishing connections and credibility, but it's the off-line connection and in-person networking that wins the job. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Totally agree, Ryan. Social media is helpful in establishing connections and credibility, but it's the off-line connection and in-person networking that wins the job. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Totally agree, Ryan. Social media is helpful in establishing connections and credibility, but it's the off-line connection and in-person networking that wins the job. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Totally agree, Ryan. Social media is helpful in establishing connections and credibility, but it's the off-line connection and in-person networking that wins the job. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Carol Baetzel

    Jason,

    Greetings from Phoenix. As a hospitality PR professional who's been in the industry for 25 years, I couldn't agree more. Thanks for a great article. I've passed it along to many of my co-horts in the tourism/hospitality industry who are currently unemployed and learning about this new wave of social media – when we were all raised in the era of “who you know” – reach out personally, write those thank you's, those intro letters or phone calls. Nice job. It's back to basics in more ways than one this year! Thanks for sharing.

    Carol in Phoenix

  • Carol Baetzel

    Jason,

    Greetings from Phoenix. As a hospitality PR professional who's been in the industry for 25 years, I couldn't agree more. Thanks for a great article. I've passed it along to many of my co-horts in the tourism/hospitality industry who are currently unemployed and learning about this new wave of social media – when we were all raised in the era of “who you know” – reach out personally, write those thank you's, those intro letters or phone calls. Nice job. It's back to basics in more ways than one this year! Thanks for sharing.

    Carol in Phoenix

  • Carol Baetzel

    Jason,

    Greetings from Phoenix. As a hospitality PR professional who's been in the industry for 25 years, I couldn't agree more. Thanks for a great article. I've passed it along to many of my co-horts in the tourism/hospitality industry who are currently unemployed and learning about this new wave of social media – when we were all raised in the era of “who you know” – reach out personally, write those thank you's, those intro letters or phone calls. Nice job. It's back to basics in more ways than one this year! Thanks for sharing.

    Carol in Phoenix

  • Carol Baetzel

    Jason,

    Greetings from Phoenix. As a hospitality PR professional who's been in the industry for 25 years, I couldn't agree more. Thanks for a great article. I've passed it along to many of my co-horts in the tourism/hospitality industry who are currently unemployed and learning about this new wave of social media – when we were all raised in the era of “who you know” – reach out personally, write those thank you's, those intro letters or phone calls. Nice job. It's back to basics in more ways than one this year! Thanks for sharing.

    Carol in Phoenix

  • Carol Baetzel

    Jason,

    Greetings from Phoenix. As a hospitality PR professional who's been in the industry for 25 years, I couldn't agree more. Thanks for a great article. I've passed it along to many of my co-horts in the tourism/hospitality industry who are currently unemployed and learning about this new wave of social media – when we were all raised in the era of “who you know” – reach out personally, write those thank you's, those intro letters or phone calls. Nice job. It's back to basics in more ways than one this year! Thanks for sharing.

    Carol in Phoenix

  • Carol Baetzel

    Jason,

    Greetings from Phoenix. As a hospitality PR professional who's been in the industry for 25 years, I couldn't agree more. Thanks for a great article. I've passed it along to many of my co-horts in the tourism/hospitality industry who are currently unemployed and learning about this new wave of social media – when we were all raised in the era of “who you know” – reach out personally, write those thank you's, those intro letters or phone calls. Nice job. It's back to basics in more ways than one this year! Thanks for sharing.

    Carol in Phoenix

    • Thanks for the reassurance I'm not nuts, Carol. And good luck to your friends who are looking.

  • Thank you Heather. I love it when folks talk dirty here. Heh.

    Are you in London, by chance? I'll be there May 14-16. Perhaps I'll see you.

  • Thank you Heather. I love it when folks talk dirty here. Heh.

    Are you in London, by chance? I'll be there May 14-16. Perhaps I'll see you.

  • Thank you Heather. I love it when folks talk dirty here. Heh.

    Are you in London, by chance? I'll be there May 14-16. Perhaps I'll see you.

  • Thank you Heather. I love it when folks talk dirty here. Heh.

    Are you in London, by chance? I'll be there May 14-16. Perhaps I'll see you.

  • Thank you Heather. I love it when folks talk dirty here. Heh.

    Are you in London, by chance? I'll be there May 14-16. Perhaps I'll see you.

  • A healthy dose of realism could do some social media evangelists good. Thanks, Professor.

  • A healthy dose of realism could do some social media evangelists good. Thanks, Professor.

  • A healthy dose of realism could do some social media evangelists good. Thanks, Professor.

  • A healthy dose of realism could do some social media evangelists good. Thanks, Professor.

  • A healthy dose of realism could do some social media evangelists good. Thanks, Professor.

  • Right, Ricky. Of course, social media can help put you in a position to network with folks off-line, increasing your chances of getting a job, but it's the off-line that counts for most folks still today.

  • Right, Ricky. Of course, social media can help put you in a position to network with folks off-line, increasing your chances of getting a job, but it's the off-line that counts for most folks still today.

  • Right, Ricky. Of course, social media can help put you in a position to network with folks off-line, increasing your chances of getting a job, but it's the off-line that counts for most folks still today.

  • Right, Ricky. Of course, social media can help put you in a position to network with folks off-line, increasing your chances of getting a job, but it's the off-line that counts for most folks still today.

  • Right, Ricky. Of course, social media can help put you in a position to network with folks off-line, increasing your chances of getting a job, but it's the off-line that counts for most folks still today.

  • Jason I get and agree with the point you are trying to make, that face-to-face networking is still enormously important. But at the same time, I think we do a bit of a disservice to our readers with 'sensational' titles/claims in a time like now, when so many people are looking for work. Social media can indeed help you get a job IF you leverage the tools properly. If you don't, then it can indeed hurt your changes. Same can be said for face-to-face networking.

  • Jason I get and agree with the point you are trying to make, that face-to-face networking is still enormously important. But at the same time, I think we do a bit of a disservice to our readers with 'sensational' titles/claims in a time like now, when so many people are looking for work. Social media can indeed help you get a job IF you leverage the tools properly. If you don't, then it can indeed hurt your changes. Same can be said for face-to-face networking.

  • Jason I get and agree with the point you are trying to make, that face-to-face networking is still enormously important. But at the same time, I think we do a bit of a disservice to our readers with 'sensational' titles/claims in a time like now, when so many people are looking for work. Social media can indeed help you get a job IF you leverage the tools properly. If you don't, then it can indeed hurt your changes. Same can be said for face-to-face networking.

  • Jason I get and agree with the point you are trying to make, that face-to-face networking is still enormously important. But at the same time, I think we do a bit of a disservice to our readers with 'sensational' titles/claims in a time like now, when so many people are looking for work. Social media can indeed help you get a job IF you leverage the tools properly. If you don't, then it can indeed hurt your changes. Same can be said for face-to-face networking.

  • Jason I get and agree with the point you are trying to make, that face-to-face networking is still enormously important. But at the same time, I think we do a bit of a disservice to our readers with 'sensational' titles/claims in a time like now, when so many people are looking for work. Social media can indeed help you get a job IF you leverage the tools properly. If you don't, then it can indeed hurt your changes. Same can be said for face-to-face networking.

  • Jason I get and agree with the point you are trying to make, that face-to-face networking is still enormously important. But at the same time, I think we do a bit of a disservice to our readers with 'sensational' titles/claims in a time like now, when so many people are looking for work. Social media can indeed help you get a job IF you leverage the tools properly. If you don't, then it can indeed hurt your changes. Same can be said for face-to-face networking.

    • Don't disagree with your main point, Mack, but I don't think a sensational headline that gets people here to read the meat of the point is a disservice to my readers. Just the opposite. It's a service to remind them that social media alone isn't likely to get you a job. You've got to get off your ass and work the old fashion network (phone, in person, etc.). For all those putting too many eggs in the social media basket, I would argue that headline helped them wake up and smell the coffee a bit.

      Of course, I've been wrong before. Thanks for the push back.

  • Great points, Ed. Thanks for chiming in. It certainly is nice to work in a field that does have some up-side potential in an economy where most everything is sliding downward.

  • Great points, Ed. Thanks for chiming in. It certainly is nice to work in a field that does have some up-side potential in an economy where most everything is sliding downward.

  • Great points, Ed. Thanks for chiming in. It certainly is nice to work in a field that does have some up-side potential in an economy where most everything is sliding downward.

  • Great points, Ed. Thanks for chiming in. It certainly is nice to work in a field that does have some up-side potential in an economy where most everything is sliding downward.

  • Great points, Ed. Thanks for chiming in. It certainly is nice to work in a field that does have some up-side potential in an economy where most everything is sliding downward.

  • Thanks Ed. Certainly the in-person approach works best for gaining clients, too. Though I will say I've had some luck working with folks online only as well.

    Thanks for the comment.

  • Thanks Ed. Certainly the in-person approach works best for gaining clients, too. Though I will say I've had some luck working with folks online only as well.

    Thanks for the comment.

  • Thanks Ed. Certainly the in-person approach works best for gaining clients, too. Though I will say I've had some luck working with folks online only as well.

    Thanks for the comment.

  • Thanks Ed. Certainly the in-person approach works best for gaining clients, too. Though I will say I've had some luck working with folks online only as well.

    Thanks for the comment.

  • Thanks Ed. Certainly the in-person approach works best for gaining clients, too. Though I will say I've had some luck working with folks online only as well.

    Thanks for the comment.

  • Thanks Igor. Nice having the Troll stop by from time to time. Not sure if I agree that knowing someone on Twitter may hinder you getting a job, but you certainly have to mind yourself on all social networks if you don't want things to come back and bite you.

    Thanks for stopping by.

  • Thanks Igor. Nice having the Troll stop by from time to time. Not sure if I agree that knowing someone on Twitter may hinder you getting a job, but you certainly have to mind yourself on all social networks if you don't want things to come back and bite you.

    Thanks for stopping by.

  • Thanks Igor. Nice having the Troll stop by from time to time. Not sure if I agree that knowing someone on Twitter may hinder you getting a job, but you certainly have to mind yourself on all social networks if you don't want things to come back and bite you.

    Thanks for stopping by.

  • Thanks Igor. Nice having the Troll stop by from time to time. Not sure if I agree that knowing someone on Twitter may hinder you getting a job, but you certainly have to mind yourself on all social networks if you don't want things to come back and bite you.

    Thanks for stopping by.

  • Thanks Igor. Nice having the Troll stop by from time to time. Not sure if I agree that knowing someone on Twitter may hinder you getting a job, but you certainly have to mind yourself on all social networks if you don't want things to come back and bite you.

    Thanks for stopping by.

  • Jason,

    I liked this post a lot and it definitely made me think a bit more about how I've been going about my job search. I will argue however that how much social media can help you, very much depends on the situation. As a college student in upstate NY (not where I plan on staying) it's hard for me to meet people face to face in NYC or somewhere else I may find a job. Social media has been an amazing tool for me to meet many professionals from all over the country. If you know exactly where you want to work, your method may work better. For someone like myself however, who is less concerned with where I work, I like to stay open to any opportunities, regardless of what city they come from. I'm not going to call every company in every city.

    I completely agree that nothing will ever replace face-to-face interaction. In most cases I wouldn't hire anyone that I haven't spoken to in person and wouldn't expect anyone else to. I believe however that social media can, and does provide an invaluable method of establishing connections which can be followed up with an interview or a meeting in person.

    Dave

  • Jason,

    I liked this post a lot and it definitely made me think a bit more about how I've been going about my job search. I will argue however that how much social media can help you, very much depends on the situation. As a college student in upstate NY (not where I plan on staying) it's hard for me to meet people face to face in NYC or somewhere else I may find a job. Social media has been an amazing tool for me to meet many professionals from all over the country. If you know exactly where you want to work, your method may work better. For someone like myself however, who is less concerned with where I work, I like to stay open to any opportunities, regardless of what city they come from. I'm not going to call every company in every city.

    I completely agree that nothing will ever replace face-to-face interaction. In most cases I wouldn't hire anyone that I haven't spoken to in person and wouldn't expect anyone else to. I believe however that social media can, and does provide an invaluable method of establishing connections which can be followed up with an interview or a meeting in person.

    Dave

  • Jason,

    I liked this post a lot and it definitely made me think a bit more about how I've been going about my job search. I will argue however that how much social media can help you, very much depends on the situation. As a college student in upstate NY (not where I plan on staying) it's hard for me to meet people face to face in NYC or somewhere else I may find a job. Social media has been an amazing tool for me to meet many professionals from all over the country. If you know exactly where you want to work, your method may work better. For someone like myself however, who is less concerned with where I work, I like to stay open to any opportunities, regardless of what city they come from. I'm not going to call every company in every city.

    I completely agree that nothing will ever replace face-to-face interaction. In most cases I wouldn't hire anyone that I haven't spoken to in person and wouldn't expect anyone else to. I believe however that social media can, and does provide an invaluable method of establishing connections which can be followed up with an interview or a meeting in person.

    Dave

  • Spinko

    Jason,

    I liked this post a lot and it definitely made me think a bit more about how I've been going about my job search. I will argue however that how much social media can help you, very much depends on the situation. As a college student in upstate NY (not where I plan on staying) it's hard for me to meet people face to face in NYC or somewhere else I may find a job. Social media has been an amazing tool for me to meet many professionals from all over the country. If you know exactly where you want to work, your method may work better. For someone like myself however, who is less concerned with where I work, I like to stay open to any opportunities, regardless of what city they come from. I'm not going to call every company in every city.

    I completely agree that nothing will ever replace face-to-face interaction. In most cases I wouldn't hire anyone that I haven't spoken to in person and wouldn't expect anyone else to. I believe however that social media can, and does provide an invaluable method of establishing connections which can be followed up with an interview or a meeting in person.

    Dave

  • Jason,

    I liked this post a lot and it definitely made me think a bit more about how I've been going about my job search. I will argue however that how much social media can help you, very much depends on the situation. As a college student in upstate NY (not where I plan on staying) it's hard for me to meet people face to face in NYC or somewhere else I may find a job. Social media has been an amazing tool for me to meet many professionals from all over the country. If you know exactly where you want to work, your method may work better. For someone like myself however, who is less concerned with where I work, I like to stay open to any opportunities, regardless of what city they come from. I'm not going to call every company in every city.

    I completely agree that nothing will ever replace face-to-face interaction. In most cases I wouldn't hire anyone that I haven't spoken to in person and wouldn't expect anyone else to. I believe however that social media can, and does provide an invaluable method of establishing connections which can be followed up with an interview or a meeting in person.

    Dave

  • Jason,

    I liked this post a lot and it definitely made me think a bit more about how I've been going about my job search. I will argue however that how much social media can help you, very much depends on the situation. As a college student in upstate NY (not where I plan on staying) it's hard for me to meet people face to face in NYC or somewhere else I may find a job. Social media has been an amazing tool for me to meet many professionals from all over the country. If you know exactly where you want to work, your method may work better. For someone like myself however, who is less concerned with where I work, I like to stay open to any opportunities, regardless of what city they come from. I'm not going to call every company in every city.

    I completely agree that nothing will ever replace face-to-face interaction. In most cases I wouldn't hire anyone that I haven't spoken to in person and wouldn't expect anyone else to. I believe however that social media can, and does provide an invaluable method of establishing connections which can be followed up with an interview or a meeting in person.

    Dave

    • Completely agree, David. And good point – If you aren't targeting a certain city or location, social media does help you cast a wide net. Obviously, I wouldn't walk away from social media when looking for a job, but still think the traditional methods are going to be the prevailing success mechanism until we in the digital age are the ultimate hiring managers. We're getting there, but the decision makers on jobs are still mostly older, traditional types. It's the off-line methods that will get you in front of them. Certainly doing that from a distance is more challenging, but a good, ole fashioned phone call often does wonders.

      Good luck to you, sir. I'm sure you'll land something soon. Thanks for stopping by.

      • Very true. Great points. We'll have the same conversation in 10 years and see how it's changed. (=

        Thanks for taking the time to reply. I love how you handle responding to your blog comments. I'll definitely be back.

        Dave

        • Thanks David. It's not about comments to me. It's about conversation. And me posting then never coming back to interact with the readers isn't a conversation. Plus it's arrogant. I love the back and forth. Thanks for being a part of it.

  • I'm thinking that based on the comments you've gotten on this one Jason that it's proof that one of the benefits of online social networks is the ability to leverage those connections off-line using traditional means. My experience so far has been that the handshakes and the emails get me the job but understanding how to effectively use some of these online tools has made it possible to start to get my name out there as someone who understands it from a particular perspective (offline community revitalization).

    The handshake may still mean more, but the networks allow folks to be much better “connected” as Mack's post eludes and as Ryan gets perfect in his comment.

    Oh yeah, I'm driving through on the way to Chicago at the end of the month; when are we doing lunch? :-)

  • I'm thinking that based on the comments you've gotten on this one Jason that it's proof that one of the benefits of online social networks is the ability to leverage those connections off-line using traditional means. My experience so far has been that the handshakes and the emails get me the job but understanding how to effectively use some of these online tools has made it possible to start to get my name out there as someone who understands it from a particular perspective (offline community revitalization).

    The handshake may still mean more, but the networks allow folks to be much better “connected” as Mack's post eludes and as Ryan gets perfect in his comment.

    Oh yeah, I'm driving through on the way to Chicago at the end of the month; when are we doing lunch? :-)

  • I'm thinking that based on the comments you've gotten on this one Jason that it's proof that one of the benefits of online social networks is the ability to leverage those connections off-line using traditional means. My experience so far has been that the handshakes and the emails get me the job but understanding how to effectively use some of these online tools has made it possible to start to get my name out there as someone who understands it from a particular perspective (offline community revitalization).

    The handshake may still mean more, but the networks allow folks to be much better “connected” as Mack's post eludes and as Ryan gets perfect in his comment.

    Oh yeah, I'm driving through on the way to Chicago at the end of the month; when are we doing lunch? :-)

  • I'm thinking that based on the comments you've gotten on this one Jason that it's proof that one of the benefits of online social networks is the ability to leverage those connections off-line using traditional means. My experience so far has been that the handshakes and the emails get me the job but understanding how to effectively use some of these online tools has made it possible to start to get my name out there as someone who understands it from a particular perspective (offline community revitalization).

    The handshake may still mean more, but the networks allow folks to be much better “connected” as Mack's post eludes and as Ryan gets perfect in his comment.

    Oh yeah, I'm driving through on the way to Chicago at the end of the month; when are we doing lunch? :-)

  • I'm thinking that based on the comments you've gotten on this one Jason that it's proof that one of the benefits of online social networks is the ability to leverage those connections off-line using traditional means. My experience so far has been that the handshakes and the emails get me the job but understanding how to effectively use some of these online tools has made it possible to start to get my name out there as someone who understands it from a particular perspective (offline community revitalization).

    The handshake may still mean more, but the networks allow folks to be much better “connected” as Mack's post eludes and as Ryan gets perfect in his comment.

    Oh yeah, I'm driving through on the way to Chicago at the end of the month; when are we doing lunch? :-)

  • I'm thinking that based on the comments you've gotten on this one Jason that it's proof that one of the benefits of online social networks is the ability to leverage those connections off-line using traditional means. My experience so far has been that the handshakes and the emails get me the job but understanding how to effectively use some of these online tools has made it possible to start to get my name out there as someone who understands it from a particular perspective (offline community revitalization).

    The handshake may still mean more, but the networks allow folks to be much better “connected” as Mack's post eludes and as Ryan gets perfect in his comment.

    Oh yeah, I'm driving through on the way to Chicago at the end of the month; when are we doing lunch? :-)

    • You tell me what day you'll be here and we'll do it. I'm supposed to be recovering from surgery, but I'm sure I'll ignore doctor's orders. Heh.

      Thanks for the comment, too. You're right – the online can lead to the offline. But the real world is full of people who think online is checking email. Better to focus much of one's job searching in the real world as opposed to the social media space.

      Let me know when you're coming through.

  • I've written on how the new social mediums expand our communications tool belt and the scope of who we reach but I agree with your sentiment on the personable interaction that creates the best relationships.

    Having been laid off for a couple months now, I have been able to go through several interviews (phone and in person) but more to the benefit of my network, a lot of whom I call friends and have met in person. The tools I use and the time it took to build my communities & the relationships within have no doubt benefited me through this and are a great extension to our current networking skills.

  • I've written on how the new social mediums expand our communications tool belt and the scope of who we reach but I agree with your sentiment on the personable interaction that creates the best relationships.

    Having been laid off for a couple months now, I have been able to go through several interviews (phone and in person) but more to the benefit of my network, a lot of whom I call friends and have met in person. The tools I use and the time it took to build my communities & the relationships within have no doubt benefited me through this and are a great extension to our current networking skills.

  • I've written on how the new social mediums expand our communications tool belt and the scope of who we reach but I agree with your sentiment on the personable interaction that creates the best relationships.

    Having been laid off for a couple months now, I have been able to go through several interviews (phone and in person) but more to the benefit of my network, a lot of whom I call friends and have met in person. The tools I use and the time it took to build my communities & the relationships within have no doubt benefited me through this and are a great extension to our current networking skills.

  • I've written on how the new social mediums expand our communications tool belt and the scope of who we reach but I agree with your sentiment on the personable interaction that creates the best relationships.

    Having been laid off for a couple months now, I have been able to go through several interviews (phone and in person) but more to the benefit of my network, a lot of whom I call friends and have met in person. The tools I use and the time it took to build my communities & the relationships within have no doubt benefited me through this and are a great extension to our current networking skills.

  • I've written on how the new social mediums expand our communications tool belt and the scope of who we reach but I agree with your sentiment on the personable interaction that creates the best relationships.

    Having been laid off for a couple months now, I have been able to go through several interviews (phone and in person) but more to the benefit of my network, a lot of whom I call friends and have met in person. The tools I use and the time it took to build my communities & the relationships within have no doubt benefited me through this and are a great extension to our current networking skills.

  • I've written on how the new social mediums expand our communications tool belt and the scope of who we reach but I agree with your sentiment on the personable interaction that creates the best relationships.

    Having been laid off for a couple months now, I have been able to go through several interviews (phone and in person) but more to the benefit of my network, a lot of whom I call friends and have met in person. The tools I use and the time it took to build my communities & the relationships within have no doubt benefited me through this and are a great extension to our current networking skills.

    • Absolutely, Sonny. Social media is a nice foundation for the job search. But the walls and roof have to be built in the real world with the face-to-face. I'm sure your network is going to help you land the face-to-face opportunity you need to get out of the job market. Hang in there, man. You're smart as hell. Someone will gobble you up soon.

  • Nice post Jason. I agree that there is no substitute for face-to-face.

    I've had some success with networking at industry events too. If possible, it's a good idea to check out who's going to be there ahead of time. Do a little research, and send a note to them beforehand.

  • Nice post Jason. I agree that there is no substitute for face-to-face.

    I've had some success with networking at industry events too. If possible, it's a good idea to check out who's going to be there ahead of time. Do a little research, and send a note to them beforehand.

  • Nice post Jason. I agree that there is no substitute for face-to-face.

    I've had some success with networking at industry events too. If possible, it's a good idea to check out who's going to be there ahead of time. Do a little research, and send a note to them beforehand.

  • Nice post Jason. I agree that there is no substitute for face-to-face.

    I've had some success with networking at industry events too. If possible, it's a good idea to check out who's going to be there ahead of time. Do a little research, and send a note to them beforehand.

  • Nice post Jason. I agree that there is no substitute for face-to-face.

    I've had some success with networking at industry events too. If possible, it's a good idea to check out who's going to be there ahead of time. Do a little research, and send a note to them beforehand.

  • Nice post Jason. I agree that there is no substitute for face-to-face.

    I've had some success with networking at industry events too. If possible, it's a good idea to check out who's going to be there ahead of time. Do a little research, and send a note to them beforehand.

    • Completely agree and great points, Brian. One of the ways I got “networked” in the social media space was targeting influencers I wanted to meet and get to know before a conference, then arranging to have a drink, etc., at the conference. Smart way to do it. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Thanks for injecting a bit of reason into the “social media can do everything” discussion. I would have to say that I have found several clients online, but then, I am an interactive marketing consultant. For the average person, old fashioned networking should continue to be a big part of the job search equation.

  • Thanks for injecting a bit of reason into the “social media can do everything” discussion. I would have to say that I have found several clients online, but then, I am an interactive marketing consultant. For the average person, old fashioned networking should continue to be a big part of the job search equation.

  • Thanks for injecting a bit of reason into the “social media can do everything” discussion. I would have to say that I have found several clients online, but then, I am an interactive marketing consultant. For the average person, old fashioned networking should continue to be a big part of the job search equation.

  • Thanks for injecting a bit of reason into the “social media can do everything” discussion. I would have to say that I have found several clients online, but then, I am an interactive marketing consultant. For the average person, old fashioned networking should continue to be a big part of the job search equation.

  • Thanks for injecting a bit of reason into the “social media can do everything” discussion. I would have to say that I have found several clients online, but then, I am an interactive marketing consultant. For the average person, old fashioned networking should continue to be a big part of the job search equation.

  • Thanks for injecting a bit of reason into the “social media can do everything” discussion. I would have to say that I have found several clients online, but then, I am an interactive marketing consultant. For the average person, old fashioned networking should continue to be a big part of the job search equation.

    • True dat. I'm the same way — couple of on-line only clients, but face-to-face is the predominant method. Thanks for stopping by.

  • Jason, I would have to agree with you to some degree. I would say that I've “met” lots of people via my blog, Twitter, and other social networks – some I've met in person, others I haven't had the opportunity to. Since being laid off, I've reached out to this community to get the word out about my availabilty for work.

    In about one week, I've had one in-person interview and discussed possible project work with another. The former was created by someone I never met but knew through my social networks. The latter opportunity was through a referral by someone I had worked with and met recently. IN some cases, I know others who are getting called for interviews because of their LinkedIn profiles.

    Like everything, I think some methods or combo of them will work for different people. So – are you free for a 10 minute conversation to discuss opportunities =)

  • Jason, I would have to agree with you to some degree. I would say that I've “met” lots of people via my blog, Twitter, and other social networks – some I've met in person, others I haven't had the opportunity to. Since being laid off, I've reached out to this community to get the word out about my availabilty for work.

    In about one week, I've had one in-person interview and discussed possible project work with another. The former was created by someone I never met but knew through my social networks. The latter opportunity was through a referral by someone I had worked with and met recently. IN some cases, I know others who are getting called for interviews because of their LinkedIn profiles.

    Like everything, I think some methods or combo of them will work for different people. So – are you free for a 10 minute conversation to discuss opportunities =)

  • Jason, I would have to agree with you to some degree. I would say that I've “met” lots of people via my blog, Twitter, and other social networks – some I've met in person, others I haven't had the opportunity to. Since being laid off, I've reached out to this community to get the word out about my availabilty for work.

    In about one week, I've had one in-person interview and discussed possible project work with another. The former was created by someone I never met but knew through my social networks. The latter opportunity was through a referral by someone I had worked with and met recently. IN some cases, I know others who are getting called for interviews because of their LinkedIn profiles.

    Like everything, I think some methods or combo of them will work for different people. So – are you free for a 10 minute conversation to discuss opportunities =)

  • Jason, I would have to agree with you to some degree. I would say that I've “met” lots of people via my blog, Twitter, and other social networks – some I've met in person, others I haven't had the opportunity to. Since being laid off, I've reached out to this community to get the word out about my availabilty for work.

    In about one week, I've had one in-person interview and discussed possible project work with another. The former was created by someone I never met but knew through my social networks. The latter opportunity was through a referral by someone I had worked with and met recently. IN some cases, I know others who are getting called for interviews because of their LinkedIn profiles.

    Like everything, I think some methods or combo of them will work for different people. So – are you free for a 10 minute conversation to discuss opportunities =)

  • Jason, I would have to agree with you to some degree. I would say that I've “met” lots of people via my blog, Twitter, and other social networks – some I've met in person, others I haven't had the opportunity to. Since being laid off, I've reached out to this community to get the word out about my availabilty for work.

    In about one week, I've had one in-person interview and discussed possible project work with another. The former was created by someone I never met but knew through my social networks. The latter opportunity was through a referral by someone I had worked with and met recently. IN some cases, I know others who are getting called for interviews because of their LinkedIn profiles.

    Like everything, I think some methods or combo of them will work for different people. So – are you free for a 10 minute conversation to discuss opportunities =)

  • Jason, I would have to agree with you to some degree. I would say that I've “met” lots of people via my blog, Twitter, and other social networks – some I've met in person, others I haven't had the opportunity to. Since being laid off, I've reached out to this community to get the word out about my availabilty for work.

    In about one week, I've had one in-person interview and discussed possible project work with another. The former was created by someone I never met but knew through my social networks. The latter opportunity was through a referral by someone I had worked with and met recently. IN some cases, I know others who are getting called for interviews because of their LinkedIn profiles.

    Like everything, I think some methods or combo of them will work for different people. So – are you free for a 10 minute conversation to discuss opportunities =)

    • CeCe – You can call me anytime. Thanks for the perspective and best of luck with the hunt.

  • cheapsuits

    SM doesn't hurt your job prospecting efforts either. Sounds like you need the two forked approach. Traditional and non traditional. Hmm where else have we heard that? PR, Advertising , marketing…

  • cheapsuits

    SM doesn't hurt your job prospecting efforts either. Sounds like you need the two forked approach. Traditional and non traditional. Hmm where else have we heard that? PR, Advertising , marketing…

  • cheapsuits

    SM doesn't hurt your job prospecting efforts either. Sounds like you need the two forked approach. Traditional and non traditional. Hmm where else have we heard that? PR, Advertising , marketing…

  • cheapsuits

    SM doesn't hurt your job prospecting efforts either. Sounds like you need the two forked approach. Traditional and non traditional. Hmm where else have we heard that? PR, Advertising , marketing…

  • cheapsuits

    SM doesn't hurt your job prospecting efforts either. Sounds like you need the two forked approach. Traditional and non traditional. Hmm where else have we heard that? PR, Advertising , marketing…

  • cheapsuits

    SM doesn't hurt your job prospecting efforts either. Sounds like you need the two forked approach. Traditional and non traditional. Hmm where else have we heard that? PR, Advertising , marketing…

    • Nice one, Cheap. And a good one, too. Thanks.

  • Jason, thanks for citing my name in this blog post. Your approach to getting a job is going to differ based on who you are as a person, as well as how many years of experience you have. For example, if you're highly connected online and then lose your job, it wont' be as hard to recover for the experienced professional. Recent college grades will use online means more than older generations, but older generations have cherished face-to-face networking more than younger generations. I would say face-to-face is stronger than online for sure, but the proper mix of both will set just about anyone up for success.

  • Jason, thanks for citing my name in this blog post. Your approach to getting a job is going to differ based on who you are as a person, as well as how many years of experience you have. For example, if you're highly connected online and then lose your job, it wont' be as hard to recover for the experienced professional. Recent college grades will use online means more than older generations, but older generations have cherished face-to-face networking more than younger generations. I would say face-to-face is stronger than online for sure, but the proper mix of both will set just about anyone up for success.

  • Jason, thanks for citing my name in this blog post. Your approach to getting a job is going to differ based on who you are as a person, as well as how many years of experience you have. For example, if you're highly connected online and then lose your job, it wont' be as hard to recover for the experienced professional. Recent college grades will use online means more than older generations, but older generations have cherished face-to-face networking more than younger generations. I would say face-to-face is stronger than online for sure, but the proper mix of both will set just about anyone up for success.

  • Jason, thanks for citing my name in this blog post. Your approach to getting a job is going to differ based on who you are as a person, as well as how many years of experience you have. For example, if you're highly connected online and then lose your job, it wont' be as hard to recover for the experienced professional. Recent college grades will use online means more than older generations, but older generations have cherished face-to-face networking more than younger generations. I would say face-to-face is stronger than online for sure, but the proper mix of both will set just about anyone up for success.

  • Jason, thanks for citing my name in this blog post. Your approach to getting a job is going to differ based on who you are as a person, as well as how many years of experience you have. For example, if you're highly connected online and then lose your job, it wont' be as hard to recover for the experienced professional. Recent college grades will use online means more than older generations, but older generations have cherished face-to-face networking more than younger generations. I would say face-to-face is stronger than online for sure, but the proper mix of both will set just about anyone up for success.

  • Jason, thanks for citing my name in this blog post. Your approach to getting a job is going to differ based on who you are as a person, as well as how many years of experience you have. For example, if you're highly connected online and then lose your job, it wont' be as hard to recover for the experienced professional. Recent college grades will use online means more than older generations, but older generations have cherished face-to-face networking more than younger generations. I would say face-to-face is stronger than online for sure, but the proper mix of both will set just about anyone up for success.

    • Agreed Dan, and certainly I would defer to someone of your expertise here. Speaking from my own experience in being hired and hiring, though, the off-line connection is much stronger than the on-line on both sides of the coin. My perspective. Thanks for commenting.

  • Agree and disagree, Jason. Social media won't get you a job in and of itself, but what it can do is grease the connections. For example, if I was coming to look for work in Louisville, I'd probably send you a note on Twitter. We've never met, but I know who you are, you may know who I am, and I've commented on your blog (as of today).

    Where I agree is that I'm not going to get the job unless I've got the right follow up and that's the emails and handshakes and phone calls. But social media, if done well can provide the introductions that you may never have otherwise had. I've had short “conversations” with people all over the world in all kinds of industries via social media who I otherwise wouldn't have had the opportunity to connect with.

    Not only that, but your participation online in any kind of discussions can help improve what people find when they search for you. If you're talking about the right topics with the right people, anyone doing a very cursory background check on you on Google will get an instant feel for who you are and what you're interested in.

    The biggest piece of advice I'd add is to build your network when you don't think you'd need it. You can do that pretty simply just by participating and engaging with people. You're going to still need to do the hard work when you're out looking for a job, but you should be building the connections along the way. Because who knows when I might need a contact in Louisville?

  • Agree and disagree, Jason. Social media won't get you a job in and of itself, but what it can do is grease the connections. For example, if I was coming to look for work in Louisville, I'd probably send you a note on Twitter. We've never met, but I know who you are, you may know who I am, and I've commented on your blog (as of today).

    Where I agree is that I'm not going to get the job unless I've got the right follow up and that's the emails and handshakes and phone calls. But social media, if done well can provide the introductions that you may never have otherwise had. I've had short “conversations” with people all over the world in all kinds of industries via social media who I otherwise wouldn't have had the opportunity to connect with.

    Not only that, but your participation online in any kind of discussions can help improve what people find when they search for you. If you're talking about the right topics with the right people, anyone doing a very cursory background check on you on Google will get an instant feel for who you are and what you're interested in.

    The biggest piece of advice I'd add is to build your network when you don't think you'd need it. You can do that pretty simply just by participating and engaging with people. You're going to still need to do the hard work when you're out looking for a job, but you should be building the connections along the way. Because who knows when I might need a contact in Louisville?

  • Agree and disagree, Jason. Social media won't get you a job in and of itself, but what it can do is grease the connections. For example, if I was coming to look for work in Louisville, I'd probably send you a note on Twitter. We've never met, but I know who you are, you may know who I am, and I've commented on your blog (as of today).

    Where I agree is that I'm not going to get the job unless I've got the right follow up and that's the emails and handshakes and phone calls. But social media, if done well can provide the introductions that you may never have otherwise had. I've had short “conversations” with people all over the world in all kinds of industries via social media who I otherwise wouldn't have had the opportunity to connect with.

    Not only that, but your participation online in any kind of discussions can help improve what people find when they search for you. If you're talking about the right topics with the right people, anyone doing a very cursory background check on you on Google will get an instant feel for who you are and what you're interested in.

    The biggest piece of advice I'd add is to build your network when you don't think you'd need it. You can do that pretty simply just by participating and engaging with people. You're going to still need to do the hard work when you're out looking for a job, but you should be building the connections along the way. Because who knows when I might need a contact in Louisville?

  • ryankuder

    Agree and disagree, Jason. Social media won't get you a job in and of itself, but what it can do is grease the connections. For example, if I was coming to look for work in Louisville, I'd probably send you a note on Twitter. We've never met, but I know who you are, you may know who I am, and I've commented on your blog (as of today).

    Where I agree is that I'm not going to get the job unless I've got the right follow up and that's the emails and handshakes and phone calls. But social media, if done well can provide the introductions that you may never have otherwise had. I've had short “conversations” with people all over the world in all kinds of industries via social media who I otherwise wouldn't have had the opportunity to connect with.

    Not only that, but your participation online in any kind of discussions can help improve what people find when they search for you. If you're talking about the right topics with the right people, anyone doing a very cursory background check on you on Google will get an instant feel for who you are and what you're interested in.

    The biggest piece of advice I'd add is to build your network when you don't think you'd need it. You can do that pretty simply just by participating and engaging with people. You're going to still need to do the hard work when you're out looking for a job, but you should be building the connections along the way. Because who knows when I might need a contact in Louisville?

  • ryankuder

    Agree and disagree, Jason. Social media won't get you a job in and of itself, but what it can do is grease the connections. For example, if I was coming to look for work in Louisville, I'd probably send you a note on Twitter. We've never met, but I know who you are, you may know who I am, and I've commented on your blog (as of today).

    Where I agree is that I'm not going to get the job unless I've got the right follow up and that's the emails and handshakes and phone calls. But social media, if done well can provide the introductions that you may never have otherwise had. I've had short “conversations” with people all over the world in all kinds of industries via social media who I otherwise wouldn't have had the opportunity to connect with.

    Not only that, but your participation online in any kind of discussions can help improve what people find when they search for you. If you're talking about the right topics with the right people, anyone doing a very cursory background check on you on Google will get an instant feel for who you are and what you're interested in.

    The biggest piece of advice I'd add is to build your network when you don't think you'd need it. You can do that pretty simply just by participating and engaging with people. You're going to still need to do the hard work when you're out looking for a job, but you should be building the connections along the way. Because who knows when I might need a contact in Louisville?

  • ryankuder

    Agree and disagree, Jason. Social media won't get you a job in and of itself, but what it can do is grease the connections. For example, if I was coming to look for work in Louisville, I'd probably send you a note on Twitter. We've never met, but I know who you are, you may know who I am, and I've commented on your blog (as of today).

    Where I agree is that I'm not going to get the job unless I've got the right follow up and that's the emails and handshakes and phone calls. But social media, if done well can provide the introductions that you may never have otherwise had. I've had short “conversations” with people all over the world in all kinds of industries via social media who I otherwise wouldn't have had the opportunity to connect with.

    Not only that, but your participation online in any kind of discussions can help improve what people find when they search for you. If you're talking about the right topics with the right people, anyone doing a very cursory background check on you on Google will get an instant feel for who you are and what you're interested in.

    The biggest piece of advice I'd add is to build your network when you don't think you'd need it. You can do that pretty simply just by participating and engaging with people. You're going to still need to do the hard work when you're out looking for a job, but you should be building the connections along the way. Because who knows when I might need a contact in Louisville?

    • Totally agree, Ryan. Social media is helpful in establishing connections and credibility, but it's the off-line connection and in-person networking that wins the job. Thanks for the thoughts.

  • Good advice – what people want to see are the skills and capabilities that you'll bring to the workplace. By being pro-active and resourceful, you demonstrated that brilliantly. Like most things in life, you need to get off your bum (I'm English too) rather than hiding behind a computer screen.

  • Good advice – what people want to see are the skills and capabilities that you'll bring to the workplace. By being pro-active and resourceful, you demonstrated that brilliantly. Like most things in life, you need to get off your bum (I'm English too) rather than hiding behind a computer screen.

  • Good advice – what people want to see are the skills and capabilities that you'll bring to the workplace. By being pro-active and resourceful, you demonstrated that brilliantly. Like most things in life, you need to get off your bum (I'm English too) rather than hiding behind a computer screen.

  • Good advice – what people want to see are the skills and capabilities that you'll bring to the workplace. By being pro-active and resourceful, you demonstrated that brilliantly. Like most things in life, you need to get off your bum (I'm English too) rather than hiding behind a computer screen.

  • Good advice – what people want to see are the skills and capabilities that you'll bring to the workplace. By being pro-active and resourceful, you demonstrated that brilliantly. Like most things in life, you need to get off your bum (I'm English too) rather than hiding behind a computer screen.

  • Good advice – what people want to see are the skills and capabilities that you'll bring to the workplace. By being pro-active and resourceful, you demonstrated that brilliantly. Like most things in life, you need to get off your bum (I'm English too) rather than hiding behind a computer screen.

    • Thank you Heather. I love it when folks talk dirty here. Heh.

      Are you in London, by chance? I'll be there May 14-16. Perhaps I'll see you.

      • I'm in Salisbury – just over an hour away. Look forward to hearing what you're up to in London and checking it out.

  • BillSledzik

    Thanks, Jason. It's important that our thought leaders in social media be willing to address its limitations. This post doesn't diminish the value of SM, but it certainly helps put things in perspective for those who've come to see social media as a magic potion.

  • BillSledzik

    Thanks, Jason. It's important that our thought leaders in social media be willing to address its limitations. This post doesn't diminish the value of SM, but it certainly helps put things in perspective for those who've come to see social media as a magic potion.

  • BillSledzik

    Thanks, Jason. It's important that our thought leaders in social media be willing to address its limitations. This post doesn't diminish the value of SM, but it certainly helps put things in perspective for those who've come to see social media as a magic potion.

  • BillSledzik

    Thanks, Jason. It's important that our thought leaders in social media be willing to address its limitations. This post doesn't diminish the value of SM, but it certainly helps put things in perspective for those who've come to see social media as a magic potion.

  • BillSledzik

    Thanks, Jason. It's important that our thought leaders in social media be willing to address its limitations. This post doesn't diminish the value of SM, but it certainly helps put things in perspective for those who've come to see social media as a magic potion.

  • BillSledzik

    Thanks, Jason. It's important that our thought leaders in social media be willing to address its limitations. This post doesn't diminish the value of SM, but it certainly helps put things in perspective for those who've come to see social media as a magic potion.

    • A healthy dose of realism could do some social media evangelists good. Thanks, Professor.

  • Well said Jason. Its pretty obvious that social media wont get you a job, if you want to get a job, you go get them else you'll ended up waiting and wasting your valuable time.

  • Well said Jason. Its pretty obvious that social media wont get you a job, if you want to get a job, you go get them else you'll ended up waiting and wasting your valuable time.

  • Well said Jason. Its pretty obvious that social media wont get you a job, if you want to get a job, you go get them else you'll ended up waiting and wasting your valuable time.

  • Well said Jason. Its pretty obvious that social media wont get you a job, if you want to get a job, you go get them else you'll ended up waiting and wasting your valuable time.

  • Well said Jason. Its pretty obvious that social media wont get you a job, if you want to get a job, you go get them else you'll ended up waiting and wasting your valuable time.

  • Well said Jason. Its pretty obvious that social media wont get you a job, if you want to get a job, you go get them else you'll ended up waiting and wasting your valuable time.

    • Right, Ricky. Of course, social media can help put you in a position to network with folks off-line, increasing your chances of getting a job, but it's the off-line that counts for most folks still today.

  • As with all work/life, there's talking the talk and walking the walk.

    As you say, social media networking alone, should never get you a job or ensure you stay in your job.

    I would say digital media as whole area rather than social media, is a good industry to be in at the moment and even during a recession it seems to be seeing growth where others are shrinking.

    Social media still hasn't reassured many in main stream media agencies and client side marketing teams that it can be successful yet. Digital media however is a tried, tested and quantified market.

    During my time as a network manager, I'd meet folk who clearly didn't know what they were doing. The only way they were going to convince me otherwise was by their actions when they were involved in projects I was part of.

    Organic growth of business through word of mouth from previously satisfied clients is invaluable when times are tight though, and social media can help with this. However Twittering without value add, serves no purpose, particularly in the hunt for job.

  • As with all work/life, there's talking the talk and walking the walk.

    As you say, social media networking alone, should never get you a job or ensure you stay in your job.

    I would say digital media as whole area rather than social media, is a good industry to be in at the moment and even during a recession it seems to be seeing growth where others are shrinking.

    Social media still hasn't reassured many in main stream media agencies and client side marketing teams that it can be successful yet. Digital media however is a tried, tested and quantified market.

    During my time as a network manager, I'd meet folk who clearly didn't know what they were doing. The only way they were going to convince me otherwise was by their actions when they were involved in projects I was part of.

    Organic growth of business through word of mouth from previously satisfied clients is invaluable when times are tight though, and social media can help with this. However Twittering without value add, serves no purpose, particularly in the hunt for job.

  • As with all work/life, there's talking the talk and walking the walk.

    As you say, social media networking alone, should never get you a job or ensure you stay in your job.

    I would say digital media as whole area rather than social media, is a good industry to be in at the moment and even during a recession it seems to be seeing growth where others are shrinking.

    Social media still hasn't reassured many in main stream media agencies and client side marketing teams that it can be successful yet. Digital media however is a tried, tested and quantified market.

    During my time as a network manager, I'd meet folk who clearly didn't know what they were doing. The only way they were going to convince me otherwise was by their actions when they were involved in projects I was part of.

    Organic growth of business through word of mouth from previously satisfied clients is invaluable when times are tight though, and social media can help with this. However Twittering without value add, serves no purpose, particularly in the hunt for job.

  • As with all work/life, there's talking the talk and walking the walk.

    As you say, social media networking alone, should never get you a job or ensure you stay in your job.

    I would say digital media as whole area rather than social media, is a good industry to be in at the moment and even during a recession it seems to be seeing growth where others are shrinking.

    Social media still hasn't reassured many in main stream media agencies and client side marketing teams that it can be successful yet. Digital media however is a tried, tested and quantified market.

    During my time as a network manager, I'd meet folk who clearly didn't know what they were doing. The only way they were going to convince me otherwise was by their actions when they were involved in projects I was part of.

    Organic growth of business through word of mouth from previously satisfied clients is invaluable when times are tight though, and social media can help with this. However Twittering without value add, serves no purpose, particularly in the hunt for job.

  • As with all work/life, there's talking the talk and walking the walk.

    As you say, social media networking alone, should never get you a job or ensure you stay in your job.

    I would say digital media as whole area rather than social media, is a good industry to be in at the moment and even during a recession it seems to be seeing growth where others are shrinking.

    Social media still hasn't reassured many in main stream media agencies and client side marketing teams that it can be successful yet. Digital media however is a tried, tested and quantified market.

    During my time as a network manager, I'd meet folk who clearly didn't know what they were doing. The only way they were going to convince me otherwise was by their actions when they were involved in projects I was part of.

    Organic growth of business through word of mouth from previously satisfied clients is invaluable when times are tight though, and social media can help with this. However Twittering without value add, serves no purpose, particularly in the hunt for job.

  • As with all work/life, there's talking the talk and walking the walk.

    As you say, social media networking alone, should never get you a job or ensure you stay in your job.

    I would say digital media as whole area rather than social media, is a good industry to be in at the moment and even during a recession it seems to be seeing growth where others are shrinking.

    Social media still hasn't reassured many in main stream media agencies and client side marketing teams that it can be successful yet. Digital media however is a tried, tested and quantified market.

    During my time as a network manager, I'd meet folk who clearly didn't know what they were doing. The only way they were going to convince me otherwise was by their actions when they were involved in projects I was part of.

    Organic growth of business through word of mouth from previously satisfied clients is invaluable when times are tight though, and social media can help with this. However Twittering without value add, serves no purpose, particularly in the hunt for job.

    • Great points, Ed. Thanks for chiming in. It certainly is nice to work in a field that does have some up-side potential in an economy where most everything is sliding downward.

  • Ed

    It's heartening to read your perspective and I am dead sure this applies to seeking out clients as well. Being well connected and popular are advantages that one can leverage upon, but they are not everything. I didn't get a new project because I am using all these tools certainly. It was several calls/trips to the client's office, breaking down social media in layman's terms.

    And I don't even have a LinkedIn account yet. Hahaha…!

  • Ed

    It's heartening to read your perspective and I am dead sure this applies to seeking out clients as well. Being well connected and popular are advantages that one can leverage upon, but they are not everything. I didn't get a new project because I am using all these tools certainly. It was several calls/trips to the client's office, breaking down social media in layman's terms.

    And I don't even have a LinkedIn account yet. Hahaha…!

  • Ed

    It's heartening to read your perspective and I am dead sure this applies to seeking out clients as well. Being well connected and popular are advantages that one can leverage upon, but they are not everything. I didn't get a new project because I am using all these tools certainly. It was several calls/trips to the client's office, breaking down social media in layman's terms.

    And I don't even have a LinkedIn account yet. Hahaha…!

  • Ed

    It's heartening to read your perspective and I am dead sure this applies to seeking out clients as well. Being well connected and popular are advantages that one can leverage upon, but they are not everything. I didn't get a new project because I am using all these tools certainly. It was several calls/trips to the client's office, breaking down social media in layman's terms.

    And I don't even have a LinkedIn account yet. Hahaha…!

  • Ed

    It's heartening to read your perspective and I am dead sure this applies to seeking out clients as well. Being well connected and popular are advantages that one can leverage upon, but they are not everything. I didn't get a new project because I am using all these tools certainly. It was several calls/trips to the client's office, breaking down social media in layman's terms.

    And I don't even have a LinkedIn account yet. Hahaha…!

  • Ed

    It's heartening to read your perspective and I am dead sure this applies to seeking out clients as well. Being well connected and popular are advantages that one can leverage upon, but they are not everything. I didn't get a new project because I am using all these tools certainly. It was several calls/trips to the client's office, breaking down social media in layman's terms.

    And I don't even have a LinkedIn account yet. Hahaha…!

    • Thanks Ed. Certainly the in-person approach works best for gaining clients, too. Though I will say I've had some luck working with folks online only as well.

      Thanks for the comment.

  • Actually knowing someone on Twitter may hinder you getting a job. They may not like what you saying or think of you as a Spammer. Good post. There is nothing like contacting Human Resources or the department manager if you want a job with the company.

  • Actually knowing someone on Twitter may hinder you getting a job. They may not like what you saying or think of you as a Spammer. Good post. There is nothing like contacting Human Resources or the department manager if you want a job with the company.

  • Actually knowing someone on Twitter may hinder you getting a job. They may not like what you saying or think of you as a Spammer. Good post. There is nothing like contacting Human Resources or the department manager if you want a job with the company.

  • Actually knowing someone on Twitter may hinder you getting a job. They may not like what you saying or think of you as a Spammer. Good post. There is nothing like contacting Human Resources or the department manager if you want a job with the company.

  • Actually knowing someone on Twitter may hinder you getting a job. They may not like what you saying or think of you as a Spammer. Good post. There is nothing like contacting Human Resources or the department manager if you want a job with the company.

  • Actually knowing someone on Twitter may hinder you getting a job. They may not like what you saying or think of you as a Spammer. Good post. There is nothing like contacting Human Resources or the department manager if you want a job with the company.

    • Thanks Igor. Nice having the Troll stop by from time to time. Not sure if I agree that knowing someone on Twitter may hinder you getting a job, but you certainly have to mind yourself on all social networks if you don't want things to come back and bite you.

      Thanks for stopping by.

      • Jason you can always hire me as your favorite Troll, even though I am not a Troll. LOL