What You Need To Know About Privacy, Security and Safety On The Social Web
What You Need To Know About Privacy, Security and Safety On The Social Web
by

We live in the era of OpenID and Mark Zuckerberg’s statement that, “the age of privacy is over.” But your financial information, social security numbers and even social networking logins and passwords are important bits of data to protect. As we move toward a one-login-fits-all system and open more of our lives on the social web, we still need to be aware of privacy, security and safety concerns for ourselves, our computers and our information.

IdentityTheft911.com is a leading resolutions service for identity theft and management services. I caught up with its Information Security Officer Ondrej Krehel recently for a video chat about identity theft, online security, phishing scams and cyber threats.

Online Privacy, Security and Safety Tips From Ondrej Krehel from Jason Falls on Vimeo.

Some of the finer points of Krehel’s points include:

  • Separate your social networking logins, passwords and perhaps even emails from your financial information credentials.
  • U.S. courts have found a person guilty of computer fraud for posing as someone else on a social networking site. If you fake and identity and your activity leads to a crime, you are liable for that activity.
  • Ensure your computer is updated with security patches, anti-virus software, spyware detection updates and more.
  • Be aware of what you’re doing online. Don’t click on links or images from people you don’t know, not just in your email, but also in messages on your social networks like Facebook and Twitter.
  • It’s not just about infecting your accounts and computers, but if you are infected, you also potentially infect your friends and social network connections as well.
  • Apple users are not immune to vulnerabilities related to online scams, malware and identity theft scams.
  • Companies need to strongly review and consider policies for allowing open social networking because of fraud and piracy issues. Make your users aware of malware and privacy issues if you are going to allow employee use.
  • If an offer appears to good to be true, it might be. Any advertising or promotional offer that asks you for email addresses, credit card information and the like should be considered very carefully.

Identity Theft 911 can be found online at both their corporate webste (http://identitytheft911.com) and their educational portal (http://identitytheft911.org).

For more details on the case of Lori Drew, who was convicted of computer fraud for posing as a teenage boy online to trick a teenage girl, see the New York Times coverage of the verdict.

And no, I’m not necessarily much taller than Krehel. The side-by-side camera thingy with our differing camera angles just makes it look that way. Heh.

About the Author

Jason Falls
Jason Falls is the founder of Social Media Explorer and one of the most notable and outspoken voices in the social media marketing industry. He is a noted marketing keynote speaker, author of two books and unapologetic bourbon aficionado. He can also be found at JasonFalls.com.
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  • This was less spammy than your other comments, so I'll let it slide. You're
    getting better.

  • kellybriefworld

    Using social media sites puts a company's network security and privacy at risk, and causes problems for its IT department. Some of the threats include Malware, brand hijacking, lack of control over content and a number of other things. It is important to practice common sense, and more importantly, have a social media policy in place. For businesses: make informed decisions about blocking social media sites, and create a sound social media policy for your company by checking out: http://bit.ly/d2NZRp

  • kellybriefworld

    Using social media sites puts a company's network security and privacy at risk, and causes problems for its IT department. Some of the threats include Malware, brand hijacking, lack of control over content and a number of other things. It is important to practice common sense, and more importantly, have a social media policy in place. For businesses: make informed decisions about blocking social media sites, and create a sound social media policy for your company by checking out: http://bit.ly/d2NZRp

    • This was less spammy than your other comments, so I'll let it slide. You're
      getting better.

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  • Truly informative. The points you've mentioned above regarding the security issues are going to be really helpful for everyone.

    I agree Allen, use different passwords for each ID and try to add some special characters in your passwords as well!

    Thanks.

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  • I think the article is great and the content is of high quality as usual. Nowadays it is important to have the necessary information and advices when it comes to using social media sites in the right way. This means that it is a must to know about the different policies of the different social media sites.

  • Oh yeah! Passwords are easily hacked when they are Week! I would suggest specially to business people not to have same password for lots of stuff. Also recreate your passwords with all possible characters like – uppercase, lowercase, and special characters – like @#$%^&*”

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  • When I was younger I didn't really care about how public my social profiles were online. Now I have totally changed, as I have learned overtime the importance of online security. I now have an idea of what information is displayed on each website. Always good to be extra safe

  • I think privacy must have been in the water this week in Kentucky… I posted a lot on it.

  • ew4387

    I agree with Scott…despite the younger generation's vaunted techno skills, it seems to me that they are the least concerned with online security and I think we have not seen anything yet in terms of privacy related security breaches.

  • I'm pretty cautious about what I click on when receiving emails (from networking accounts, etc.). Unless it's something that I've received directly from someone I know, I don't click on it. Even then, if it's via Direct Message (Twitter for example), I'll go ahead and ask the person to confirm they've sent me something and ask what it is. Paranoid? Maybe. But certainly cautious.

    Now, I don't know if the following is entirely relevant here Jason so excuse me if it's not… Here's a post that I wrote a while back on creating unique passwords for multiple accounts:
    http://www.ribeeziemedia.com/how-to-create-a-un

    (Feel free to delete if it's not particularly fitting to the topic.)

    Catch ya later and tell your Mom some dude named Ribeezie said Happy Mother's day! :-P

  • I think the concept of Open ID and Facebook connect is great – but the reality is scary. Just last week my Gmail account was hacked by those folks who managed to hack google's password database. If I was able (and willing) to use my Google account to login to all my other accounts – I would have had a horrible situation on my hands. I think we all need a does of skepticism when it comes to ANY information on the internet – no matter how secure the claims the may be.

  • The scary thing about Facebook's privacy updates is that more then half of the users have no idea these privacy updates are actually happening. When users are aware of the settings they have a hard time figuring out how to use them. I know I already have had to adjust some of my family's profiles because they had no idea how to hide information. They are just coming on Facebook, without realization of the changes, and not implementing the new setting. This is leading to information leaking out unknowingly. Facebook should stop messing with the settings or they are going to end up losing a lot of fans.

  • scottfm54

    Education is the key here… older, wiser and more paranoid folks like me tend to be a bit more concerned about privacy issues but I see younger users, especially middle school and high school kids (my own [at times] and their friends) as being blissfully unaware of the consequences of lax security and accessibility.

  • Hey Jason, funny that this post is about privacy and security and the video is set to private :-)